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My advice: be careful. Last year I replaced the battery in my old MacBook Pro, and it took three attempts to get a battery whose actual mAh capacity matched the advertised rating. The first two batteries both held less than the used Apple battery I was replacing! Fortunately, both vendors accepted a return without (much) hassle.
The one I finally kept was this one. Note that I can't guarantee that this battery fits your specific model of MacBook Pro. Please check the specs before ordering.
I just got a replacement out-of-warranty MacBook Pro battery installed by Apple in two days for $129. Prices go up depending on the model, as specified here:
Apple said:
But I have to say this is a no-brainer for me, if you can get that quick turnaround and deal with being away from your device for a bit - a rare case of Apple charging reasonable prices in my opinion.

Last year i did several replacements myself without incident. Even though they were highly rated names you trust, 2 of 3 of them swelled and failed within a year.
 


I need a new battery for my Early-2013 MacBook Pro Retina 15" (MacBookPro10,1 A1398).
I should have added that I never run this MacBook on battery. The only reason I want a battery is that the new smaller MagSafe connector can be dislodged from its socket far too easily, and without a battery, the Mac shuts down instantly.

I only use this MacBook at a client location once or twice a month to run Apple Remote Desktop and Microsoft Remote Desktop, so I can update Macs and PCs. I'll be shutting down the MacBook and removing the power adapter during the time it's not in use. With light usage, perhaps I can get by with a cheap battery.

I wonder if time is a major factor for lightly used cheap batteries swelling.
 


Earlier this month I ordered a 2019 MacBook Pro 16", very well spec'd. It arrived 5 days ago. Once configured, I plugged it into my external LG 5K display. All seemed well at first, but then as I used it and installed more software, it frequently (not always) changed the Brightness slider in the Display preference pane to 100%! My eyeballs were shocked :) This would happen with either the built-in display, the external LG 5K, or both at the same time.
I have a MacBook Pro 16” with a Thunderbolt LG 34wk95 under Catalina. No issues with display brightness. However, the MacBook Pro 16” will crash after a long sleep, if I do not close the MacBook before sleep. If I let the MacBook sleep for over 30 minutes, I will need to restart to wake it up. Same thing happens when connected with a Thunderbolt dock and a Thunderbolt Display.

Catalina is very buggy with Thunderbolt.
 


.... If I let the MacBook sleep for over 30 minutes, I will need to restart to wake it up. Same thing happens when connected with a Thunderbolt dock and a Thunderbolt Display.
Catalina is very buggy with Thunderbolt.
As part of moving to a new driver model for the kernel, Apple redid the USB drivers for 10.15 (Catalina). There is a decent chance it is a USB sleep/wake/'bus controller hot-plug' issue with immature code/stability, and Thunderbolt isn't really a root cause.
 


I have a MacBook Pro 10,1 (Retina mid-2012) running macOS 10.15.3, and occasionally the keyboard fails – I see the bluetooth icon is crossed out, and the only remedy is to reboot. I can log into the MacBook Pro, and it seems to be running. (I believe it also happened in macOS 10.14.) Any ideas?
 


I have a MacBook Pro 10,1 (Retina mid-2012) running macOS 10.15.3, and occasionally the keyboard fails – I see the bluetooth icon is crossed out, and the only remedy is to reboot. I can log into the MacBook Pro, and it seems to be running. (I believe it also happened in macOS 10.14.) Any ideas?
It may not be exactly the same thing, but a similar thing would happen occasionally while booting my old mid 2010 13" MacBook Pro 7,1. Booting would take a little longer than usual, and, since I had it set to boot in verbose mode, I could see that it wasn't recognizing the built-in keyboard and was trying to detect a (non-existent) bluetooth keyboard. Eventually it would time-out and the boot processes would complete. If I closed the cover to put it to sleep, all would be fine upon waking.

The problem disappeared after I replaced the battery. I suspect the old battery may have been expanding and causing intermittent problems with a keyboard connection somewhere. It might be worth opening up the case and making sure all of the keyboard connections are in order and that the battery is not expanding.
 


It may not be exactly the same thing, but a similar thing would happen occasionally while booting my old mid 2010 13" MacBook Pro 7,1. Booting would take a little longer than usual, and, since I had it set to boot in verbose mode, I could see that it wasn't recognizing the built-in keyboard and was trying to detect a (non-existent) bluetooth keyboard. Eventually it would time-out and the boot processes would complete. If I closed the cover to put it to sleep, all would be fine upon waking.

