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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
A few weeks back there were rumors around regarding a new, possibly 16-inch MacBook Pro. Was there any speculation about timing or potential release dates? My daughter's MacBook Pro appears to have died and I'm debating whether to buy now or wait a month or so.
Here's an update. (Two years?!)
MacRumors said:
Kuo Revises New 15-17" MacBook Pro Launch to First Half of 2021, 31" 6K Display Still Expected in Mid 2019
Kuo now predicts that Apple will release a new 15" to 17" MacBook Pro in the first half of 2021 and a new 10" to 12" iPad between the fourth quarter of 2020 and the first quarter of 2021. He still expects the 31.6" 6K Apple Display to launch in either the second or third quarter of this year.
 


Here's an update. (Two years?!)
Wow, that's a long time between drinks. Maybe they think it will take that long to fix the keyboards.

I'm really not sure what to do for my daughter - I don't want her to have the keyboard issues, but she needs a machine. She was also shocked to learn she would need dongles for everything - monitor (DVI), SD card, HDMI, USB3 backup drive.

Dell has some pretty decent offerings for less than the Macs, and most have a good range of ports. She could well be the first person in the family to have a Windows machine.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
She was also shocked to learn she would need dongles for everything - monitor (DVI), SD card, HDMI, USB3 backup drive.
I haven't found this to be a major issue, personally. USB3 drives simply have a different cable or a very simple adapter. A replacement monitor cable/adapter should be inexpensive. The lack of HDMI and SD card slots may be a bit more hassle when out and about. Back at home, a good Thunderbolt 3 dock should solve all these needs (though they aren't cheap).
 


... She was also shocked to learn she would need dongles for everything - monitor (DVI), SD card, HDMI, USB3 backup drive. ...
It isn't quite that bad. Dongles may be required for peripherals with captive USB3 cables; however, there are a number of relatively inexpensive sources for USB-C to DVI | HDMI | USB3 | DisplayPort | and more cables. These work for the newer MacBook Pro machines as well as the 2018 Mini. For many uses, it is not at all necessary to 'build' a compatible cable using a dongle connection mid-cable.

For the home/dorm office, there are many multiple interface docks available ranging from under $50 for the OWC Travel Dock to $hundreds for docks with dozens of ports. The OWC Travel Dock that travels with my MacBook Pro has HDMI and SD card capabilities. My USB-3 CF and SD card reader travels with my camera, along with a short USB-C to USB 3 micro cable.
 


I'm really not sure what to do for my daughter - I don't want her to have the keyboard issues, but she needs a machine. She was also shocked to learn she would need dongles for everything - monitor (DVI), SD card, HDMI, USB3 backup drive.
After her last computer failure, my daughter bought a Chromebook. It's the first computer purchase after years of Macs provided by me. The Macs were too expensive. She wanted an Air but couldn't justify the price in comparison.

Apparently, lots of people her age (out of college a few years) are buying these--they don't care about Google either way, and they don't care about actual computers as long as a limited number of things work, like a spreadsheet or text program for resumes. Her generation loves the iPhone and not the overpriced boxes on offer. If Apple leaves the box business, many, many people will not give a damn. Pricing already left them behind.
 


Dell has some pretty decent offerings for less than the Macs, and most have a good range of ports. She could well be the first person in the family to have a Windows machine.
Honestly, if she needs a fully functional computer, get a "PC" laptop. My department at work has been largely Mac-based since forever, but more and more are switching over to WIndows laptops from Dell or Linux laptops from System76, simply because the plethora of usable ports on them (including a place for a security cable) make them far better choices for a "real" work environment.

Paying a premium for an Apple laptop (and all of the problems that go along with them these days) and then having pay hundreds more for adapters and docks to make them usable simply isn't palatable anymore.
 


It isn't quite that bad. Dongles may be required for peripherals with captive USB3 cables; however, there are a number of relatively inexpensive sources for USB-C to DVI | HDMI | USB3 | DisplayPort | and more cables. These work for the newer MacBook Pro machines as well as the 2018 Mini. For many uses, it is not at all necessary to 'build' a compatible cable using a dongle connection mid-cable. For the home/dorm office, there are many multiple interface docks available ranging from under $50 for the OWC Travel Dock to $hundreds for docks with dozens of ports. The OWC Travel Dock that travels with my MacBook Pro has HDMI and SD card capabilities. My USB-3 CF and SD card reader travels with my camera, along with a short USB-C to USB 3 micro cable.
When we looked at the cost of buying Apple-branded dongles (unlikely, but revealing), it was close to $200 AUD for what she needed. She's studying film and video at university, and she regularly uses SD cards and presents with HDMI. Her backups are all USB3, and she has a Thunderbolt 2 drive she can use for video files.

