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As a long term reader of MacInTouch, I don't know why I never asked here about this problem before... this is the second MacBook Pro I have had the problem with. Both are about 8-10 year old machines, with original everything.

Frequently, as in once or more times a day, when I close the lid, the machine will not wake up and must be rebooted. Occasionally, it reboots while the lid is closed.

Is thie an old and failing hard drive? A power supply issue? Something to do with the lid closure mechanism?

I don't want to randomly spend money on an old machine, but if the simple addition of a new drive would cure this, it would be worthwhile.

Ideas?
 


Is this an old and failing hard drive? A power supply issue? Something to do with the lid closure mechanism?... Ideas?
What have you done to check or test it so far? My top suggestions would be repair the drive (fsck / repair in Disk Utility); check the drive SMART status or other signs disk is failing; and reinstall/restore the system.

Do this with a good Carbon Copy Cloner backup and another copy of data.

Actually my top priority for this computer would just be to replace the hard drive with an SSD - you'll be amazed at the bang for your buck - but probably only after confirming nothing else wrong with it.

My own personal guess from some similar issues in the past is that a file system problem or a failing drive are most likely underlying issues. But it could be something else.
 


Have you looked through the log files to see what is happening when the machine has these issues? There may be a clue there to what is going on.
 



I had similar symptoms on a mid-2010 MacBook Pro, which eventually died. The cause was a failed power supply transistor on the logic board, which a friend managed to unsolder and replace, albeit with the loss of the lower RAM slot (perhaps an unrelated issue). The machine is running today, and with its i7 processor, repairability and non-glare screen, is difficult to justify replacing with a new machine at today's unreasonable Apple pricing and poor repairability.
 


Apple's design team, run by Jony Ive (who is personally responsible for Apple's current user interface designs...) is going through some changes...
I have been curious, the last couple years, as to the lack of function-flex in the Touch tool bar. For instance,

• When iTunes is the prominent app, I want easy access to volume controls, instead of the intuitive-not process of tapping then (locating) and swiping for volume attenuation. For me, nothing beats the 3-button Volume control, bing-bang-boom​
• While optical discs are rather marginalized on Mac these days, Apple still does make an external drive. And to the best of my recollection, the Touch Bar does not flex-up to a set of appropriate function-pads... like Eject...​
 


Frequently, as in once or more times a day, when I close the lid, the machine will not wake up and must be rebooted. Occasionally, it reboots while the lid is closed.
This situation could result from quite a few causes. As others have suggested, it could be a faulty lid sensor, a problem with the power supply, or a more subtle problem with other circuitry. It also could be a problem with the battery. While I can't rule out a drive problem, I'd actually put that toward the bottom of the list.

On the list of "easy" things to try, I definitely would include a System Management Controller (SMC) reset.

Take a look at the battery health with a utility like coconutBattery. It's also worth doing a visual inspection of the battery to see if there is any physical battery expansion. When aging or defective batteries expand, they can interfere with the operation of components like the trackpad and lid sensor (among other things), leading to unexpected or erratic behaviors. You may need to open the case to examine the battery, but significant battery expansion often can be detected by observing curved or open seams along the case bottom.
 


I have been curious, the last couple years, as to the lack of function-flex in the Touch tool bar. For instance,

• When iTunes is the prominent app, I want easy access to volume controls, instead of the intuitive-not process of tapping then (locating) and swiping for volume attenuation. For me, nothing beats the 3-button Volume control, bing-bang-boom​
If you abandon function flex, you will find the volume controls you want in the default expanded control strip. Via the Keyboard System Preference, you can, of course, customize the controls there more to your liking. Personally, I very much like the standard default method of varying brightness and volume by calling up sliders so that more functions are available, but, obviously, tastes differ.

Note that if you prefer keeping function-flex, tapping the caret at the left end of the system portion of the control strip will show the expanded system strip with the key-based volume control set.
 


