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macOS 10.14 Mojave

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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I have an iMac (Retina 5K, 27-inch, Late 2014) with a 3TB Fusion drive that I tried updating to Mojave from High Sierra a few weeks ago. On reboot, the system crawled—just a menu drop down in Finder took more than five seconds. Launching a simple application would take several minutes. I rebooted in Single User mode and it seemed maybe marginally quicker but still so slow as to be unusable.
I booted in Recovery mode and ran Disk Utility twice. No change. I reinstalled Mojave (via Recovery); this also didn't help....
Scott, I had the exact same experience. After an update from High Sierra to macOS 10.14.2, I saw the same excruciating slowness ...
With the release of macOS 10.14.2, I decided to take the plunge and update my 2012 MacBook Pro from High Sierra. After almost a month, I have to admit I've mostly been pleasantly surprised....
I wish I could say the same, Michael, but I'm running macOS 10.14.2 on a fast 2018 MacBook Pro (with a lightning-fast SSD) ... because there's no other option for that laptop, yet I prefer macOS 10.12.6 on a much slower 2015 MacBook Pro. Why?
  • macOS 10.14.2 constantly harasses me to login to iCloud for Messages. I'm not interested, but, incredibly abusively, Apple doesn't let you say "no" or "stop", as far as I can tell. It just keeps harassing you over and over and over. Apple does this elsewhere, as well, constantly harassing to update macOS 10.12, iOS, etc., etc.
  • Really gross startup delays are incredibly obnoxious. This is apparently related to some or all of:
    • APFS issues/bugs
    • T2 issues/bugs
    • incompatibility/bugs with the mainstream Samsung T5
    • FileVault issues/bugs
    • SecureTokens and sysadminctl
    • unknown other issues
  • The stupid system won't even boot from a clone on a Samsung T5. It also won't boot from a FileVault-encrypted HFS volume.
  • There are unresolved bugs in APFS, and I don't know what the details are or how they may manifest, but I'm concerned about possible data corruption (aiming to do more testing).
  • There are quite a few hassles/problems/dysfunction with various utilities I rely on. Some of these can be overcome with special new security settings located in obscure places, but I'm still having trouble with others (e.g. SAT SMART Driver).
  • I just encountered a "Previous System" folder that I decided to delete to save space (since I don't need any "previous system"), but Apple won't let me delete it, throwing up errors about files I can't delete. (I've tried various command-line and GUI tricks to no avail, after rebooting, etc.)
I'm glad Mojave's working for you, and I'd like to move to the newer system, but, disappointingly, it's just not stable or fast enough for me at the moment, even with higher-powered hardware, although I can do work on it, and some of its changes should provide a higher level of security.

But, for me, Apple's increasingly intrusive and abusive customer manipulation is the biggest issue, preventing me from understanding what's happening or controlling my own system, and thus forcing reconsideration of the platform for the future and creating very strong motivation to find an alternative (not likely to be WIndows).
 


A couple more issues with Quicklook... It often gets confused when viewing several photos, displaying them in the wrong order, or suddenly simply quitting, or switching to Preview for a photo. And I think perhaps this: after moving a folder from an SD card and then emptying the trash, it will not allow dismounting of the card (thinking that an app is using an image). Force dismount works with no residual effects. It is really screwed up in Mojave.
 


Regarding my past (Dec. 14/18 posts) efforts to format an external hard disk drive as APFS and make it bootable: I finally gave up and went back to HFS+. But Howard Oakley has a recent blog about using Terminal commands or using a backup app, Get Backup Pro, to set up a bootable clone of an APFS volume:

I haven't tried either and probably won't. In the documentation for making a bootable clone using Get Backup Pro, Belight Software notes: "Pay attention that the drive should be formatted in macOS Extended format and be at least the same size as your system disk". But perhaps this is old documentation; the steps, using Terminal, do indicate using Disk Utility to format the external as APFS. Here is the link to Belight/Get Backup Pro:

If anybody tries any of this, let us know results.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Howard Oakley has a recent blog about using Terminal commands or using a backup app, Get Backup Pro, to set up a bootable clone of an APFS volume...
While I actualy appreciate this information (APFS Bootable Clone With Command Line), it perfectly illustrates the absolute absurdity of where the Mac ecosystem has gone under today's Apple management - this is the very antithesis of the friendly, GUI revolution embodied in the original Mac and an absolutely ridiculous maze of anti-GUI, user-hostile procedures for anyone to have to negotiate to do something so basic.
 