But cost aside, it's the hassle of carrying them around everywhere. She takes buses and trains to the university every day, and it's just extra stuff to carry and store (or lose).

As as aside, the university used to use Final Cut for all their editing, but they've recently switched to Premier. I guess that makes a move to Windows that little bit easier. Maybe they've had enough, too.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
She's studying film and video at university, and she regularly uses SD cards and presents with HDMI. Her backups are all USB3, and she has a Thunderbolt 2 drive she can use for video files.
This $900 Dell Gaming laptop probably has everything she needs, including discrete GPU and good Premiere video editing performance, lacking only Thunderbolt 2, but it has 10Gbps USB 3.

A newer model includes Thunderbolt 3 and 6-core, 8th-generation i7 at $929 $899.99 [checked Apr. 10].

In stark contrast to Apple's designs, these open up for easy access to upgradable/replaceable internal components with removal of a single screw, plus they have good keyboards (with a numeric keypad) and good cooling (at the expense of thinness).
 
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This $900 Dell Gaming laptop probably has everything she needs, including discrete GPU and good Premiere video editing performance, lacking only Thunderbolt 2 support (but it has 10Gbps USB 3). ...
Yes, it looks nice. We've been looking at the XPS 13 (her current MacBook Pro is 13"). For ~$2k AUD she gets 16GB/512GB 8th Gen (I'd also get 6000 Qantas frequent flyer points :). The equivalent Mac is about $2900 running a 7th gen chip - almost 50% more.
 


Honestly, if she needs a fully functional computer, get a "PC" laptop. My department at work has been largely Mac-based since forever, but more and more are switching over to WIndows laptops from Dell or Linux laptops from System76, simply because the plethora of usable ports on them (including a place for a security cable) make them far better choices for a "real" work environment. Paying a premium for an Apple laptop (and all of the problems that go along with them these days) and then having pay hundreds more for adapters and docks to make them usable simply isn't palatable anymore.
This really needs to be evaluated on a case by case basis. Someone not very tech-savvy and unfamiliar with Windows (and comfortable in macOS) would not be well served by getting a PC, unless they have someone to support them.
 


... we looked at the cost of buying Apple-branded dongles (unlikely, but revealing), it was close to $200 AUD for what she needed. She's studying film and video at university, and she regularly uses SD cards and presents with HDMI. Her backups are all USB3, and she has a Thunderbolt 2 drive she can use for video files. But cost aside, it's the hassle of carrying them around everywhere. She takes buses and trains to the university every day, and it's just extra stuff to carry and store (or lose).
As Jim Cutler mentions above, there are economical choices for breakout boxes/dongles. Right after getting my 2016 MacBook Pro, I purchased for $70 US or so a featherweight, small (115mm x 45mm x 16 mm) unit that has powered USB-C, SD Card slot, HDMI, 2x USB [3.0], and Gigabit Ethernet. On the go, it fits in my computer carrying case or a pocket. I also carry a single USB C-USB Type A dongle, plus a short USB [3] cable, should I need to plug in a thumb drive or a"regular" USB device.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This really needs to be evaluated on a case by case basis. Someone not very tech-savvy and unfamiliar with Windows (and comfortable in macOS) would not be well served by getting a PC, unless they have someone to support them.
That's a very good point, but the next question is: Does this also apply to Chromebooks, or do they represent a simpler, more attractive alternative to macOS than Windows does? Here are some issues that came up for friends and family members in exactly that sort of situation:

First, and perhaps most importantly, you're right that it's all about support (which I can personally provide at a high level for Macs but barely at all for Windows). Chrome OS radically simplifies support and has proven an ideal solution for a friend's mother, who lives several hours away, even though he’s a Windows expert.

