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My 2011 MacBook Air 11" simply can't keep up with the demands photography is putting on it. I'm close to buying a fully loaded 13" MacBook Pro that will allow me to do basic editing on the road. Having to deliver while elsewhere is relatively new but seems to be growing. The machine looks good, but I am concerned about the keyboard. In searching about, I'm not finding nearly the complaints made about earlier models.

So the question. Does anyone have data on how these keyboards are working? This is a serious investment and I don't change laptops very often. Any advice greatly appreciated.
 


I'm close to buying a fully loaded 13" MacBook Pro that will allow me to do basic editing on the road. ... Does anyone have data on how these keyboards are working?
My feeling is that this keyboard is much better.

I had a 2016 MacBook, which I loved for its size but which had the keyboard replaced twice, and would have had it replaced a third time, had it not died in a rainstorm. I never had the "duplicate" problems, simply keys that did not operate.

I had a 2018 MacBook Pro, which never had a keyboard replacement but did have some transient key issues with the modifier keys on the lower left. I was happy to give it to a coworker (too heavy for me) and am now using the 2019 MacBook Air. I've had zero key problems. People have complained about the key travel but I personally haven't found it to be a problem.

It's just one person, so isn't really "data", but I hope this helps.
 


This is completely incorrect. Apple doesn't deserialize anything. This is the fault of the person who did the repair. When the computer is repaired, they are supposed to use a specialist tool that only Apple Authorized Service Providers have access to, to reserialize the logic board with the original serial number. If you want to, I'd suggest going back to the original repair location to get this fixed.
Graham - thank you for your suggestion. I was able to have the original AASP do the work and the serial number is no longer "unavailable". The technician said he couldn't understand how that happened, since the motherboard hadn't been removed.
 


My 2011 MacBook Air 11" simply can't keep up with the demands photography is putting on it. I'm close to buying a fully loaded 13" MacBook Pro that will allow me to do basic editing on the road. Having to deliver while elsewhere is relatively new but seems to be growing. The machine looks good, but I am concerned about the keyboard. In searching about, I'm not finding nearly the complaints made about earlier models.

So the question. Does anyone have data on how these keyboards are working? This is a serious investment and I don't change laptops very often. Any advice greatly appreciated.
As we will see new MacBook Pros in the next few months with, allegedly, scissors-type keyboards, I'd advise waiting.
 



I tried to wait, but couldn’t any longer. As a Mac user since 1986, who has gotten numerous contacts to buy Macs, I bought a Dell XPS 15. Both the NVMe SSD and memory are useful-replaceable. Nice screen, very decent keyboard, camera back on the top of the laptop screen. Same price as refurbished 2015 MacBook Pro.

Apple could do a lot better than they have recently.
 


I tried to wait, but couldn’t any longer. As a Mac user since 1986, who has gotten numerous contacts to buy Macs, I bought a Dell XPS 15. Both the NVMe SSD and memory are useful-replaceable. Nice screen, very decent keyboard, camera back on the top of the laptop screen. Same price as refurbished 2015 MacBook Pro.
Apple could do a lot better than they have recently.
How is the trackpad? My older Dell laptop has a lousy trackpad that has a "ricochet" (scrolling reverses like a spring) that is only controlled when you lift one of the two fingers doing the scrolling near the end of the scrolling drag. As it's a Synaptics, it's disappointing; however, I think it's Microsoft's software that is the culprit.
 


I tried to wait, but couldn’t any longer. As a Mac user since 1986, who has gotten numerous contacts to buy Macs, I bought a Dell XPS 15. Both the NVMe SSD and memory are useful-replaceable. Nice screen, very decent keyboard, camera back on the top of the laptop screen. Same price as refurbished 2015 MacBook Pro.