I initially cloned my internal APFS SSD drive, running Mojave, to an external drive, also formatted as APFS. I was able to boot from the external, but only one time. After that I couldn’t even get the drive to mount.

I found this posted on the Bombich site:

"Starting in macOS High Sierra, both APFS and Mac OS Extended (Journaled) are acceptable formats for a backup of macOS 10.13 (and later). Mirroring Apple's recommendations, we recommend that you choose APFS if your destination device is a Flash storage-based device (e.g. an SSD) and will be used to back up 10.13 or higher, or if you are backing up a T2-based Mac and you intend to enable encryption on the backup. Choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled) if your destination device is a spinning-platter-based device (i.e. a hard disk drive, or hard disk drive), or if you are backing up an operating system older than 10.13.”

My external drive is not SSD, so I erased it and reformatted it as recommended. The reformatted cloned drive is bootable, and continues to show up when turned on. I suppose there could be some other reason besides reformatting, but for now it appears that it solved the problem.
 


Since installing Mojave (or perhaps one of the Mojave updates) on my late 2015 iMac, I’ve noticed a peculiar behavior of FaceTime that results in the camera being active but with no FaceTime window being open.

The situation occurs when a session is ended when either party ends the call by clicking the hangup button. The window closes, but FaceTime continues to run with the camera apparently still active—the green light remains on.

Quitting the FaceTime app, turns off the camera. There appears to be no way to reopen the window without quitting the application and restarting it.

In past OS versions, whenever the FaceTime window was closed, FaceTime quit and the camera turned off. I haven’t seen any other reports of this until I recently heard from one other person who noticed the same behavior, so it doesn’t appear to be unique to my system.
 


FYI, the current macOS 10.14.3 Combo updater gives an error that it can't install on this disk. There is a distribution check issue with the combo file (see Mojave thread on Apple support), and someone suggested waiting until Apple fixes the file. (Note: I tried the automatic software update, but it failed to see anything available. I have macOS 10.14.2 on a Mac Mini.)
 


FYI, the current macOS 10.14.3 Combo updater gives an error that it can't install on this disk. There is a distribution check issue with the combo file (see Mojave thread on Apple support), and someone suggested waiting until Apple fixes the file. (Note: I tried the automatic software update, but it failed to see anything available. I have macOS 10.14.2 on a Mac Mini.)
Ed, when did you download this Combo updater? I downloaded my copy late last night (timestamp 10:19 pm, PST) and it worked just fine.
 


FYI, the current macOS 10.14.3 Combo updater gives an error that it can't install on this disk. There is a distribution check issue with the combo file (see Mojave thread on Apple support), and someone suggested waiting until Apple fixes the file. (Note: I tried the automatic software update, but it failed to see anything available. I have macOS 10.14.2 on a Mac Mini.)
The other Ed S. is having the same problem.... One comment at the provided link suggested running the Software Update update, then re-running the combo update. Might give that a try....

...

Update:
That worked.
 


  • macOS 10.14.2 constantly harasses me to login to iCloud for Messages. I'm not interested, but, incredibly abusively, Apple doesn't let you say "no" or "stop", as far as I can tell. It just keeps harassing you over and over and over. Apple does this elsewhere, as well, constantly harassing to update macOS 10.12, iOS, etc., etc.
  • Really gross startup delays are incredibly obnoxious.
I'm glad Mojave's working for you, and I'd like to move to the newer system, but, disappointingly, it's just not stable or fast enough for me at the moment, even with higher-powered hardware, although I can do work on it, and some of its changes should provide a higher level of security.

But, for me, Apple's increasingly intrusive and abusive customer manipulation is the biggest issue, preventing me from understanding what's happening or controlling my own system, and thus forcing reconsideration of the platform for the future and creating very strong motivation to find an alternative (not likely to be WIndows).
I'm sorry to take so long getting back to you. Life gets busy, and I run out of time most days.