The problem disappeared after I replaced the battery. I suspect the old battery may have been expanding and causing intermittent problems with a keyboard connection somewhere. It might be worth opening up the case and making sure all of the keyboard connections are in order and that the battery is not expanding.
Quite often the trackpad cable is failing. It is the interconnection from keyboard-trackpad-logicboard.
 


As part of moving to a new driver model for the kernel, Apple redid the USB drivers for 10.15 (Catalina). There is a decent chance it is a USB sleep/wake/'bus controller hot-plug' issue with immature code/stability, and Thunderbolt isn't really a root cause.
Looks like the latest Catalina update has reduced the problem. My problem occurred with Thunderbolt devices when there were no USB devices connected to the Mac.
 


Ever since i bought a new 16" Macbook Pro a few months ago, my new Macbook Pro doesn't seem to want to remember wifi networks. Most of the time. When I get home from work (where i connect with ethernet) my wifi list is unpopulated. I have to manually enter my network name and password to use my home wifi. It will usually remember it that evening, but if I close my Macbook Pro and then reopen it, it's about 50:50 if it remembers it.

Went on vacation last week, and the same thing happened with the hotel wifi, so it isn't just limited to home.

Ideas?
 


Ever since i bought a new 16" Macbook Pro a few months ago, my new Macbook Pro doesn't seem to want to remember wifi networks. Most of the time. When I get home from work (where i connect with ethernet) my wifi list is unpopulated. I have to manually enter my network name and password to use my home wifi. It will usually remember it that evening, but if I close my Macbook Pro and then reopen it, it's about 50:50 if it remembers it.
I had a similar issue when I migrated from to a newer MacBook. I had to erase the current Wi-Fi entires and set them up again. I have not had the issue on my new 16" MacBook Pro.

My big issue with this 16" MacBook Pro and Catalina (10.15.3) is the crashes while sleeping for a few hours, if I forget to disconnect any Thunderbolt dock with drives (even if the drives have been unmounted) or any Thunderbolt 3 monitor or Apple Thunderbolt 2 monitor. This problem also occurs on a 2016 MacBook Pro 15".
 


... Ideas?
Unless there is a way to just reinstall the network portion of the OS, I'd lean towards making a couple of clean copies of your SSD (e.g. with Carbon Copy Cloner).

Then wipe the computer (Thunderbolt Target Disk mode) and reinstall macOS from scratch. If the problem persists with a clean macOS, it's time to take the machine to the Apple technician. Benefit: It's already wiped, you already have your backups in place, etc.

If the problem goes away, then I'd reinstall all your apps and see if it still works. If so, migrate the user content back. Otherwise, figure out which app is causing the conflict?
 


Ever since i bought a new 16" Macbook Pro a few months ago, my new Macbook Pro doesn't seem to want to remember wifi networks. Most of the time. When I get home from work (where i connect with ethernet) my wifi list is unpopulated. I have to manually enter my network name and password to use my home wifi. It will usually remember it that evening, but if I close my Macbook Pro and then reopen it, it's about 50:50 if it remembers it.
Went on vacation last week, and the same thing happened with the hotel wifi, so it isn't just limited to home.
Ideas?
Have you looked in Network Preferences > Advanced... > WiFi to see if "Remember networks this computer has joined" is checked? It is in this pane that wireless networks you have connected to in the past will be listed if you have that option selected.

I believe the settings are saved in
/Library/Preferences/System Configuration/com.apple.airport.preferences.plist. At least, that is where I see the historical networks I have previously connected to.
 


Ever since i bought a new 16" Macbook Pro a few months ago, my new Macbook Pro doesn't seem to want to remember wifi networks. Most of the time. When I get home from work (where i connect with ethernet) my wifi list is unpopulated. I have to manually enter my network name and password to use my home wifi. It will usually remember it that evening, but if I close my Macbook Pro and then reopen it, it's about 50:50 if it remembers it.
Went on vacation last week, and the same thing happened with the hotel wifi, so it isn't just limited to home.
Ideas?
Three possibilities spring to mind:

1. If you "migrated" your software/data from an older Mac, it's possible the network settings are corrupted - try nuking the network preferences (check under "I'm having problems with networking/(slow) Wi-Fi/accessing the internet. What can I do?" in my MacStrategy article for the steps.

2. Check your Keychain:
I think you can run a Keychain health verification check from the Keychain Access app. You can also delete entries and re-add them.

