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macOS 10.14 Mojave

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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Apple has an overview for developers of macOS 10.14 Mojave changes, including deprecations:
Apple said:
What's new in macOS

macOS 10.14
This article summarizes the key developer-related features introduced in macOS 10.14 and highlights the developer documentation that describes new features in more detail.
  • Dark Mode
    With macOS 10.14, users can now switch to Dark Mode to transform macOS to a darkened color scheme, putting the focus on your work while controls recede into the background.
  • Create ML
    Create ML is a new technology for creating and training custom machine learning models on your Mac.
  • Mac App Store
    The redesigned Mac App Store includes a new Ratings and Reviews API for Mac apps built using the macOS 10.14 SDK.
  • Notarized Apps
    You can submit your apps to Apple to be notarized before distribution. When users on macOS Mojave first open a notarized app, they’ll see a more streamlined Gatekeeper dialog and have confidence that the app is not known malware.
  • Network Framework
    The new Network framework makes it easier to create network connections to send and receive data using transport and security protocols.
  • Natural Language
    The Natural Language framework is a new framework you use to analyze natural language text and deduce its language-specific metadata.
  • Deprecations and Removed APIs
    Apps built using OpenGL and OpenCL will continue to run in macOS 10.14, but these legacy technologies are deprecated in macOS 10.14. Games and graphics-intensive apps that use OpenGL should now adopt Metal. Similarly, apps that use OpenCL for computational tasks should now adopt Metal and Metal Performance Shaders.
 




So is Mojave the OS where 32-bit apps will not work properly?
Yes, 32-bit apps have their problems with Mojave - for instance, Quicken 2007 (Lion) has some minor problems at this point in the beta test but is still useable with workarounds. Microsoft Office 2011 has a few more problems and can be difficult to use, so it's Pages and Numbers for me. Third-party office apps like OpenOffice and LibreOffice appear to work ok at this time.
 


Does anyone know if the conversion to APFS can still be disabled? When I installed 10.13 on my test machine, I used the command line option to disable it, and for the most part everything seems to be working ok. I'm hoping the option still exists in 10.14.

If not, I guess there is always the backup -> reformat -> restore option.
 


Does anyone know if the conversion to APFS can still be disabled? When I installed 10.13 on my test machine, I used the command line option to disable it, and for the most part everything seems to be working ok. I'm hoping the option still exists in 10.14. If not, I guess there is always the backup -> reformat -> restore option.
There is an app <https://www.paragon-software.com/home/apfs-hfs-converter/> that will convert APFS to HFS+. Have not tried it.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
There is an app <https://www.paragon-software.com/home/apfs-hfs-converter/> that will convert APFS to HFS+. Have not tried it.
I posted a note about that app in MacInTouch news, but I think it would be better to do the conversion manually: Get an empty drive, format it as HFS+, then clone your main drive to it (e.g. with Carbon Copy Cloner). Test that it boots and works OK, then (if necessary), reformat the original drive to HFS+ and clone back to that.

(I don't know, however, if Mojave supports booting from a non-APFS drive.)
 


I posted a note about that app in MacInTouch news, but I think it would be better to do the conversion manually: Get an empty drive, format it as HFS+, then clone your main drive to it (e.g. with Carbon Copy Cloner). Test that it boots and works OK, then (if necessary), reformat the original drive to HFS+ and clone back to that.
(I don't know, however, if Mojave supports booting from a non-APFS drive.)
Just as a FYI, I routinely clone with Carbon Copy Cloner. And virtually all freshly-cloned-to destination drives will not be "perfect" upon first boot. What I have noticed is that random items on the Dock will point to the wrong apps (like I click to launch Photos but Excel ends up launching.) Completely baffling why a clone would do this (the source drive's Dock functions as expected prior to cloning.) But I always run a complete and thorough Onyx.app routine on the freshly-cloned destination drives and then all Dock items resume their proper linking and launching.
 


I have a regular hard drive in my Mac Pro 5,1. I'm just using it as a test bed for Mojave. Before Mojave, the hard drive was running High Sierra formatted as Mac OS Extended (Journaled). When I install Mojave on it, the hard drive remained as Mac OS Extended (Journaled).