In at least the iCloud password case, I think that problem may be unrelated to the OS. My mother's Mini running OS X 10.11 requests iCloud login at least half a dozen times every time you boot the computer (and at random other times as well) and has for a couple of years now. She does not now, nor has she ever, used Messages. We've reset her password multiple times, talked to reps at the "Genius" Bar of the local Apple Store, tried every solution I could find online, and nothing has ever worked. We just don't reboot her computer very often. It's infuriating and ridiculous.

And I completely agree with you that Apple has largely become the antithesis of what they used to be. It's gotten to the point that I just can't recommend any modern computer system to most people. The *nixen are too far out of the mainstream to be really suitable for, say, my 79-year-old mother; Microsoft's OS-as-a-service is disturbing in the extreme (especially the built-in advertisements and dangerously buggy forced system updates); and Apple's lack of quality, utter disdain for the end user, and seeming desire for every device to be a featureless glass slab with no physical controls or function indicators whatsoever make all of them increasingly uninteresting to me. At least Apple haven't (yet) started down Microsoft's "We'll update your computer when we feel like it and no, you don't get a choice in the matter!" path. The constant update popups are annoying, but not nearly as bad as Win10.

As to the disk issues, it may well be the only reason that my setup works (Crucial CT500MX SSD in my 15" 2012 MacBook Pro) is because my machine is so old. The newer machines could well have worse issues, what with Apple's increasing lack of quality control and need to micromanage users' machines nowadays. It's truly depressing to think that perhaps the only reason Apple's most recent OS works decently for me is that I'm not running Apple's most recent hardware. When this computer finally dies, I don't know what I'll do. Probably a Hackintosh of some sort, though I'll miss having a laptop.
 


It's gotten to the point that I just can't recommend any modern computer system to most people.
I know what you mean, and I would include smartphones. There's too much change for the sake of change, just to have new "features" to offer. Once, the new features were things you never knew you needed until somebody thought of them, but these days too many "features" look more like bugs when you first encounter them.

To be fair, it's hard for computer makers to test new OS versions with the whole diverse range of hardware and software used with them, and hard to keep up with the seemingly endless security vulnerabilities. But they really should be doing a lot better. Simplicity of interface used to be a virtue; now it seems closer to an impossibility.
 


Ed, when did you download this Combo updater? I downloaded my copy late last night (timestamp 10:19 pm, PST) and it worked just fine.
There is a long thread here in MacInTouch from folks, like me, who are not able to get the macOS 10.14.3 combo updater to work. I downloaded a 4th copy of the combo updater last night, as you did, and it still does not work for me (retina MacBook Pro, late 2013).
 


It looks like my old iMac (mid-2010) is on its final OS. I'm still running El Capitan and am not sure that I'll ever upgrade to Sierra or High Sierra. Mojave, of course, will not run on this Mac. I hate to buy a new computer just because the one I have is old, like me, especially when it runs fine and has no real issues.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Some details about the latest macOS Mojave update:
Howard Oakley said:
What has changed in the Mojave 10.14.3 update?
The update from macOS Mojave 10.14.2 to 10.14.3 is the smallest of Mojave’s updates so far, but is still substantial by any reckoning: a download of around 2.3 GB, it installs over 4 GB of updated files. Apple’s release notes only detail one change, an improvement to Kerberos authentication which may be of interest to enterprise users.

Security fixes are also few in number, but of those six are in the kernel, according to Apple’s detailed listing.

There are EFI firmware updates only for models with T2 chips (iMac Pro for certain). The standard installer contains a full set of current firmware updaters. I have already updated my list of current firmware versions.

The bulk of the 10.14.3 update consists of replacement apps and software which have new creation dates, unchanged version numbers, and no mention in any release notes. Thus they have changed, but it’s anyone’s guess as to whether anything works differently. For the record, here are the major apps which this update replaces...
 


There is a long thread here in MacInTouch from folks, like me, who are not able to get the macOS 10.14.3 combo updater to work. I downloaded a 4th copy of the combo updater last night, as you did, and it still does not work for me (retina MacBook Pro, late 2013).
David, I think it was in one of your posts where you mentioned getting the Mojave 10.14.3 installer through the App Store. I tried that on my 15" Retina MacBook Pro 11,3 (late 2013 also) and it worked. The file size was over 6 gigabytes. I made a copy of the installer before doing the installation, which went perfectly well.