Have you looked through the log files to see what is happening when the machine has these issues? There may be a clue there to what is going on.
Brian, I hate to sound ignorant but even as a 35 year user of Mac, I don't know what log files you mean!
It could be a malfunctioning magnetic switch that senses lid closure. Have you attempted mild percussive maintenance?
James, I suspect you are saying something similiar to the old adage, hit the TV on the side.
On the list of "easy" things to try, I definitely would include a System Management Controller (SMC) reset.
James, I will try this.

To all who answered, thank you, I have stuff to try now. But, as I suspected, it wasn't something obvious, that everyone else knows and I missed.
 


I have been curious, the last couple years, as to the lack of function-flex in the Touch tool bar. For instance,
• When iTunes is the prominent app, I want easy access to volume controls, instead of the intuitive-not process of tapping then (locating) and swiping for volume attenuation. For me, nothing beats the 3-button Volume control, bing-bang-boom​
If you leave your finger on the volume button, then slide the finger left or right, it will control the slider to the left of your finger. The same thing works for the brightness button. No need to lift the finger from the button and move it over the slider that appears to the left of the button.

I do agree, I miss the quick ability of muting sound or changing volume by feel without looking down and trying to place your finger in the right spot.
 


If you leave your finger on the volume button, then slide the finger left or right, it will control the slider to the left of your finger. The same thing works for the brightness button. No need to lift the finger from the button and move it over the slider that appears to the left of the button.
Great! Thanks for those hints.
 


MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Early 2013):

When I try to load Apple Hardware Test from the Internet (startup with D key), it doesn't start, but shows a message:
Error: 8000000000000003, Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi'
Status: 0x00000003
which sits there for about five minutes, then it restarts into macOS.

Same result when I try to run Apple Hardware Test from a USB stick, except this time it shows the above message twice – flashing by so quickly I had to get a video of it to see what it said – then immediately restarts into macOS.

The OS version of Apple Service Diagnostic works okay (it has an OS on it, and shows in the Startup Disk preference pane), but the EFI version gives the same result as above.

I've reset the SMC and NVRAM and reinstalled the OS (Sierra) numerous times to no avail.

I ran both Apple Hardware Test (Internet and USB) and Apple Service Diagnostic/EFI successfully a couple times only a few months ago — something's changed, but I can't figure out what.

However, MemTest86 (which also starts up from an EFI driver from a USB stick) still works fine with the MacBook Pro. So it seems this MacBook Pro is now somehow allergic to Apple's own EFI driver?

The same hardware (USB stick for Apple Hardware Test, external hard disk or USB stick for Apple Service Diagnostic) works fine with four other Mac portables, and two of them can access Apple Diagnostic (the 2014 and later version of Apple Hardware Test) from the Internet as they're supposed to (the others are too old to do so). So the problem is definitely something in this MacBook Pro.

The MacBook Pro was showing other problems as well; I sent it to a repair service (R&R in NY, recommended here), who said the GPU needed fixing (apparently common in this model), which they did, and said the logic board now tested all good. But it still "Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi'".

I spoke with somebody at Apple Support, who was mystified, suggested maybe it had something to do with the SSD? The SSD seems to work fine otherwise, starts up okay etc., and DriveDX (which gives detailed readout of SMART parameters) says it is good.

Anybody have any idea what the problem might be? I plan to sell this MacBook Pro but can't do so in good conscience as it is, even if it seems to be working okay otherwise.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Early 2013):
Error: 8000000000000003, Cannot load 'EFI/Drivers/TestSupport.efi'
Status: 0x00000003
When I try to load Apple Hardware Test from the Internet (startup with D key), it doesn't start, but shows a message:
which sits there for about five minutes, then it restarts into macOS.
You're not alone...
Apple Communities said:
Too bad Apple hasn't addressed the bug (typical...), but you can file Apple feedback, if you want to.