3. If you're using Keychain synchronisation via iCloud, this could be causing problems. Temporarily turn it off on your Mac (System Preferences > iCloud). Now try again. If it's still a problem, nuke the preferences/delete the Keychain entries and try adding them manually
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here's a teardown of the new MacBook Air (which replaces the bad butterfly keyboard with a new one):
iFixit said:
There’s Something New in the (MacBook) Air
The MacBook Air 2020 earns a 4 out of 10 on our repairability scale (10 is highest).
+ Re-routed trackpad cables mean that trackpad and battery replacements are available from the get-go and easier than ever.​
+ Many other components (fan, speakers, ports, etc) are modular and easy to access.​
+/– Apart from the pesky pentalobe screws, the MacBook Air opens about as easily as any​
The keyboard, though more reliable, is still integrated into the top case, requiring a full teardown for service.​
Soldered SSD and RAM are a real bummer in a laptop at this price point.​
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Display defects with the MacBook Air:
MacRumors said:
Apple Says MacBook Air With Retina Display Can Exhibit Anti-Reflective Coating Issues, Unclear if Eligible for Free Repairs [Updated]

Apple this week acknowledged that MacBook Air models with Retina displays can exhibit anti-reflective coating issues, as indicated in a memo shared with Apple Authorized Service Providers and obtained by MacRumors.

"Retina displays on some MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro computers can exhibit anti-reflective (AR) coating issues," the memo states.

Apple's internal service documentation for this issue previously only mentioned MacBook Pro and discontinued 12-inch MacBook models with Retina displays, but the MacBook Air is now mentioned in at least two places. Apple added a Retina display to the MacBook Air in October 2018 and all models of the notebook have featured one since.

#applequality
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The new MacBook Air reviewed:
Ars Technica said:
MacBook Air 2020 review: The most boring Mac is among the best

The Good
  • It's the perfect size and shape for most people, and it feels sturdy and easy to grip when carrying
  • The keyboard will prove a lot less divisive—and likely much more reliable
  • Outstanding software; macOS is as stable and nice to use as ever
  • The price has dropped to something easier to manage for more people
  • It nails most of the basics
The Bad
  • It runs loud and hot when you do something demanding for a long stretch of time
  • The camera isn't up to standards in a time of telecommuting
  • Performance is just decent for this price
  • No Wi-Fi 6
The Ugly
  • Two ports is not enough when one of them is needed for power, and the placement of both on one side will not work well for everyone
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This is a weird new Mac problem - recent MacBook Pros overheating and overloading the CPU if you charge from the left side of the laptop instead of the right side...
DigitalTrends said:
Why You Shouldn't Charge Your MacBook Pro On the Left Side | Digital Trends
The issue seems to affect USB-C MacBook Pro models, meaning any high-end Apple laptop from 2016 onward. When charging the laptop using one of the left-hand USB-C ports, the laptop gets unusually hot and the fans start spinning to counteract the increased heat. Given that one of the selling points of Apple laptops is near-silent operation, that is less than ideal.

That’s not all. One user on the programming community Stack Exchange had struggled to work out why the kernel_task process was using so many resources on their computer — including causing their machine to wake from idle a whopping 990 times. The resource-hogging process made things so bad that their MacBook Pro became “effectively unusable” at times.
Apple said:
If kernel_task is using a large percentage of your Mac CPU
Activity Monitor might show that a system process named kernel_task is using a large percentage of your CPU, and during this time you might notice more fan activity. One of the functions of kernel_task is to help manage CPU temperature...

#overheating #kernel_task #activitymonitor #charging #USB-C #Thunderbolt
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This is a weird new Mac problem - recent MacBook Pros overheating and overloading the CPU if you charge from the left side of the laptop instead of the right side...
Here's more about the very odd, left-sided MacBook Pro charging/overheating/overload problem:
OWC/Rocket Yard blog said:
Power Your MacBook Pro From The Right Side USB-C Ports: Here’s Why
On StackExchange and other sites, MacBook Pro users documented situations where charging using the left side USB-C ports caused unusually high CPU usage. The result? The machine would slow down while the fans on the device went into high gear.

The cause of this sudden quirk? Adam, a user on StackExchange, came up with a way to test what was happening and fully documented his results.

He discovered that if you’re charging your MacBook Pro using the left-hand ports and have other accessories plugged into that side, the computer heats up so much that a sensor — Thunderbolt Left Proximity — is alerted and a macOS process named kernel_task appears. Suddenly the fans spin up on the MacBook Pro and CPU usage is maxed out.

#overheating #kernel_task #activitymonitor #charging #USB-C #Thunderbolt
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Apple's message: We apologise for the inconvenience. I think... I feel good about it.
Maybe more like "We weren't selling so many laptops with our widely reviled, defective keyboard design and finally got around to fixing it after four years to restart competition vs. better Windows laptops..."
 