When someone has years and years of critical documents stored on a Mac, these aren't easily usable, migrated, nor stored on a Chromebook. So the support advantages of Chromebooks can actually turn into a liability and a very high labor cost (for both client and provider) to migrate from macOS (or Windows) to Chrome OS.

A third problem is Internet availability, because a Chromebook assumes, and is dependent on, Internet access. This ruled out the option for another friend's mother in a rural location with very poor Internet availability.

Fourth is Chrome's inability to run non-Web apps. This is often a showstopper for people who need even one or two specific apps only available for Windows or macOS.
 


That's a very good point, but the next question is: Does this also apply to Chromebooks, or do they represent a simpler, more attractive alternative to macOS than Windows does? Here are some issues that came up for friends and family members in exactly that sort of situation...
The big difference being: with a Chromebook: everything you do on it goes back to the Google mothership. Everything. (We don't need no stinkin' privacy.) With all things Apple, not so much.
 


The big difference being: with a Chromebook: everything you do on it goes back to the Google mothership. Everything.
I was interested enough when Google started offering Chromebooks to buy the very first Samsung model sold to the public. It was supposed to run smoothly because of the minimal OS, but was, and remained, a grave disappointment because of its awful Intel Atom processor. The screen, keyboard, and battery were excellent....

I learned on that machine, and some subsequent purchases, that it is possible to run software locally. Had a very nice little simple word processor that, in theory, didn't connect upstream to Google.

Time moves on, and Google adds Android apps to Chromebooks. Given the amount of analytics in Android and Android apps, I'd presume they're phoning home. I've read it may be possible in ChromeOS Developer Mode to side-load Android apps, which would enable the more private app selection from F-Droid, but Developer Mode disables at least a part of the vaunted ChromeOS security feature set.

It has long been possible to install Linux distros on Chromebooks using the Crouton extension developed by one of Google's employees. I did that on an i3 Toshiba Chromebook and a ran a tailored-for-Crouton Ubuntu under ChromeOS. Again, possible only in the less secure Developer Mode. I just presumed, since Crouton was a ChromeOS extension running "inside" ChromeOS, Google could "watch" what I was doing. Never saw any tech site analysis of that, and I looked.

Now ChromeOS will run Linux and individual Linux apps in what amounts to a virtual machine. It remains a work in progress, and, again, I've seen no analysis of whether or not doing so provides additional privacy.

I've moved deeply enough into Linux that I'm no longer using Chromebooks. As long as I'm not using Chrome, the browser, I have some confidence Linux does provide some additional privacy, compared to ChromeOS, Windows, and even macOS (just ask Little Snitch).

I've given Chromebooks to friends and relatives to protect them from Windows. ChromeOS really is better for people who are malware magnets. Given the state of Window 10 privacy, they're probably no more exposed on a Chromebook, and their bank accounts should be safer.

macOS is less of a malware magnet than Windows, but it's an expensive option for folks who just want to read Facebook, check bank balances, and send emails. I've already given Chromebooks to most of the Windows malware magnets I know who won't pay for a Mac, and while I'm no longer using ChromeOS, I still recommend it for some users.

In the last couple of months, I've tried to gather information on how to be more secure and private while remaining connected to the Internet. G Suite can be HIPAA compatible, which doesn't seem particularly straightforward, but at least implies it is possible to use a Chromebook and maintain some privacy but clearly not at the consumer level with a personal Gmail account.

This privacy thing is very difficult. It isn't just Google that's insinuated itself so deeply into the 'net, and on our hardware it can follow most everyone. So has Facebook, Microsoft (Windows is everywhere), and Apple. Most of us use email services from one of these companies, or others possibly worse. Want privacy? You may be able to get it from Proton Mail if you encrypt everything, and send to other Proton users. Short of that, if you send an iCloud email through Apple to a Microsoft or Google email user, both sending and receiving sides have access to your content.

Not long ago I received a notice from AT&T that my old-fashioned landline had different terms and conditions AT&T had to adopt because it had purchased TimeWarner. The new privacy terms, as did the previous ones, enabled AT&T to use the metadata from my calls for marketing, meaning if I called a funeral home to find when a friend's service was scheduled, I might start receiving a deluge of marketing materials from cemeteries, funeral homes, insurance companies.... And darn, if it wasn't difficult to exercise my rights to opt out of that "benefit." Couldn't be done on my account page on AT&T's website but required a phone call eventually answered by an employee programmed to tell me I really wanted the "benefit" then make it difficult to opt out. Reminded of trying to call AOL and cancel an account.