Yes, I do have a GPU that is supported by Metal. I had to use dosdude1's installer/patcher for the install. So far, the Mojave installer doesn't like my Mac. One can find it here: http://dosdude1.com/mojave/
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Just as a FYI, I routinely clone with Carbon Copy Cloner. And virtually all freshly-cloned-to destination drives will not be "perfect" upon first boot. What I have noticed is that random items on the Dock will point to the wrong apps....
I was surprised to hear that, so I booted into a CCC clone (macOS 10.12) here to check. The dock items all seemed fine, opening what they should open. The only oddity I found was that Path Finder windows had different display settings (which is not too surprising, as that's a bit of a glitchy area in Path Finder).

I suppose that cloning results in a change to the low-level volume UUID, and maybe some software relies on that inappropriately, but I didn't think cloning should cause any problems or differences.

There are other ways to clone that may be more exact/perfect. Disk Utility "Restore" (or the command-line program dd) should make a perfect copy. SuperDuper may produce different results from Carbon Copy Cloner.

Another factor is whether or not the source disk is mounted/available when you're using the clone, which might create some problems/confusion. (And the presence/absence of Carbon Copy Cloner's optional SafetyNet could affect results.)
 


So how is Mojave? Is it stable enough for a production system, despite the warnings, or is it still “very beta”? What runs, what doesn’t?
 


I was surprised to hear that,
it should be noted that CCC and SuperDuper do NOT make true block (ssector-for-sector) clones of drives. Both copy what the author(s) think need to be copied.* For that reason, I use an external drive duplicator, which can be had for about $40 at Amazon, such as this one:

* See the FAQs #2 and #3 here:
 




So how is Mojave? Is it stable enough for a production system, despite the warnings, or is it still “very beta”? What runs, what doesn’t?
Like all developer releases, it should not be used in a production environment.

It exists so developers can start porting their apps now in order to (hopefully) be ready when it actually ships.

More generally, given Apple's track record of (lack of) quality in 10.x.0 releases, I would absolutely not trust a pre-release build with anything important. If you want to use it, run it on a sacrificial computer - one that you are ready, willing and able to wipe and re-image if/when something bad happens. With your documents stored on an external/network file system.
 


Microsoft Office 2011 has a few more problems and can be difficult to use, so it's Pages and Numbers for me.
Of course, this could simply be because Mojave is pre-release. Office 2011 (and 2016) had serious problems with pre-release copies of High Sierra, as well, but they seem to work OK with the released version.

I don't know what Microsoft is doing with Office to have problems like this, but this isn't the first time.
 


Does anyone know if the conversion to APFS can still be disabled? When I installed 10.13 on my test machine, I used the command line option to disable it, and for the most part everything seems to be working ok. I'm hoping the option still exists in 10.14.
If not, I guess there is always the backup -> reformat -> restore option.
The --converttoapfs option is gone from the Mojave installer. As of yet, I have not seen a way to install Mojave on an HFS+ volume.
 


The --converttoapfs option is gone from the Mojave installer. As of yet, I have not seen a way to install Mojave on an HFS+ volume.
How is this for a quick and dirty way? If you have High Sierra already installed on a regular hard drive, just clone it to the regular hard drive you want to test Mojave on. Then do a normal Mojave installation on the regular test hard drive.

After Mojave boots up for the first time, you can do a normal check to see if the regular hard drive has been converted to APFS. In my Mac Pro 5,1, I have a regular test hard drive and did a normal Mojave installation. The test hard drive remained formatted to HFS+ (Journaled).

Hope this answers your question.
 


So how is Mojave? Is it stable enough for a production system, despite the warnings, or is it still “very beta”? What runs, what doesn’t?
I have been using it on my 2016 15-inch MacBook Pro with a 5K LG/Apple display. So far, it works well without any issues. The standard Carbon Copy Cloner does not work on it and thus you can download a Mojave Carbon Copy Cloner beta version. The white on black is easier to see than the dim black on white. The use of colors in general, is a benefit. For example, in email, the body of the email is blue on black, while the headers are white on black. It seems to be faster. I am using Beta 2 but with a full High Sierra clone ready to go if I give up. With High Sierra, I did not have trouble with the beta versions. I did clone the hard disk before installing the next beta version, so that I could go back one version if the new beta had something that did not work.

With my MacBook Pro and USB-C ports with a SSD in a USB-C enclosure, booting on an external SSD is not really that much slower than booting on the internal SSD. This takes some risk out of using beta versions. In many ways, it seems that the beta versions are merely providing bug fixes faster than waiting for the dot version upgrades.
 


Works, basically, but considerably more glitches than I've seen in the past, in system prefs and iTunes. More like alpha release. But I crave dark mode, so I put up with the rest. Not sure why anyone would put beta software into a production environment.
 


