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macOS 10.14 Mojave

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I have a new iMac 5K, to replace a Late 2012 iMac whose screen/graphics card was failing. Mojave has been foisted upon me. I have a hard drive that is a dual TB1/USB 3.0 interface drive. If I connect it with the one TB2 to TB3 adapter I own, it stays spinning. If I connect it via USB 3, it will spin down even though I have gone into Energy Saver in System Preferences and unchecked "Put hard disks to sleep when possible." I have tried checking it, closing System Preferences, and removing the check again, but to no avail. Is there anything I can do, or is this feature fundamentally broken over USB 3?

I also know it's not specific to this system. The drive exhibited the same behavior while attached to my mom's High Sierra iMac while awaiting the new iMac.
There are background programs that keep the hard disk spinning. This one might be useful.
Jon Stovell’s Software

Keep Drive Spinning:
Makes sure that a selected drive does not go to sleep unexpectedly. For use with certain external drives that don’t respect Mac OS X’s power management settings.

Current version: 2.6.2
For Mac OS X 10.4 or later
 


Wow, this is scary. In Mojave, when someone sends me an iMessage that mentions the name of Eminem (never mind why), the Messages app underlines the word "Eminem" to indicate that it's a link to the Wikipedia article about Eminem. How do I turn off this little "feature"?
 


There are background programs that keep the hard disk spinning. This one might be useful.
Thank you, M Fussell. You have single-handedly solved this problem for me. I was surprised to see that Keep Drive Spinning works as far back as Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger. In this day and age, that's impressive. I wish we could say that about more software!
 


Related to my new iMac, the old one ran OS X Yosemite 10.10.5. This one has macOS 10.14.3. Can anyone tell me how I can manually import my mail from Yosemite mail into its Mojave counterpart? I use POP3 exclusively. Everyone in the Apple Support Community seems to have told others that the task is basically impossible, with the sole (recurring) advice being "use Migration Assistant."

That simply was/is not an option for me because the old drive is 3TB, while the new SSD is only 256GB. Its all-or-nothing approach rules it out. My mail will more than fit, but how do I make it happen? Thanks!
 



You might want to take a look at Emailchemy.
Thanks, Ric! I must admit I didn't consider it because I saw it as more of a transfer than a conversion. I've read the manual and emailed their support team because I can't quite visualize the workflow, even though it sounds quite promising. I do wish it were sold on Amazon so that the purchase could support MacInTouch!

I have to wonder: why all the V2/V3 etc. "migrations" for new versions of Mail? if I recall correctly, it's been a very long time since the actual format of stored mail changed in Apple Mail. Is this just a case of "change for the sake of change"?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I have to wonder: why all the V2/V3 etc. "migrations" for new versions of Mail? if I recall correctly, it's been a very long time since the actual format of stored mail changed in Apple Mail. Is this just a case of "change for the sake of change"?
I don't know what exactly changed, but there's quite a variety of files and data structures involved, as you can see in ~/Library/Mail - including "V2" and "V4" subfolders on my Sierra system, a variety of plist files, SQLite data, other files, and mbox files within subfolders with long, cryptic names - all part of the Apple Mail system.
 


I don't know what exactly changed, but there's quite a variety of files and data structures involved [...] a variety of plist files, SQLite data, other files, and mbox files within subfolders with long, cryptic names - all part of the Apple Mail system.
I hope Emailchemy can sort out the problem for me. Apple Mail is what I'm most comfortable with in the absence of Eudora. I've also toyed with the idea of configuring my POP3 accounts, letting it download what's on the server, and then merely drag-copying the old mailboxes into the proper place, dragging the old inbox and sent items folders into freshly created local folders. I haven't done so yet for fear of making an even worse mess.

Or maybe this is a sign that it's time to consider Postbox as my primary mail program. My old system limited me to version 5. Maybe 6 is better? As an early adopter (v 1.1), I do hold a lifetime license.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I hope Emailchemy can sort out the problem for me. Apple Mail is what I'm most comfortable with in the absence of Eudora. ... Or maybe this is a sign that it's time to consider Postbox as my primary mail program.
For what it's worth, I successfully used Emailchemy to migrate from Eudora to Postbox, which is what I use now (not Apple Mail). Thunderbird is a solid alternative, but I prefer the unified In Box and graphics of Postbox (though I still miss Eudora).
 


I don't know what exactly changed, but there's quite a variety of files and data structures involved, as you can see in ~/Library/Mail - including "V2" and "V4" subfolders on my Sierra system, a variety of plist files, SQLite data, other files, and mbox files within subfolders with long, cryptic names - all part of the Apple Mail system.
For Mojave Mail, in the Mail folder in ~/Library, there is a folder labeled "V6." That's what mine is listing.
 