It's a very long shot, but if you want to try it, you could wipe the drive (SSD) completely and then try reinstalling the original macOS:
Apple said:
How to reinstall macOS from macOS Recovery

To start up from macOS Recovery, turn on your Mac and immediately press and hold one of the following combinations on your keyboard....
Shift-Option-⌘-R
Install the macOS that came with your Mac, or the closest version still available.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
When I try to load Apple Hardware Test from the Internet (startup with D key), it doesn't start, but shows a message:
Ah, hah! According to this StackExchange discussion, you must type Option-D at startup (despite Apple's contradictory documentation). Let us know if that works!
StackExchange said:
Why is Apple hardware test (AHT) not loading when pressing key D on system start?

I have an early 2011 Macbook Pro 13", which I first replaced the hard drive (totally blank and repartitioned), then installed Mountain Lion, then upgraded to Mavericks.
There appear to be two parts to the problem:
1) Swapping out a raw hard drive causes the loss of a hidden diagnostics/recovery partition (that I never bothered to look for, and which doesn't appear to be visible using Disk Utility.​
2) The Apple KB article for Apple Hardware Test - http://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201257 - appears to be incorrect. The correct sequence to invoke the AHT is:​
OPTION-D during a restart.​
Performing a restart and holding OPTION-D eventually produced a "Internet Recovery" screen, and then automatically started the AHT by itself (the quaint, OS9-styled screen).
 


Ah, hah! According to this StackExchange discussion, you must type Option-D at startup (despite Apple's contradictory documentation). Let us know if that works!
Thanks. It appears (from Apple's link) that starting with "D" launches Apple Hardware Test from your recovery partition. Option-D does an Internet Recovery to re-generate that partition first.

It would appear that Andrew (and many others) don't have a working Apple Hardware Test in their recovery partition. Sounds like some macOS update since system installation (Mojave?) failed to update AHT along with the rest of the system, resulting in the symptoms reported here.

Sloppy, Apple. Really sloppy.
 



My older MacBook Pro has a built-in camera in the display. Suddenly, the camera stopped working. PhotoBooth says "no camera detected," as does Skype. I restarted, zapped the PRAM and booted into Safe Start. No joy. Does anyone have ideas on how to revive the camera?
 



I'm looking forward to seeing the iFixit teardown.
And here it is: MacBook Pro 15" Touch Bar 2019 Teardown. MacFixIt writes:

…the fundamental problem with this laptop remains—if the slightest thing ever goes wrong, you’ll be replacing half the machine. Even if the keyboard is perfect this time, you’re taking a gamble on everything else. Our advice? Save your money.​
With that, you can probably guess where this laptop lands on the repairability scale…​
Even the SSD is now soldered to the logic board; nothing is replaceable or upgradable.
 



This is not surprising. Apple said that this latest model is effectively a speed-bump from the 2018 model, and the teardown proves it. Hopefully the updated keyboard is more reliable.

As for the SSD being non-replaceable, this is not surprising. The MacBook Pro hasn't had a replaceable SSD since 2015 and the MacBook Air dropped it in 2018. So I would've been shocked if this model had re-introduced it.
 


I picked up my base-model 2019 MacBook Pro 15" from the local Apple Store this past Saturday. I've been using it exclusively for work purposes since then. I won't go into all the details about its wicked performance, but I will say this: The keyboard is, in my not so humble opinion, subtly, but welcomingly, better. There is a more tactile feedback when typing on it, and it doesn't seem nearly as loud at the 2016-2018 models. As for longevity, I'll have to wait and see.
 


To avoid my daughter stepping in the Apple Laptop Minutiae, can someone confirm that this model of MacBook Air is indeed the 7,2 which still has removable SSD and has the pre-debacle keyboard?

It would appear to me to be so, as it still has Thunderbolt 2, the smaller trackpad (that seems to be another newer obsession parallel to the thinness virus...) and, based on OWC's upgrade listings, i.e. CPU speeds available, has to be the 7,2.
 