Maybe more like "We weren't selling so many laptops with our widely reviled, defective keyboard design and finally got around to fixing it after four years to restart competition vs. better Windows laptops..."
Jokes aside, it would have been nice if Apple would have included Wi-Fi 6 support and an upgraded front-facing camera for use in this age of increased video conferencing.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Jokes aside, it would have been nice if Apple would have included Wi-Fi 6 support and an upgraded front-facing camera for use in this age of increased video conferencing.
It supports Apple's exhorbitant XDR 6K display, though — well, the high-end version, that is, not the stale two-holer.
 


For those who might be interested, I wrote up an article on my blog comparing the 2020 MacBook Air to the new 13" MacBook Pro, including a per-feature comparison of several configurations and my personal recommendations.


I just wish I could get some information about the 10th gen CPUs used in the new Pros. I couldn't find them on Intel's web site, so they probably haven't been officially announced yet. I assume I'll be able to get that information after the computers start shipping, much like we did for the Mac Pros.

The most interesting conclusion I came to is that the base 13" Pro seems to be a really great alternative to the high-end stock MacBook Air. For the same $1300, you're getting a brighter screen, a faster CPU (despite being an older generation) and a touch bar (only a benefit if you like it, of course). While it has significant disadvantages compared to its more advanced brethren (the 4-port models), it looks really great when compared to the identically-priced Air and may actually compete against it.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For those who might be interested, I wrote up an article on my blog comparing the 2020 MacBook Air to the new 13" MacBook Pro, including a per-feature comparison of several configurations and my personal recommendations.
Thanks for doing that! A few thoughts:
  • Surprisingly, the MacBook Air has more powerful graphics than the 2-port MacBook Pro (i.e. it can drive a 6K Pro Display XDR).
  • I don't think base clock speeds are very helpful as performance measures when there are so many other variables, dynamic speed changes, etc. I'd like to see more performance data (e.g. Geekbench or other comparisons).
  • For me, the limitation of two ports is a radical disadvantage – especially considering that one is required for power, leaving you with just one until you start adding awkward docks and things, and making it difficult to attach two displays.
  • For similar reasons, I find larger internal storage a major advantage - who wants to hang things off a laptop, if you can avoid it? Plus, internal storage is often much faster. (Thunderbolt 3 portable SSDs are very expensive and larger than USB 3 devices.)
  • I haven't seen storage benchmarks, but they could differ quite a bit among these three laptop models (and also from one capacity to another).
  • The macOS Catalina requirement is a huge disadvantage to me, and a major reason I won't consider buying one of these. (Others with simpler configurations and little system legacy may fare better.)
  • The inability to run Linux is another major issue (presuming that nothing has improved since I last tried to do it on the 2018 MacBook Pro).
And, while not relevant to your comparison, I find 13" and 14" screens too limiting in size, personally, and I was kind of wondering how your Dell XPS 15 was doing.... :-)
 


I don't think based clock speeds are very helpful as performance measures when there are so many other variables, dynamic speed changes, etc. I'd like to see more performance data (e.g. Geekbench or other comparisons).
Absolutely. Which is why my comparison of the two $1300 models includes a CPU benchmark comparison. Unfortunately, we don't know what chips are used in the 4-port Pros so I can't (yet) compare them.

PassMark said:
Intel Core i5-1030NG7 @ 1.10GHz vs Intel Core i5-8257U @ 1.40GHz
10th gen Core i5-1030NG7 @ 1.10 GHz (high-end Air)8th gen Core i5-8257U @ 1.40 GHz (low-end Pro)
Clock / Turbo1.1 / 3.5 GHz1.4 / 3.9 GHz
Cores / threads4 / 84 / 8
Power (TDP)10 W15 W
CPU Mark5,7548,246
Single-thread rating1,7792,341
Cross-platform rating10,76516,633
 



For perspective (for what it's worth), here's a comparison of a 2-port MacBook Pro 13" vs. a $650 Dell Inspiron 14" 2-in-1:
Also for what it's worth, while the new 13" MacBook Pro is a pound lighter and is a bit sleeker than the Inspiron 5491, the Inspiron has lots of ports and nearly every component (RAM, SSD, battery, etc.) is user serviceable/upgradeable (manuals).

Actually, the Inspiron 5491's size, weight, and upgradeability is very similar to what I consider to be Apple's last truly great laptop, the 13" mid-2012 MacBook Pro.
 



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