Apple could do a lot better than they have recently.
This is very true. I've been thinking about this a lot. For me, it's the loss of many small quality-of-life issues (I know, we've discussed these things many times):
- elimination of MagSafe​
- no user-replaceable memory​
- no user-replaceable storage​
- no user-replaceable battery​
- no power/sleep external indicator​
- loss of function keys (give me a discrete ESC and volume/brightness keys at the very least! TouchBar is a poor substitute)​
- "bigger" but not "better" trackpad; accidental activation happens all the time​
- changes to power-on status (no boot chime, removal of discrete power button, power on clamshell open or any key press)​
- elimination of SD card reader​
- elimination of network port​
- redesign of laptop power brick (lack of included separable AC power cable to brick, removal of cable management legs)​

Having to pay Apple's premium for this (cost-driven?) loss of functionality is galling. macOS is still "better" then Windows or Linux desktop - but not by much.
 


It sure sounds like a lemon Mac, but if you haven't experimented with sleep settings, that might be one more experiment to run (e.g. try setting everything to prevent sleep, nap, etc.)
I got the Macbook Pro back with this note: "Replaced rear vent, antenna. Cable causing issue." They had it in the shop for less than 48 hours, from received to shipped out again. First thing I tried to do was an Internet fresh install, since Apple had the account password. Failed. Called Apple Support.

It took half an hour to get the first download, the recovery partition. Apple said it should have been about 6 minutes. Tried to install the OS, and the estimated time kept climbing. I think the estimate was up to about 6 hours, and the install timed out or I gave up. Apple Support said there is some problem, and they will send me a new box to return the computer.

While waiting for Monday, I created a USB boot install thumb drive. Turns out it is no longer possible to do an install without an internet connection. I managed to get enough wireless to get past that after multiple tries, but then the installer was not able to find the internal drive. It wasn't showing up in Disk Utility, either. Maybe when I erased the drive (I wanted to do an overwrite, which the Macbook Pro didn't have as an option but claims to work from my Mini when I hooked it up in Target Mode), it wiped so much of the SSD the disk became useless? Back to Apple today if FedEx gets me the box in time.

One very odd step. I use a wireless network without password, but the install connection attempt was demanding a password for that network. Apple Support said an encrypted connection is required for an internet install. It certainly was not when I did my several reinstalls the first time I got it back, but those were reinstalls, not onto a clean disk.

Two questions:
1. Is it true I need an internet connection to Apple to do a truly fresh install?​
2. Is it true that the connection needs to be encrypted?​
 


This is very true. I've been thinking about this a lot. For me, it's the loss of many small quality-of-life issues (I know, we've discussed these things many times):
- elimination of MagSafe​
- no user-replaceable memory​
- no user-replaceable storage​
- no user-replaceable battery​
- no power/sleep external indicator​
- loss of function keys (give me a discrete ESC and volume/brightness keys at the very least! TouchBar is a poor substitute)​
- "bigger" but not "better" trackpad; accidental activation happens all the time​
- changes to power-on status (no boot chime, removal of discrete power button, power on clamshell open or any key press)​
- elimination of SD card reader​
- elimination of network port​
- redesign of laptop power brick (lack of included separable AC power cable to brick, removal of cable management legs)​
Having to pay Apple's premium for this (cost-driven?) loss of functionality is galling. macOS is still "better" then Windows or Linux desktop - but not by much.
I do miss the sleep light. I do not need a network port, as WiFi is plenty fast, and I have a USB-C to Ethernet adaptor. With 2 TB of really fast SSD, I have not needed more space, and with Thunderbolt 3, an external SSD device can be really fast in a very small enclosure.

I do miss the Magsafe, although there are so-so equivalents made possible by not having a permanent cord connection to the brick. I like the power brick being in three parts - no connector cord failing at the computer connection and requiring a new brick. I like the ability to charge on either side of the laptop which can mitigate somewhat the lack of Magsafe. The long battery life also mitigates the lack of Magsafe.

And probably the most useful for me is being able to automatically turn on the screensaver/sleep quickly during idle periods and then instantly activate the computer using my finger — no password required.
 


... Is it true I need an internet connection to Apple to do a truly fresh install? ...
I installed Mojave on two 2013 MacBook Airs without an Internet connection. The MacBook Airs were donated to a client, but the company donating them neglected to un-enroll them from their Apple account.