To avoid my daughter stepping in the Apple Laptop Minutiae, can someone confirm that this model of MacBook Air is indeed the 7,2 which still has removable SSD and has the pre-debacle keyboard?
It would appear to me to be so, as it still has Thunderbolt 2, the smaller trackpad (that seems to be another newer obsession parallel to the thinness virus...) and, based on OWC's upgrade listings, i.e. CPU speeds available, has to be the 7,2.
Yes; this is the 2017 model (good keyboard, USB 3, SD Card slot, non-Retina display, easily-replaced SSD) - the last MacBook (Air or otherwise) that was designed with some semblance of usability in mind.
 




I just purchased two 15" 2012 MacBook Pros for my sons last week at an eBay auction, one for $300 and the other for $335 (there was a listing error in the $335 posting, as the HD was actually 500GB and not 750GB, but the seller immediately emailed me and knocked $35 off the purchase price).
Both 15" 2012 2.3Ghz MacBook Pros arrived last Friday (one was a glossy screen and the other matte). They looked fine externally. We checked all the ports, booted them up from the internal hard drive - no problems found. We then took out the spinning hard drives and added their new pre-cloned Samsung 1TB SSDs with Sierra on them. These laptops are great!

I'm considering buying a 15" 2012 2.6Ghz MacBook Pro for myself via eBay auction. Unlike my two 2011 17" MacBook Pross, these 2012s can go to Mojave or Catalina, if desired (although I do not desire to). They also have the slightly faster CPU and 1GB VRAM vs. the 512MB in the 2.3GHz models.
 


Apple said:
MacBook Air and MacBook Pro updated for back-to-school season
Apple today updated MacBook Air, adding True Tone to its Retina display for a more natural viewing experience, and lowering the price to $1,099, with an even lower price of $999 for college students. In addition, the entry-level $1,299 13-inch MacBook Pro has been updated with the latest 8th-generation quad-core processors, making it two times more powerful than before. It also now features Touch Bar and Touch ID, a True Tone Retina display and the Apple T2 Security Chip, and is available for $1,199 for college students.
 


While these brilliant Apple designs feature a total of two ports, one of which is needed for charging:
In [my own use] the 2 ports aren't really a problem. Neither an external keyboard nor a mouse requires wired connections, and there are simple solutions to suit varying needs for monitors, external drives and so on. I've had a 4-port MacBook Pro since 2016 and rarely use more than two ports at a time. (It is sometimes nice to have the choice of left or right side connections, though.)

The base models' chintzy 128GB storage, and the pricey 256GB (+$200) or 512GB (+$400 vs. base) options, now those are certainly a problem.
 




It looks like Apple killed off the MacBook today, along with dropping prices on some drive upgrades.
Engadget said:
Quietly lost amidst some upgrades to the MacBook Air and MacBook Pro is a notable absence from Apple's online store: the 12-inch MacBook has been discontinued. The laptop was first introduced in 2015 and ushered in a new era of MacBook design for Apple -- it was the first to use USB-C, the first with the controversial and problematic butterfly keyboard, and the first Mac laptop without a glowing Apple logo in years. Apple has confirmed to Engadget that the 12-inch MacBook is no more.
 




Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Apple cut back a little on its insane price-gouging for SSD upgrades vs. prices for the standard M.2 SSDs that it refuses to use in favor of proprietary, non-upgradable, customer lock-in:
The Verge said:
Unfortunately, Apple's still gouging:

Size​
0.25 TB$200+n/a
0.5 TB​
$400+
$90​
1.0 TB​
$600+
$170​
2.0 TB​
$1000+
$549​