For what it's worth, I successfully used Emailchemy to migrate from Eudora to Postbox, which is what I use now (not Apple Mail). Thunderbird is a solid alternative, but I prefer the unified In Box and graphics of Postbox (though I still miss Eudora).
That's great to hear!

With Postbox 5, I did have an odd problem: after I rebooted, there would be a Recovered Items (or similarly named) folder in the Trash, with copies of all messages sent during the previous session. I'm not sure why this happened, or whether it is a holdover from its Thunderbird roots. Does version 6 still do this?

The only other thing I would dearly miss is the ability to use SpamSieve, thanks to under-the-hood changes that began way back with Thunderbird 3.0. That alone may keep me with Apple Mail.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
With Postbox 5, I did have an odd problem: after I rebooted, there would be a Recovered Items (or similarly named) folder in the Trash, with copies of all messages sent during the previous session.
I haven't seen any problems like that in either Postbox 5 or 6.
The only other thing I would dearly miss is the ability to use SpamSieve, thanks to under-the-hood changes that began way back with Thunderbird 3.0.
That is defintely an issue for Postbox 6 (although Postbox 5 is compatible with SpamSieve). Here's a discussion about the issue in the SpamSieve support forum: Postbox 6.0 Support.
 


Related to my new iMac, the old one ran OS X Yosemite 10.10.5. This one has macOS 10.14.3. Can anyone tell me how I can manually import my mail from Yosemite mail into its Mojave counterpart? I use POP3 exclusively. Everyone in the Apple Support Community seems to have told others that the task is basically impossible, with the sole (recurring) advice being "use Migration Assistant."

That simply was/is not an option for me because the old drive is 3TB, while the new SSD is only 256GB. Its all-or-nothing approach rules it out. My mail will more than fit, but how do I make it happen? Thanks!
Since you say your new machine can't use Migration Assistant, you're obviously going to need to keep a lot of stuff on external drive(s). Now Migration Assistant can let you select what you import, but it insists on your User Library. That's where your Mail is stored, so you should be OK with the 256GB SSD on your new computer.
 


Since upgrading to Mojave, I have been having trouble with the Security & Privacy: Accessibility and Full Disk Access preferences panes. When I reboot the computer, they often come up completely empty, and the utilities I have that rely on these features complain that they need to be added to the list. When I try to do so, the preferences pane goes through the motions of adding the entry, but the list remains blank.

I was able to work around this problem, in a less-than-wonderful way. When examining the contents of the TCC.db sqlite database file that contains these settings, I had noticed that the csreq field contained seemingly random, non-printable characters in many of the rows. Furthermore, I found that if I make a copy of the database file and empty-out the csreq field in all of the entries, replace the original with the copy, then restart tccd, it works--at least until the next time I add a new item to the list or reboot.

Can someone with more knowledge of Mac internals than I have understand what's going on here, and possibly suggest a more permanent solution? I have sent this in a bug report to Apple but, of course, have heard nothing back.

For completeness, here's a copy of the script I wrote to temporarily "fix" the database. Note that this must be run as root with SIP disabled, which is another reason I'd like to find a better fix.
Bash:
#!/bin/sh

if [ $EUID -ne 0 ]; then
  echo "This script must be run as the root user."
  exit
fi

cd /Library/Application\ Support/com.apple.TCC/
cp TCC.db TCC.db.bak
sqlite3 TCC.db.bak "update access set csreq='';"
mv TCC.db.bak TCC.db
killall -9 tccd
 


I've been researching alternative email programs to Apple Mail. I've read about Postbox, Thunderbird, Mailsmith, and a few others.

Postbox looked promising, except I keep reading recommendations to don't use the latest version. Mailsmith is no longer supported. Thunderbird is slow and has the feel of a poorly written 90's port. Some seem to be trying very hard to force users to use IMAP rather than POP.

The big failure that I keep coming across is none of them will easily import my accounts, mailboxes, filter rules, folders, smart folders, etc. from Apple Mail.

So I keep using it, even though it is a steaming pile. How I wish for a macOS version of Eudora!
 


Since upgrading to Mojave, I have been having trouble with the Security & Privacy: Accessibility and Full Disk Access preferences panes. ....
Sounds like some other file than the TCC.db one you mention is the source of the corruption, either in your own preferences or one of the system files, and it probably got corrupted during the update (or, if added as part of it, was created corrupted).

I can't make any suggestions as to what that file might be. When I ran into an issue a few years back after a Safari update that wound up preventing Safari from launching due to some corrupted file, the only fix was to remove everything installed by the Safari package (which was more than just Safari.app/) and then re-apply the update.

So your simplest fix might be to revert to a backup from before the upgrade and then re-apply it. Next would be do a clean install and then migrate your data to the clean install.
 