When I tried to install Mojave with an Internet connection, it insisted on being set up using the company's profile, but I was asked not to bug the company unless absolutely necessary.

I tried installing Mojave without an Internet connection, and it worked properly. (Once the install was in progress, I plugged in a Thunderbolt-Ethernet adapter.)
 


GBH

I tried to wait, but couldn’t any longer. As a Mac user since 1986, who has gotten numerous contacts to buy Macs, I bought a Dell XPS 15. Both the NVMe SSD and memory are useful-replaceable. Nice screen, very decent keyboard, camera back on the top of the laptop screen. Same price as refurbished 2015 MacBook Pro.
Apple could do a lot better than they have recently.
I usually just go on to Craigslist Los Angeles and look for a MacBook Pro mid-2012.

A 15-inch Core i7 is the boss of MacBook Pros. Just gotta find one that looks like its been handled with care. Non-Retinas are best! (Screen artifacts.) I have two and have maxed out the RAM to 16 GB and thrown in whatever SSD I want. I also took out the DVD and run with two drives. (Thanks OWC.)

The MacBook Pro mid-2012 is a workhorse, and they run about $400 to $500 these days on Craigslist. I guess it has to do with the so-called battery issue on planes. Oh, well! Their loss, my gain!

I don't know what I'll buy next, but the new stuff isn't what it used to be, but neither is Apple. The MacBook Pro mid-2012 is a great machine, if you can find a good one. Not sure if the Macbook Pro has enough graphics hardware to do what you want, however. Just thought I'd pipe in with my thoughts.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I usually just go on to Craigslist Los Angeles and look for a MacBook Pro mid-2012. A 15-inch Core i7 is the boss of MacBook Pros.
You might also like the 2015 MacBook Pro, which still has normal ports (except for Ethernet) and a good keyboard, with decent integrated graphics and faster SSD (AHCI or NVMe, depending on what macOS you're using). That's my workhorse, for what it's worth.
 


I installed Mojave on two 2013 MacBook Airs without an Internet connection. The MacBook Airs were donated to a client, but the company donating them neglected to un-enroll them from their Apple account.
When I tried to install Mojave with an Internet connection, it insisted on being set up using the company's profile, but I was asked not to bug the company unless absolutely necessary.
I tried installing Mojave without an Internet connection, and it worked properly. (Once the install was in progress, I plugged in a Thunderbolt-Ethernet adapter.)
Sorry, I failed to mention this time that the MacBook Pro is a 2018 edition with that T2 wonder chip.
 


I got the Macbook Pro back with this note: "Replaced rear vent, antenna. Cable causing issue." They had it in the shop for less than 48 hours, from received to shipped out again. First thing I tried to do was an Internet fresh install, since Apple had the account password. Failed. Called Apple Support.

It took half an hour to get the first download, the recovery partition. Apple said it should have been about 6 minutes. Tried to install the OS, and the estimated time kept climbing. I think the estimate was up to about 6 hours, and the install timed out or I gave up. Apple Support said there is some problem, and they will send me a new box to return the computer.

While waiting for Monday, I created a USB boot install thumb drive. Turns out it is no longer possible to do an install without an internet connection. I managed to get enough wireless to get past that after multiple tries, but then the installer was not able to find the internal drive. It wasn't showing up in Disk Utility, either. Maybe when I erased the drive (I wanted to do an overwrite, which the Macbook Pro didn't have as an option but claims to work from my Mini when I hooked it up in Target Mode), it wiped so much of the SSD the disk became useless? Back to Apple today if FedEx gets me the box in time.

One very odd step. I use a wireless network without password, but the install connection attempt was demanding a password for that network. Apple Support said an encrypted connection is required for an internet install. It certainly was not when I did my several reinstalls the first time I got it back, but those were reinstalls, not onto a clean disk.