*For a more accurate comparison, add the value of Apple's 128GB standard flash, which is not included in Apple's upgrade price nor part of its upgraded capacity.
**Or subtract an equivalent value from the Samsung price.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Vlad Savov summarizes Apple's simplification yesterday of its laptop line-up:
The Verge said:
Apple has made shopping for MacBooks simple again
Yesterday, Apple did one of those sleepy summer spec refreshes on its MacBooks that usually passes without much fanfare or celebration. No designs have changed, the problematic butterfly keyboard is still around — albeit in an improved form — and the spec bumps are nice but not earthshaking. But the other thing Apple did was trim down its lineup significantly: it discontinued the 12-inch MacBook, finally stopped selling the ancient old-school MacBook Air to consumers, and it ditched the MacBook Escape, giving its entry-level MacBook Pro a Touch Bar. In this process of downsizing and simplifying its portfolio, Apple has returned to its strength of keeping things simple.
 


Apple cut back a little on its insane price-gouging for SSD upgrades vs. prices for the standard M.2 SSDs that it refuses to use in favor of proprietary, non-upgradable, customer lock-in... Unfortunately, Apple's still gouging:
Far from my intention to justify Apple gouging, but until we know exactly what chips Apple uses (MLC, TLC, QLC), speed and the number of read/writes they are rated for, it's not totally fair to compare with consumer NVMe. E.g. the Samsung 970 Pro 1TB is $300, almost twice the 970 EVO.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Far from my intention to justify Apple gouging, but until we know exactly what chips Apple uses (MLC, TLC, QLC), speed and the number of read/writes they are rated for, it's not totally fair to compare with consumer NVMe. E.g. the Samsung 970 Pro 1TB is $300, almost twice the 970 EVO.
While that's a valid point, I think any of us who have followed Apple for a long time could be pretty sure that Apple's not using the most expensive possible MLC for its internal flash. In fact, if you go back to iFixit teardowns, you can probably find out what Apple used in the past before the switch to its own controller/T2 system (Toshiba memory, I think). I'd be very surprised if the current internal flash is not standard TLC, just like the 970 EVO.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Size​
0.25 TB$200+n/a
0.5 TB​
$400+
$90​
1.0 TB​
$600+
$170​
2.0 TB​
$1000+
$549​
Far from my intention to justify Apple gouging, but until we know exactly what chips Apple uses (MLC, TLC, QLC), speed and the number of read/writes they are rated for, it's not totally fair to compare with consumer NVMe. E.g. the Samsung 970 Pro 1TB is $300, almost twice the 970 EVO.
While that's a valid point, I think any of us who have followed Apple for a long time could be pretty sure that Apple's not using the most expensive possible MLC for its internal flash. In fact, if you go back to iFixit teardowns, you can probably find out what Apple used in the past before the switch to its own controller/T2 system (Toshiba memory, I think). I'd be very surprised if the current internal flash is not standard TLC, just like the 970 EVO.
It looks like I may have been wrong about TLC, based on some older iFixit teardowns — Apple was using MLC flash for at least some of its laptops, though it's not clear what it's using for its T2-based flash currently.
But $300 for a 1TB premium-level Samsung SSD is still only half of Apple's rip-off upgrade price, while many Windows PCs let you easily install or upgrade with any standard M.2 NVMe SSD at far lower prices. And durability looks good for even the fast, inexpensive Samsung 970 EVO with its 5-year warranty and up to 1200 TBW. It also offers a 2TB version, double the size of the premium Samsung 970 Pro 1TB, with the same durability.
 


It looks like I may have been wrong about TLC, based on some iFixit teardowns — Apple has been using MLC flash for at least some of its laptops, though it's not clear what it's using for its T2-based flash currently. But $300 for a 1TB premium-level Samsung SSD is still only half of Apple's rip-off upgrade price, while many Windows PCs let you easily install or upgrade with any standard M.2 NVMe SSD at far lower prices.
Agreed. Additionally, there's Apple's "proprietary" SSD in the 2015 15" MacBook Pro. I paid a premium for a 1TB upgrade (OWC) because it wasn't quite "industry standard". I still love my trusty 2011 15" MacBook Pro - had to hack out the bad discrete graphics, but otherwise it's a champ.
 


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