I have Mojave on my 2012 iMac 27". I plugged in a third-party DVD drive (a thin one that looks like the Apple external). I popped a DVD in and it churned a bit and popped out. I discovered that the DVD app is now hidden in the System folder, and is completely new, so I tried running it, but it still won’t load the DVD. Has anyone tried to view a DVD on a genuine Apple external SuperDrive in Mojave?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
FYI on 32-bit support vs. Mojave:
Apple said:
2018 Platforms State of the Union
Last year, we announced that High Sierra was the last MacOS release to fully support 32-bit apps without compromise. And this year, we're announcing that MacOS Mojave is the last release to support 32-bit at all. So as we remove 32-bit support next year, these 32-bit only frameworks will also be removed such as the QuickTime framework and the Apple Java framework.
 


Steermouse 5.3 does not install as an upgrade to the previous version on Mojave. I did install it on another machine (no Mojave) and then installed it on my Mojave MacBook Pro by hand. It seems to work, but I did not have problems with the previous version on my Mojave MacBook Pro.
 


Has anyone tried to view a DVD on a genuine Apple external SuperDrive in Mojave?
Yes! I tried it on a 2017 MacBook with Mojave beta 3, via an Apple USB-A adapter connected to the Apple Superdrive. I inserted a non-region-locked DVD, and DVD Player opened -- it all seems to work fine, except a lot of rainbow cursors when navigating, e.g. fast forward; skip chapter; etc.
 


I tested the Mojave version of Carbon Copy Cloner, v5.1.3-b3, and it worked remarkably well, making a bootable Mojave cloned disk, although I initially had the dreaded ? when I rebooted. (I had swapped one internal iMac SSD for another SSD.) I ran Disk Utility from Recovery Mode, repaired the drive, which did have some errors, then no further issues. Not certain if it's an issue with the beta of CCC, just a random issue swapping SSD's or a Mojave bug. First time I've ever encountered an issue with CCC. I'm rooting thru Console logs to see if I can determine what the problem was.

Almost all previous 3rd-party apps work on Mojave. Some 32-bit ones will launch but quit (WhatRoute and TextEditPlus). When I do run a 32-bit app, I get the warning that it won't be supported in future OS's. Little Snitch runs but takes up a lot of system resources, so I had to uninstall it. Aside from that, the Mojave beta works reasonably well. Definitely not like Mac OS X Kodiak.

As for "wired" keyboards, I have an old relic Apple keyboard (from a retired G4), and when I booted into Mojave, I was prompted to go through some keystrokes in System Prefs > keyboard; however, it works fine to this point.
 


A side note on Mojave betas: If you're on a limited iCloud account, or you aren't interested in backing up these folders: Home folder, Stocks, News, and Siri, by default it will back up them up.

Just a heads up. I was trying to determine why I had so much network throughput in Activity Monitor - turns out it was backing up those files. System Prefs > iCloud. At least that was my experience, as I'm certain I didn't enable them. (Apple, crafty little bas!≤#*. :-)
 


Almost all previous 3rd-party apps work on Mojave. Some 32-bit ones will launch but quit (WhatRoute and TextEditPlus). When I do run a 32-bit app, I get the warning that it won't be supported in future OS's.
The 32-bit version of WhatRoute is not supported past OS X 10.9. A 64-bit version was first released over 2 years ago, and as far as I know, there is really no need to to be running the older release.

That said, I tried the 32-bit WhatRoute on Mojave, fully expecting errors, but it seemed to run just fine, aside from the OS warning when first running it.

If there are features you need that I haven't ported from the 32-bit version could you please contact me offline (email bryan at whatroute.net).
 


The 32-bit version of WhatRoute is not supported past OS X 10.9. A 64-bit version was first released over 2 years ago, and as far as I know, there is really no need to to be running the older release.

That said, I tried the 32-bit WhatRoute on Mojave, fully expecting errors, but it seemed to run just fine, aside from the OS warning when first running it.

If there are features you need that I haven't ported from the 32-bit version could you please contact me offline (email bryan at whatroute.net).
The current version I'm running is 64-bit, v.2.1.5 (11153) - been running that version for quite some time on High Sierra, and it performs without issue. Definitely not a jab at you, just an observation about beta testing Mojave and apps. It launches, opens 2 windows, Trace Route and Bandwith Monitor and quits with no on-screen error. I'm looking at the Console Log, and if you like I will send results to (bryan at whatroute.net). Again, I apologize - I should have contacted you prior to my post.
 


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