Remember when Apple promoted "Apple Pay" as a way to protect privacy? All those tokens used to keep the store from tracking you by your name, and possibly even your credit card company from getting details of your purchases to track and use for marketing? Funny thing, every store that has an app for "customer rewards" blows right through that. And using one of those handy little key-tags from your pharmacy for your "rewards?" Use it when paying for a prescription, and forfeit that secret.
 


The Kuo note that is being referenced here is more focused on the timeline of Apple rolling out mini-LED (and micro-LED later?) displays than it is on the MacBook Pro. While Apple is currently using OLED displays in a large fraction of the iPhone and Watch line up, the rumors are that they want to eventually move to micro LEDs....

There are some laptops coming out this year that have OLED displays, but it looks like Apple is going to skip that tech and jump straight to mini/micro LEDs. Apple has filed some patents related to microLEDs and reportedly has in-house equipment to build research displays themselves (probably more of a bargaining chip to have them made to their standards than Apple jumping into the display panel business).

However, that is just the display. That are other parts of the laptop they could upgrade in far less than two years. It would be a bit odd to hold up the MacBook Pro completely to compose a large set of "big bang" changes that aren't necessarily coupled.

I think it is pretty likely that Apple will use these mini/micro LED displays the same way they used "Retina" displays about 7 years ago. There will be, at that point, very mature, more affordable "Retina", and Apple will use the "newness" of mini/micro LEDs to keep the prices on the rest of the line-up high (or higher).
 


The big difference being: with a Chromebook: everything you do on it goes back to the Google mothership. Everything. (We don't need no stinkin' privacy.) With all things Apple, not so much.
Are you sure? With each successive macOS version, the number of Little Snitch alerts for attempted connections to Apple servers that I see has increased markedly. It really seemed to take off after El Capitan. I suppose Apple would say this is all in the pursuit of a better user experience, but I am becoming more skeptical.
 


As as aside, the university used to use Final Cut for all their editing, but they've recently switched to Premier. I guess that makes a move to Windows that little bit easier. Maybe they've had enough, too.
To add to this aside but also add an Apple-or-not purchase perspective, my daughter is also doing video production as a major at her college in NY. There are Apple products involved in the hardware of the department but not in software - it's all Premiere.

She's due for her first new laptop in seven years, mostly because she will be working on her projects at home between semesters and needs a well-deserved upgrade from her modestly appointed 2012 MacBook Pro. It's more likely than not she'll be the first one in the family to get a new, production-capable laptop that's not a Mac. Even though I could pass down my 2015 MacBook Pro and get a new one, the odds are that it will be a tricked-out Dell suited for video editing, and she's looking forward to that, no Apple emotional ties at all.

These days 16 GB of RAM isn't a luxury if you're doing audio or video on a serious level, and neither is a 1TB internal SSD. With those as starting points, and moving from there to not needing to carry a dock with its power supply and cables everywhere, it's really an Apple hardware purchase that needs convincing in this longtime Apple ecosystem family, not the other way around anymore.
 


That's a very good point, but the next question is: Does this also apply to Chromebooks, or do they represent a simpler, more attractive alternative to macOS than Windows does?
If simpler is a goal, but privacy is a concern, another option is an iPad with a keyboard case. But again, it's all a balance of the user's requirements and capabilities, and what support they have.
 


I've moved deeply enough into Linux that I'm no longer using Chromebooks. As long as I'm not using Chrome, the browser, I have some confidence Linux does provide some additional privacy, compared to ChromeOS, Windows, and even macOS (just ask Little Snitch).
Linux, the OS, doesn't phone home for anything. But some distributions will include applications that do. Most of the time it takes the form of auto-update daemons, which periodically connect to the distro's servers to check for and install updates. There may also be communication if you have apps that synchronize with cloud data.

The big difference here is that all of this communication can be disabled either by configuring the app/package or by uninstalling it.