However, when I transferred the installer file to my 2018 Mac Mini, the installation gave me a verification error and could not proceed. So I tried a fresh download from the App Store onto the Mac Mini, and this time it work without a hitch. Apparently, the download from the App Store links the installer file to the particular Mac acquiring it.

The 10.14.3 update apparently performed a firmware update on the Mini between the 10.14.3 combo update and the update from the full installer. Previously, the Boot ROM version was 220.240.2.0.0 (iBridge: 16.16.3132.5.1,0). Now it’s 220.240.2.0.0 (iBridge: 16.16.3133.0.0,0). Same boot ROM but different iBridge.
 


David, I think it was in one of your posts where you mentioned getting the Mojave 10.14.3 installer through the App Store. I tried that on my 15" Retina MacBook Pro 11,3 (late 2013 also) and it worked. The file size was over 6 gigabytes. I made a copy of the installer before doing the installation, which went perfectly well.
However, when I transferred the installer file to my 2018 Mac Mini, the installation gave me a verification error and could not proceed. So I tried a fresh download from the App Store onto the Mac Mini, and this time it work without a hitch. Apparently, the download from the App Store links the installer file to the particular Mac acquiring it.
That hasn’t always been the case, has it? It would be an unwelcome new wrinkle.

I know installers get associated with Apple IDs. In the past, I have removed my “purchase” info from OS installers. It is stored in
/Applications/Install OS X Mavericks.app/Contents/_MASReceipt/receipt
which you can get to by control-clicking the installer and selecting “Show package contents”. You can remove that receipt file and and the installer will still work.

That’s a Mavericks example, but I have done the same for a couple of other OS versions. I wonder if there is something similar that could be excised from Mojave to make it transferable.
 


That hasn’t always been the case, has it? It would be an unwelcome new wrinkle.
I know installers get associated with Apple IDs. In the past, I have removed my “purchase” info from OS installers. It is stored in
/Applications/Install OS X Mavericks.app/Contents/_MASReceipt/receipt
which you can get to by control-clicking the installer and selecting “Show package contents”. You can remove that receipt file and and the installer will still work.
That’s a Mavericks example, but I have done the same for a couple of other OS versions. I wonder if there is something similar that could be excised from Mojave to make it transferable.
It cannot be the Apple ID, because both Macs were logged in with my Apple ID. It probably has to do with the machine profile. There is no “receipt” file, although a file named CodeResources could be the equivalent. The path is (after moving it):

/Users/Shared/macOS 10.14.3 installer/Install macOS Mojave.app/Contents/_CodeSignature/CodeResources

I will experiment with it when I get the chance. This might be a better way to go, i.e. downloading the full installer from the App Store instead of the combo updater. I know that a couple of wonky behaviors that come on after the combo update were fixed by this installer. Unfortunately, this is not possible if one is running the macOS beta.
 


I downloaded the Mojave 10.14.3 installer from the App Store - I am on High Sierra now. I used the directions found on the web to create a bootable USB drive installer, which worked fine. However I cannot set it as the startup disk, nor does it show up when I reboot and hold down the option key. All I get is my disk and EFI (the recovery partition). I tried formatting the USB drive all different ways, and got the same result. Any words of wisdom to make this work?
 


I downloaded the Mojave 10.14.3 installer from the App Store - I am on High Sierra now. I used the directions found on the web to create a bootable USB drive installer, which worked fine. However I cannot set it as the startup disk, nor does it show up when I reboot and hold down the option key. All I get is my disk and EFI (the recovery partition). I tried formatting the USB drive all different ways, and got the same result. Any words of wisdom to make this work?
I ran into the same issue. My solutions was to format the target drive to APFS (even a spinner), then I was able to run the installer. Note that the USB drive must be formatted in HFS+ so that the target machine can see it during boot (the boot ROM may not see any other format). Also, 9to5 has very good instructions (videos) on how to create bootable installers (using creatinstallmedia and Terminal).
 


I ran into the same issue. My solutions was to format the target drive to APFS (even a spinner), then I was able to run the installer. Note that the USB drive must be formatted in HFS+ so that the target machine can see it during boot (the boot ROM may not see any other format).
There is no option to format the USB drive as APFS.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I downloaded the Mojave 10.14.3 installer from the App Store - I am on High Sierra now. I used the directions found on the web to create a bootable USB drive installer, which worked fine. However I cannot set it as the startup disk, nor does it show up when I reboot and hold down the option key.
There is no option to format the USB drive as APFS.
I'm a little confused. I just formatted a USB drive in both APFS and APFS encrypted formats from both macOS 10.13 and macOS 10.14. What are you trying to do (step by step) and what's failing for you?