Two questions:
1. Is it true I need an internet connection to Apple to do a truly fresh install?​
2. Is it true that the connection needs to be encrypted?​
Not sure if Apple still has the same policy, but when your Mac is covered by AppleCare, they will attempt to fix it three times. If you must return it for a fourth attempt, the "secret handshake" has been to say to the AppleCare rep you speak with "Gee, I just don't have any confidence in this Mac any more!" In the past (after three unsuccessful repair attempts), those words have initiated an immediate transfer to Apple's Customer Relations people where they immediately arrange for a new machine to be sent as a replacement. I've had three Macs over the years that have fallen into this category, and, indeed, Apple has replaced them without anything more than those words above.
 


Two questions:
1. Is it true I need an internet connection to Apple to do a truly fresh install?​
2. Is it true that the connection needs to be encrypted?​
1. Yes and no. If you have a working recovery partition, then you shouldn't need an internet connection, but if the recovery partition is missing/not working, the Mac will default to an internet connection with Internet Recovery. Even if you do have a working local recovery partition, it also depends on how you invoke recovery mode. From my Using the macOS Recovery Modes article over on MacStrategy:
  • Hold down the Command + R keys: Reinstall the latest macOS / OS X that was installed on your Mac, without upgrading to a later version
  • or hold down the Command + Option + R keys: Upgrade to the latest macOS / OS X that is compatible with your Mac
  • or hold down the Command + Option + Shift + R keys: Reinstall the macOS / OS X that came with your Mac, or the version closest to it that is still available - requires mac OS 10.12.4 or later.
The latter two methods require an internet connection. These are referenced by Apple.

2. Yes, it is true the connection needs to be encrypted. From my Using the macOS Internet Recovery Mode article over on MacStrategy:
  • You can only connect to a wireless network that uses WPA/WPA2 authentication - it does not work over WEP.
  • Make sure you have your Apple ID and password available.
I can't find this on Apple's support site now, but it was obviously listed somewhere for me to put it in my article. I believe the reason for the requirement is that using Internet Recovery requires your Apple ID and password to be submitted to Apple for them to check the Mac eligibility for the OS download. Doing that over an unencrypted network would be bad.

#recovery #install #AppleID
 



Thanks for the informative post! One follow-up question: if I restore from the recovery partition, does it restore to the OS that shipped with the machine, or do updates also update the recovery partition?
macOS / OS X updates/upgrades should also update the recovery partition. Thus, booting to the Recovery Partition (holding down the Command + R keys at boot) should "reinstall the latest macOS / OS X that was installed on your Mac."
That's assuming the local Recovery Partition is correctly up-to-date from your own macOS / OS X installations and is working correctly - it's common for it to not update correctly/be corrupted.

The easiest way to tell what your Recovery Partition is, is to boot to the startup manager (hold down the Option, a.k.a. Alt, key at boot). This should show you the Recovery Partition and its (macOS / OS X) version.

To specifically restore to the original macOS / OS X version that your Mac came with (if that is different to what is currently installed) requires the specific holding down of the Command + Option + Shift + R keys (this requires an internet connection and macOS 10.12.4 or later to have been installed on the Mac at some point in the past - i.e. the boot ROM has been updated to handle the Command + Option + Shift + R keypress option and subsequent Internet Recovery facility).
 


How is the trackpad? My older Dell laptop has a lousy trackpad that has a "ricochet" (scrolling reverses like a spring) that is only controlled when you lift one of the two fingers doing the scrolling near the end of the scrolling drag. As it's a Synaptics, it's disappointing; however, I think it's Microsoft's software that is the culprit.
So far (after a week), the trackpad is fine. The XPS 15 has one Thunderbolt 3/USB-C port, to which I'll attach a hub when I need it, several USB 3.1 ports, VGA – so plenty for what I need. My desktop is still a Mac Pro (what I'm typing on now). What will I miss?