In the Windows world, some OS features can be uninstalled, but definitely not all. I don't think Apple gives you the option to uninstall any macOS features (and disabling doesn't always stop the external communication).
Remember when Apple promoted "Apple Pay" as a way to protect privacy? All those tokens used to keep the store from tracking you by your name, and possibly even your credit card company from getting details of your purchases to track and use for marketing?
I don't remember any such promotion. I know Apple has promoted Apple Pay as being secure, in that a data breach won't result in your card information being stolen. The tokens aren't so much for privacy (the vendor still gets your name), but to prevent a third party from using your device-specific account number (DAN) to create unauthorized transactions.

The only "privacy" feature I can think of is the ability to remove and re-register a card, generating a new DAN. This might prevent some amount of tracking, if the store is tracking your card number, but that's not a whole lot. Apple Pay does not generate a new DAN for every transaction, so it can be used to track you just like any other card number, unless you manually change it a lot.
With each successive macOS version, the number of Little Snitch alerts for attempted connections to Apple servers that I see has increased markedly. It really seemed to take off after El Capitan. I suppose Apple would say this is all in the pursuit of a better user experience, but I am becoming more skeptical.
The industry as a whole (Apple, Microsoft, Google and many others) is focusing more and more on cloud services and connectivity. Apple, for example, provides quite a lot of software that relies heavily on cloud services (music, photos, notes, file storage, keychain, address book, maps, books, App Store, software updates, Back To My Mac, Find Friends, Find My Mac, FaceTime, and many more). Some require use of an iCloud account (which most people have, either because macOS insisted or because people have bought content from iTunes), and some use services independent of iCloud.

All of these necessarily involve communication (both foreground and background) with remote servers.

Is all of this necessary for the software to work? Not all the time, but some functionality certainly requires it. Is there unnecessary communication? Almost certainly. Does Apple collect data for analytics? Definitely - they say so in their license terms. Do they keep the collected data private/anonymous/aggregated? They say they do, and I haven't yet seen evidence showing otherwise. Do other vendors violate their privacy policies? Definitely - you only have to read the news to see plenty of examples.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
If simpler is a goal, but privacy is a concern, another option is an iPad with a keyboard case. But again, it's all a balance of the user's requirements and capabilities, and what support they have.
I support multiple non-technical people using iPads, and I can't stand doing it anymore, as Apple has made it more and more difficult by constantly changing and complicating the user interface, dumping unwanted stuff into the device, making remote access virtually impossible, creating nightmarish security changes, update failures, demands you can't deny, etc.

Bottom line: I will no longer recommend an iPad to anyone I have to support.
 


This really needs to be evaluated on a case by case basis. Someone not very tech-savvy and unfamiliar with Windows (and comfortable in macOS) would not be well served by getting a PC, unless they have someone to support them.
My usual advice to people looking to get a computer and who are not particularly invested in a particular platform or are not particularly technically inclined has been to choose a platform primarily based on the availability of support. Whether through strange choices by Apple or improvements by other providers, the days when Macs provided a dramatically superior experience to novices or the less technical are long gone.

I'd also like to offer a bit of advice to my fellow MacInTouchers (hmmm... not sure that's the best word): Although many of us enjoy providing the occasional bit of informal support to family and friends, sometimes the best thing to do is to "just say no," especially when alternate sources of support are available. In the case of the original poster's college student, perhaps the best thing is to direct the student to the college's IT support department when issues arise. Sure, the quality of support can vary from day to day and person to person, but it often can be surprisingly good.

This is even more the case if you act as the informal help desk at work. Think hard about exactly how much benefit you and your employer get from you performing unofficial help desk duties versus finding ways to improve the support provided by the people who actually get paid to provide support. Early in my career, I found that when I stopped being so free with informal support and advice, others actually became more tech savvy, and, to my surprise, I ended up getting treated with more respect, and I was able to get more of my own work done.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I support multiple non-technical people using iPads, and I can't stand doing it anymore, as Apple has made it more and more difficult by constantly changing and complicating the user interface, dumping unwanted stuff into the device, making remote access virtually impossible, creating nightmarish security changes, update failures, demands you can't deny, etc. Bottom line: I will no longer recommend an iPad to anyone I have to support.
By contrast, support for friends running Linux (Ubuntu 16 LTS) has been incredibly great for me - virtually no problems at all! And it's been no cost for my friends, with a free old PC and no software expenses (except one reasonably priced, cross=platform app they needed). A USB WiFi adapter failed, so we needed a new one, but that was an easy fix.
 