I typically use DiskMaker X to create macOS bootable installers, and you might want to give that a try.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
There is no option to format the USB drive as APFS.
Are you referring to a USB thumb drive? That I never tried, but I format hard drives and SSDs on my NewerTech Voyager S3 all the time, as APFS.
I just plugged a cheap USB flash drive into a 2018 MacBook Pro running macOS 10.14.3, formatted it as APFS, copied a file to it, ejected it, connected it to a 2015 MacBook Pro running macOS 10.12.6, and it opened on the desktop, then I copied a file from the APFS flash drive and copied another file back onto it.

There's one issue, though: You must select GUID Partition Map formatting when you erase the flash drive, or else you can't select APFS.
 


I just plugged a cheap USB flash drive into a 2018 MacBook Pro running macOS 10.14.3, formatted it as APFS, copied a file to it, ejected it, connected it to a 2015 MacBook Pro running macOS 10.12.6, and it opened on the desktop, then I copied a file from the APFS flash drive and copied another file back onto it.

There's one issue, though: You must select GUID Partition Map formatting when you erase the flash drive, or else you can't select APFS.
Good to know that it also works on USB flash drives.

Just to make sure that I was not mistaken about formatting USB drives as APFS, I did it again on a 3.5" hard drive on my Voyager. Then I installed Mojave 10.14.3 (from the installer file downloaded from the App Store) onto the hard drive.

I thought it would be excruciatingly slow but was surprised that the fresh installation took only about 20 minutes plus what it took to log into iCloud to complete the setup. Now I have a bootable external Mojave drive running 10.14.3. I can really use one because the internal drive in my Mini is now running 10.14.4 beta, and this could prove to be useful, just in case.
 


I just plugged a cheap USB flash drive into a 2018 MacBook Pro running macOS 10.14.3, formatted it as APFS, copied a file to it, ejected it, connected it to a 2015 MacBook Pro running macOS 10.12.6, and it opened on the desktop, then I copied a file from the APFS flash drive and copied another file back onto it.
There's one issue, though: You must select GUID Partition Map formatting when you erase the flash drive, or else you can't select APFS.
Disk Utility for me does not have an option to format a USB thumb drive as APFS. Only Mac OS Extended (Journaled), that case sensitive, MS-DOS FAT or ExFAT. I am also running macOS 10.14.3. And Partition is greyed out.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Disk Utility for me does not have an option to format a USB thumb drive as APFS.
One has to work through Apple's hide-and-seek user interface games and other user interface dysfunction, but it should be possible to do the same thing with your flash drive as I'm doing on mine, unless you have an unusual and dysfunctional flash drive.
  1. Boot the Mac, connect the flash drive, and open Disk Utility
  2. Choose View > Show All Devices (Command 2)
  3. Choose View > Show Sidebar (Command Option S)
  4. Select the device in the sidebar
  5. Click the Erase button
  6. Choose Scheme: GUID Partition Map
  7. Choose Format: APFS
  8. Click Erase
If these steps don't work for some reason, it may be that you need to either unmount or mount the device or its partitions.

If none of the above works, you should probably try a different device.

Please let us know how this goes.
 


Disk Utility for me does not have an option to format a USB thumb drive as APFS. Only Mac OS Extended (Journaled), that case sensitive, MS-DOS FAT or ExFAT. I am also running macOS 10.14.3. And Partition is greyed out.
Try these steps which work on all available versions of macOS 10.14. Order is significant!
  1. Plug in the USB drive.
  2. Launch Disk Utility.
  3. Under View, select Show Sidebar.
  4. Under View, select Show All Devices.
  5. In the Sidebar, select the USB drive (not an indented entry).
  6. Check that the selected device is described as USB External Physical Disk. If is not, you have not found the correct device. Remedy this before you continue.
  7. Click Erase (right under the words Disk Utility).
  8. Set Scheme: to GUID Partition Map.
  9. Set Format: to APFS.
  10. Set Name: to any suitable string.
  11. Click the Erase button.
  12. When the operation completes, click the Done button.
The probable reason for APFS not being a Format choice is that Disk Utility will not display any APFS choice unless and until GUID Partition Map has been selected. It will not enable the Partition button for a device with Master Boot Record scheme.