1. a site similar to MacInTouch, where I can find out details of hardware and software in a civil community​
2. I'll need to get familiar with replacements for some small-developer software. Obviously, Office and browsers are available to me, but I'll need something to replace GraphicConverter and a few others that I've used for over a decade. A few of them were 32-bit, and I would have needed to replace them anyway if I went past Mojave, which I don't plan to anytime soon on my remaining Macs.​

Not much else that I know of yet. I'd been using Parallels to run some PC software so had gotten 'used to' Windows and found Windows 10 to be not worse than the current macOS.

I can transfer files between laptop and desktop using Dropbox. I'll need to learn to back up and some other routine operations using Windows, but learning new tricks isn't a bad thing for an old dog to do.

If Apple came out with a laptop that was an 'Advance to the Past' (the opposite of 'Back to the Future'), I'd buy that next time around. But I doubt that's going to happen. If this laptop lasts long enough for me to want to upgrade the SSD and memory, I'll be happy. We'll see.

Apologies for the 'useful-replaceable' term in my last post, I was working on an iPad and must have misspelled 'user', resulting in the autocorrect version. But maybe it's not a bad mashup. What did I want in a laptop? Usefulness.
 



1. Yes and no. If you have a working recovery partition, then you shouldn't need an internet connection, but if the recovery partition is missing/not working, the Mac will default to an internet connection with Internet Recovery. Even if you do have a working local recovery partition, it also depends on how you invoke recovery mode. From my Using the macOS Recovery Modes article over on MacStrategy:
  • Hold down the Command + R keys: Reinstall the latest macOS / OS X that was installed on your Mac, without upgrading to a later version
  • or hold down the Command + Option + R keys: Upgrade to the latest macOS / OS X that is compatible with your Mac
  • or hold down the Command + Option + Shift + R keys: Reinstall the macOS / OS X that came with your Mac, or the version closest to it that is still available - requires mac OS 10.12.4 or later.
The latter two methods require an internet connection. These are referenced by Apple.

2. Yes, it is true the connection needs to be encrypted. From my Using the macOS Internet Recovery Mode article over on MacStrategy:
  • You can only connect to a wireless network that uses WPA/WPA2 authentication - it does not work over WEP.
  • Make sure you have your Apple ID and password available.
I can't find this on Apple's support site now, but it was obviously listed somewhere for me to put it in my article. I believe the reason for the requirement is that using Internet Recovery requires your Apple ID and password to be submitted to Apple for them to check the Mac eligibility for the OS download. Doing that over an unencrypted network would be bad.

#recovery #install #AppleID
According to Apple Support, I successfully downloaded the recovery partition or whatever it takes to start the reinstall of the operating system. That did not ask for Apple ID. Nor did it ask when I tried to start the reinstall of the OS. When I did a successful internet reinstall of the OS the first time I got it back, it didn't ask for any information from me at all and it worked over my non-password wireless network (not WEP, no security at all). On the other hand, since it demanded a password for the network maybe the firmware is so screwed up it didn't know what it was supposed to be doing in the earlier installs.

I tried the Command/R and Command/Option/R recoveries, I didn't know about the third one.

I still don't understand why, with my bootable USB full installer, I would need an internet connection.
 


I'll need to get familiar with replacements for some small-developer software. Obviously, Office and browsers are available to me, but I'll need something to replace GraphicConverter and a few others that I've used for over a decade. A few of them were 32-bit, and I would have needed to replace them anyway if I went past Mojave, which I don't plan to anytime soon on my remaining Macs.
The "AlternativeTo" website can be a good place to find useful alternatives to Mac software, and you can filter results by platform (Windows, Mac, Linux) and license type (freeware, open source, commercial, etc). For example, here is the page for GraphicConverter alternatives:
 


The "AlternativeTo" website can be a good place to find useful alternatives to Mac software, and you can filter results by platform (Windows, Mac, Linux) and license type (freeware, open source, commercial, etc). For example, here is the page for GraphicConverter alternatives:
Excellent backup/cloning software for Win10 is Casper from fssdev. If you know Carbon Copy Cloner, then you'll really appreciate Casper. It will clone to an external HD and then boot from it(!) for restoration to a new internal HD should you decide to upgrade or if the internal HD fails. Fssdev hasn't yet figured out how to write documentation properly (ie, it's for geeks, not Mac users) but, if you're already walking on the Dark Side, you know how it is.
 