By contrast, support for friends running Linux (Ubuntu 16 LTS) has been incredibly great for me - virtually no problems at all! And it's been no cost for my friends, with a free old PC and no software expenses (except one reasonably priced, cross=platform app they needed). A USB WiFi adapter failed, so we needed a new one, but that was an easy fix.
As part of the adventure to [assess] Apple alternatives, I installed Linux Mint (Ubuntu-based) onto a 2008 iMac today. Took about 30 minutes from download to booting up.

At this stage everything is working except the bluetooth keyboard. It's familiar enough that I'm not getting lost, but I'm sure it will take a bit of work to become truly comfortable with it.

Monday's task is to install Apache, Nginx, PHP and WordPress. It will be interesting to see where it ends up.
 


I don't think Apple gives you the option to uninstall any macOS features
By disabling SIP, it is possible to remove some of Apple's applications that are not integral to the OS. In the past I've removed Game Center, Spotlight, Safari, Photo Booth, the iWork set, Maps, iBooks, Calendar, Mail, Messages - lately Apple has made that more difficult. Game Center used to be an application that was actively alarming Little Snitch. Now it's a process I've no idea how to remove. Spotlight, which I once completely removed through the Terminal, also seems beyond my reach.
I know Apple has promoted Apple Pay as being secure, in that a data breach won't result in your card information being stolen. The tokens aren't so much for privacy (the vendor still gets your name),
ZDNet said:
Apple Pay isn't magic, and it isn't 'private'
The merchant knows what specific goods or services were purchased for that amount, but not who bought them.
Apple says it is possible to affiliate merchant rewards cards with your Apple Pay methods. Do that and you're subject to the merchant's privacy policy. Not a good idea if you're paying for a medicine at the pharmacy for a condition you're rather keep under a HIPAA blanket and away from data miners.
 


By disabling SIP, it is possible to remove some of Apple's applications that are not integral to the OS. In the past I've removed Game Center, Spotlight, Safari, ...
I would consider that hacking the OS. :-)

What I am describing is the fact that Windows provides you an official GUI-based mechanism to turn Windows features on or off, and there are quite a lot of optional features on the list. (If you didn't know about this, you should go look now - there are almost certainly things you're going to want to change!)
 


I support multiple non-technical people using iPads, and I can't stand doing it anymore, as Apple has made it more and more difficult by constantly changing and complicating the user interface, dumping unwanted stuff into the device, making remote access virtually impossible, creating nightmarish security changes, update failures, demands you can't deny, etc. Bottom line: I will no longer recommend an iPad to anyone I have to support.
Is there a comparable, or – dare I say it? – better alternative in the Android world?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Is there a comparable, or – dare I say it? – better alternative in the Android world?
That's a great question, but I haven't spent any time with Android tablets, so I don't know. For me, Android has too many security problems, which is why I'm still using (and paying excessively for) iPhones myself.
 


Apple has made it more and more difficult by constantly changing and complicating the user interface, dumping unwanted stuff into the device, making remote access virtually impossible, creating nightmarish security changes, update failures, demands you can't deny, etc.
Bottom line: I will no longer recommend an iPad to anyone I have to support.
Although I was eager, at the iPad's birth, to jump on that bandwagon, I never really found myself able to do so. My work involves a lot of "creating" (mostly words, but also tons of "original" animated slides containing images and movies for Keynote presentations, and original documents with graphics and images, etc.). I have found the iPad interface difficult and kludgy... and, for that reason, it slowed me down. I wanted to love it, but never could. Today, my iPads languish as consumption devices (browsing, crosswords, etc.) rather than anything involving writing or graphics creation. Not even email.

For me, a "late 2013" Retina 13" MacBook Pro, with 16GB memory and a 500GB flash drive (not "fusion") has proven an incredible workhorse. Fast, lightweight, extraordinarily flexible (with USB, memory card slot, magnetic power supply connector and two (old) Thunderbolt ports... even an earphone jack and a built-in HDMI port). Keyboard that never fails and feels great. Bright, readable monitor. Great battery life (though it's beginning to show its age). Runs Mojave beautifully and fast.

It was expensive when I bought it, but has been worth every penny since then. I'm gonna miss it when I'm forced to "upgrade" to the less functional MacBook Pros available currently.
 


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