This process works for any USB-connected hard drive or SSD - a USB thumb drive is [similar].
 


One has to work through Apple's hide-and-seek user interface games and other user interface dysfunction, but it should be possible to do the same thing with your flash drive as I'm doing on mine, unless you have an unusual and dysfunctional flash drive.
  1. Boot the Mac, connect the flash drive, and open Disk Utility
  2. Choose View > Show All Devices (Command 2)
  3. Choose View > Show Sidebar (Command Option S)
  4. Select the device in the sidebar
  5. Click the Erase button
  6. Choose Scheme: GUID Partition Map
  7. Choose Format: APFS
  8. Click Erase
If these steps don't work for some reason, it may be that you need to either unmount or mount the device or its partitions.

If none of the above works, you should probably try a different device.

Please let us know how this goes.
I tried it on three (older) flash drives and it worked each time. Only once did it fail, but when I ejected the partition and tried again, it worked.
 


Thanks for the replies and thanks (not!) to Apple for making newer versions of software worse than the old. By the way, if you use this technique to format the USB drive as Mac OS Extended (Journaled) with GUID partition map, that also works to make a bootable USB drive.
 


Thanks for the replies and thanks (not!) to Apple for making newer versions of software worse than the old. By the way, if you use this technique to format the USB drive as Mac OS Extended (Journaled) with GUID partition map, that also works to make a bootable USB drive.
A USB drive formatted as APFS by Disk Utility is also bootable.
 


I downloaded the Mojave 10.14.3 installer from the App Store - I am on High Sierra now. I used the directions found on the web to create a bootable USB drive installer, which worked fine. However I cannot set it as the startup disk, nor does it show up when I reboot and hold down the option key. All I get is my disk and EFI (the recovery partition). I tried formatting the USB drive all different ways, and got the same result. Any words of wisdom to make this work?
The root issue here is that practically no USB drives come in GUID partition format. To maximize "sneaker net" data transport compatibility, they typically come with legacy MBR (MS DOS-era) partitioning format.

For a much smaller subset of drives, you'll run into a problem with a security partition (or something along those lines). Again a full disk wipe often gets rid of that problem.

Apple's "boot creator" process may not grab the whole physical disk. You could install "boot installer" into a small partition on your Time Machine drive if you wanted to. That would give you a local bootable drive (presuming you made the Time Machine drive a GUID-formatted one before first setting it up). Or you can erase and repartition a 32GB thumb drive and put a couple of installers on it.

Typically, there is only one data volume/partition on a USB thumb drive, so wiping the volume looks like a drive erase, but sometimes it isn't.
 


The root issue here is that practically no USB drives come in GUID partition format. To maximize "sneaker net" data transport compatibility, they typically come with legacy MBR (MS DOS-era) partitioning format.

For a much smaller subset of drives, you'll run into a problem with a security partition (or something along those lines). Again a full disk wipe often gets rid of that problem.

Apple's "boot creator" process may not grab the whole physical disk. You could install "boot installer" into a small partition on your Time Machine drive if you wanted to. That would give you a local bootable drive (presuming you made the Time Machine drive a GUID-formatted one before first setting it up). Or you can erase and repartition a 32GB thumb drive and put a couple of installers on it.

Typically, there is only one data volume/partition on a USB thumb drive, so wiping the volume looks like a drive erase, but sometimes it isn't.
It is important to view the full sidebar in Disk Utility so that the entire physical device can be changed to GUID scheme for special use with macOS.

Apple's "boot creator", createinstallmedia, writes to whatever volume is specified, regardless of other volumes on the same physical device. I use appropriate versions of createinstallmedia to build several bootable macOS installers to carry along with my software tool kit by using several volumes (partitions) on a 120GB SSD in a USB 3/FireWire 800 G-drive mini enclosure.
 