You might also like the 2015 MacBook Pro, which still has normal ports (except for Ethernet) and a good keyboard, with decent integrated graphics and faster SSD (AHCI or NVMe, depending on what macOS you're using). That's my workhorse, for what it's worth.
Same here, Ric. Although I recently purchased a 2019 13" MacBook Pro, I always go back to my mid-2015 15" MacBook Pro, to me the last of the great MacBook Pros.
 


I bought a refurb 2015 MacBook Pro last December. Nothing since then has caused me to regret that. I can run Sierra, if I want, and I can avoid APFS for the time being. I have no pressing need for it yet, but I regard it as an (expensive) insurance policy against future disappointments from Apple. I wish it had Ethernet, but I have the dongle, and the absence of the T2 “enhancement” makes up for the absence of an Ethernet port.
 


I bought a refurb 2015 MacBook Pro last December. Nothing since then has caused me to regret that. I can run Sierra, if I want, and I can avoid APFS for the time being. I have no pressing need for it yet, but I regard it as an (expensive) insurance policy against future disappointments from Apple. I wish it had Ethernet, but I have the dongle, and the absence of the T2 “enhancement” makes up for the absence of an Ethernet port.
Same here. I bought a refurb shortly after the first touch bar MacBook Pro was released, which had little of what I wanted and offered nothing new that I needed.

As for missing Ethernet, I have the dongle, but for me, the only time WiFi isn't fast enough is when I'm transferring large files between computers on my local network or starting a new Time Machine backup to the server. In those instances I find it easier to just string a Thunderbolt cable between the computers and transfer the files that way rather than go digging around for the adapter.
 



I have a 13" 2019 MacBook Pro, which I regret buying. There are two reasons:

1) The butterfly keyboard is just plain abysmal.​
2) There is no palm rejection on the vastly enlarged trackpad.​

Between the two of these, the machine is almost impossible to use. (your milage may vary)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
There's a display defect affecting some recent MacBook Pros:
Apple said:
13-inch MacBook Pro Display Backlight Service Program
Apple has determined that a very small percentage of 13-inch MacBook Pro displays may exhibit one or more of the following behaviors:
  • Display backlight continuously or intermittently shows vertical bright areas along the entire bottom of the screen
  • Display backlight stops working completely
Affected devices were sold between October 2016 and February 2018.
#applequality
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I haven't done a full analysis of today's 16-inch MacBook Pro announcement from Apple, but a first glance suggests more competitive pricing for internal flash storage and memory, a major issue in recent years. I also noticed support for 6K external displays... like Apple's upcoming Pro Display XDR. On the downside, it looks like the new laptop will require macOS Catalina....
 


I haven't done a full analysis of today's 16-inch MacBook Pro announcement from Apple, but a first glance suggests more competitive pricing for internal flash storage and memory, a major issue in recent years. I also noticed support for 6K external displays... like Apple's upcoming Pro Display XDR. On the downside, it looks like the new laptop will require macOS Catalina....
Yup. Up to 64GB RAM. 8GB video. Proper keyboard. Physical escape key. Inverted arrow keys. Put all that together with 1TB storage and it's reasonably priced (as Apple's prices go). Colour me impressed with Apple (for the first time in about ~5 years!).
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... Colour me impressed with Apple (for the first time in about ~5 years!).
I'm not going to personally "colour" you impressed until after you've bought one, used it for a number of weeks, and decided you still like it... (Maybe I'm just projecting my own feelings on you! :-)

Knowing how heavily Apple relies on "analytics", seeing how bad Apple's laptop reputation has become, and noting the atypical nature of this announcement, I wonder if a drop in laptop sales might be forcing Apple to rush this new model to market. In any case, I think it might be wise to delay purchase (if possible) to have a better chance for any early defects/bugs to be identified. (Ditto for the Late 2019 Mac Pro.)
 


I am going to hold off giving Apple even a slow-clap for the new MacBook Pro until it has been put through some thorough testing in the real-world. Am still looking for the proverbial snake before taking a bite of this Apple.

One thing I did pick up on was the 100Wh battery, the maximum allowed on airplanes. Also, the 96W USB‑C Power Adapter does not appear much larger, so I am wondering if they switched to a gallium nitride (GaN) type charger, as is common now on the market.
 


I haven't done a full analysis of today's 16-inch MacBook Pro announcement from Apple, but a first glance suggests more competitive pricing for internal flash storage and memory, a major issue in recent years. I also noticed support for 6K external displays... like Apple's upcoming Pro Display XDR. On the downside, it looks like the new laptop will require macOS Catalina....
My view also. Everything looks good about it, except the Catalina thing. I will eventually move up to Catalina, but not yet - and I have been a first-day adaptor of every Apple OS since the first version of OSX, which was buggier than hell. I just need them to work out some of the glitches here. I wish this thing had the option to run Mojave, but maybe I need to start experimenting with Catalina on some test hog.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I am going to hold off giving Apple even a slow-clap for the new MacBook Pro until it has been put through some thorough testing in the real-world....
While only a brief hands-on (in keeping with Apple's typical marketing methods), Jason Snell at least has a quick check on the new laptop:
SixColors said:
Key upgrade: A first look at the 16-inch MacBook Pro
... With the 16-inch MacBook Pro, Apple has revealed its priorities for the MacBook Pro. The new keyboard was almost a given, but a larger display with smaller bezels, an emphasis on performance and battery over size and weight, and a redesigned cooling system to provide more thermal room for processor- and graphics-intensive operations. It seems to me that this MacBook Pro is finally fulfilling the promise made by Apple executives in 2017 to take the needs of its professional users more seriously.

If you’re someone who was waiting to throw out the industrial design of the MacBook Pro for something that looks different, or to add back MagSafe and a card slot, this laptop will disappoint you. Apple apparently didn’t have those features high on its priority list, if they were even there at all.

Only time will be able to tell us how well these laptops work over the long term, how people respond to the new keyboard, how well the thermal system works, and the rest. But right now I’m choosing to be optimistic. I just wrote 2,000 words about a new Apple laptop on that laptop’s keyboard, and it went just fine. That’s reason enough to party like it’s 2015.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I missed this on my first glance!
Ars Technica said:
Apple introduces a redesigned, thicker MacBook Pro
... Dimensions are 0.64 x 14.09 x 9.68 inches—up marginally across the board from its predecessor's 0.61 by 13.75 by 9.48 inches. It weighs 4.3 pounds, compared to 4.02 for the prior model.
Other notes from that page (with a review pending):
Ars Technica said:
As we've reviewed top-spec MacBook Pros over the past year, we've run into some thermal throttling for sustained loads on the top specs, so testing this model will be interesting; Apple says it has significantly overhauled its thermal architecture. Improved fan design affords a 28% improvement in airflow, Apple claims. Between that and a heatsink with 35% more surface area, the new MacBook Pro can manage up to 12 watts of power more than we saw before. Fan noise should be comparable to that of the 15-inch model.
...
Ars is testing a unit now and will publish a review in a few days.
 


I missed this on my first glance!
More than the thickness of a human hair, but less than anyone without a micrometer is going to really notice. They did much the same with the new iPhone 11 models in making them fractionally thicker for the larger battery. What will be perhaps more noticeable will be the extra weight that larger battery entails.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's Apple's trade-in offer for a 2018 MacBook Pro 13" (in perfect condition) with 2.7GHz quad-core i7, 1TB SSD and 16GB RAM: $1090... which is about $1609 for a single year of light use on Apple's plan... (I wish I could make profits like that).

(I wonder what else I could buy outright with $1609, if I hadn't wasted that cash on Apple taxes for macOS?)
 


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