I found another failure mode on my new Mac Mini (macOS Mojave). When I put a DVD in Apple's external DVD drive, it automatically plays in DVD Player. I have System Preferences set to "Ignore" when a video DVD is inserted, but that setting is ignored. I tried calling Apple this evening and it was a 20-year throwback to Windows. Here is what they had me do:
1. Restart​
2. Boot into Safe Mode. Interesting that the DVD won't mount, even using Disk Utility, when booted into Safe Mode.​
3. Reset nvram​
4. Recovery mode to run First Aid and then reinstall the OS.​

None of this helped. Can someone else try this and tell me if this happens to them? (I boot my computer from an external SSD, but I get the same result booted from the internal SSD.)
 


When I put a DVD in Apple's external DVD drive, it automatically plays in DVD Player(...)Can someone else try this and tell me if this happens to them?
My iMac/High Sierra system doesn't do this; have you tried looking at the Preferences in DVD Player? I'm running version 5500.71 and have the checkbox for "When a disc is inserted" unchecked. I'm not running Mojave, however, so that may be a factor in how my Mac handles DVDs.
 


My iMac/High Sierra system doesn't do this; have you tried looking at the Preferences in DVD Player? I'm running version 5500.71 and have the checkbox for "When a disc is inserted" unchecked. I'm not running Mojave, however, so that may be a factor in how my Mac handles DVDs.
The DVD Player version in Mojave is 6.0. There is no Preferences menu option in this application. We all know Apple keeps removing functionality...
 


My iMac/High Sierra system doesn't do this; have you tried looking at the Preferences in DVD Player? I'm running version 5500.71 and have the checkbox for "When a disc is inserted" unchecked. I'm not running Mojave, however, so that may be a factor in how my Mac handles DVDs.
I ran into this problem yesterday, as a matter of fact. I checked the CDs and DVDs preference pane, and It was set to ignore, as well. What I did was set it to “Open DVD Player”, then closed the pref pane, opened it back up, and changed it back to ignore - and that seemed to work.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Howard Oakley writes about a major change coming in the next macOS Mojave release, though it won't be immediately obvious to end users:
Eclectic Light Co. said:
Apple quietly pre-announces major change in macOS 10.14.4

This isn’t something that users will notice immediately, but is the culmination of nearly a decade of heavy investment and the efforts of many of the finest software engineers: Swift 5.0. Before you abandon reading this thinking it’s relevant to those writing apps, not those using them, please bear with me: this will change your Mac, because it marks the moment that Swift becomes part of macOS.
...
In releasing Swift 5.0 at this stage of the Mojave cycle, Apple is preparing the way for 10.15. Don’t be surprised if that brings further changes built on this important foundation, such as new and re-written frameworks and libraries, on both macOS and iOS. Those could be very important for what’s coming this autumn/fall.
 


The DVD Player version in Mojave is 6.0. There is no Preferences menu option in this application. We all know Apple keeps removing functionality...
I think CCthorp is on the right track with this one. The settings for DVD handling are in your System Preferences in a section called "CDs & DVDs".

If it's already set to 'Ignore', try the following:
1) Pick any option other than Ignore​
2) Close the System Preferences​
3) Reopen the System Preferences and go back to CDs & DVDs​
4) Put it back to Ignore​
It's likely that your previous preference has somehow been damaged, but the above should sort it out.
 


I think CCthorp is on the right track with this one. The settings for DVD handling are in your System Preferences in a section called "CDs & DVDs". If it's already set to 'Ignore', try the following:
1) Pick any option other than Ignore​
2) Close the System Preferences​
3) Reopen the System Preferences and go back to CDs & DVDs​
4) Put it back to Ignore​
It's likely that your previous preference has somehow been damaged, but the above should sort it out.
This is eerily similar to the iOS cellular bug that won't "stick" (except there's no way to properly fix it short of a clean wipe, apparently - evidently Apple developers don't believe much in unit tests).
 


I have a new iMac 5K, to replace a Late 2012 iMac whose screen/graphics card was failing. Mojave has been foisted upon me. I have a hard drive that is a dual TB1/USB 3.0 interface drive. If I connect it with the one TB2 to TB3 adapter I own, it stays spinning. If I connect it via USB 3, it will spin down even though I have gone into Energy Saver in System Preferences and unchecked "Put hard disks to sleep when possible." I have tried checking it, closing System Preferences, and removing the check again, but to no avail. Is there anything I can do, or is this feature fundamentally broken over USB 3?

I also know it's not specific to this system. The drive exhibited the same behavior while attached to my mom's High Sierra iMac while awaiting the new iMac.
 


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