I've been researching alternative email programs to Apple Mail. I've read about Postbox, Thunderbird, Mailsmith, and a few others. Postbox looked promising, except I keep reading recommendations to don't use the latest version.
I started using Postbox a few months ago - mainly due to Ric's regular mentions of it on MacinTouch. It took several attempts before I finally stuck with it. I'm sure I imported everything over from Mail but probably not rules or smart folders.

One key annoyance: it uses a non-standard canvas for composing emails, which means the Mac's built-in text shortcuts don't work. We use these extensively here and it's a real PIA. I have written to their support - they're aware of the problem but give no indication if it will ever be addressed.
 


Something occurred to me today as I took a screenshot: the resulting file didn't appear on the desktop until after Mojave's new iOS-style preview/editing thumbnail had disappeared. Does this mean that a loss of power while the preview is on the screen could mean that your screenshot (which used to be captured nearly instantaneously) is now gone? That doesn't sound like progress to me.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Something occurred to me today as I took a screenshot: the resulting file didn't appear on the desktop until after Mojave's new iOS-style preview/editing thumbnail had disappeared.
It sure would be nice if Apple offered an option to disable that "feature", but...
 




I want to see what preferences are stored for the DVD/CD System Preferences. I can't find a plist file for this. I suspect the data is stored in the TCC.db file, which Apple doesn't want me to read (or even see). Two questions:
1. Where are the DVD settings stored?​
2. If they are in the SQLite database, how do I read them?​
 


I want to see what preferences are stored for the DVD/CD System Preferences. I can't find a plist file for this. I suspect the data is stored in the TCC.db file, which Apple doesn't want me to read (or even see). Two questions:
1. Where are the DVD settings stored?​
2. If they are in the SQLite database, how do I read them?​
The iDVD preference file, com.apple.idvd.plist, is located in the user's Library/Preferences folder. Any text editor file can open it, or use the free Pref Setter app. (It's old but it works).
 


I want to see what preferences are stored for the DVD/CD System Preferences. I can't find a plist file for this. I suspect the data is stored in the TCC.db file, which Apple doesn't want me to read (or even see). Two questions:
1. Where are the DVD settings stored?​
2. If they are in the SQLite database, how do I read them?​
As far as I can tell, the CDs & DVDs preference pane settings are stored in ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.digihub.plist. I checked this on High Sierra.
 


As far as I can tell, the CDs & DVDs preference pane settings are stored in ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.digihub.plist. I checked this on High Sierra.
In Mojave I don't have the idvd.plist but I do have the digihub.plist file. The internal SSD (came with Mojave installed), which I have done little with and leave unmounted, does not have the digihub.plist file. The external SSD that I use for everything does have this file in my user account, but not the admin account.

When I make a change to the DVD preferences, a temporary file appears, and it disappears when I close the Preferences, leaving the original file with a new time stamp for both creation and modification date. I suspect the plist file is simply replaced by the temporary file.

Doing a cat -v on the file showed this string "com.apple.digihub.dvd.video.appeared". I tried changing the CD preference and this new string "com.apple.digihub.cd.music.appeared" appeared (OK, bad pun) after the original string. To confirm, I changed the picture CD setting and this string was added: "com.apple.digihub.cd.picture.appeared".

A lot of strange characters in the file, so I tried the Pref Setter mentioned by William Fritts. It shows the action for music CD (set to ignore) to be integer 1. It shows the action for video DVD (set to ignore) to be 1, which changes to integer 105 when set to Open DVD Player. This value changes as soon as I make a change in the Preference window, and the new choice sticks without me closing the DVD Preferences window, much less the System Preferences. It didn't do that before, and I don't know what is different now.

Thank you - now I know what/where the file is, and I can read it. This file gets created the first time a setting is changed, or it should. Until then, macOS takes its default action from some other source. I am guessing my original problem was that the file was not created until I closed System Preferences, and once it is created, it works as it should.

I tried my admin account, and now it creates the file and stores my choice without closing the DVD preference, but it didn't so do before. Perhaps closing System Preferences the first time forced the file creation and changed the hidden system default to check the plist file, which then let the admin account create its plist file. This sounds ridiculously convoluted, but it is Apple.
 


I want to see what preferences are stored for the DVD/CD System Preferences.
The preference files should not be accessed directly. They may be binary files, and they are only written to disk occasionally and are thus sometimes out-of-date.

Instead, use the "defaults" command, which displays up-to-date data in a readable form (well, compared to binary, anyway : ). For example:

defaults read ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.digihub

(omit the ".plist").

The "defaults read" command updates the preference file on disk, too, at least in most versions of macOS.
 



The preference files should not be accessed directly. They may be binary files, and they are only written to disk occasionally and are thus sometimes out-of-date.

Instead, use the "defaults" command, which displays up-to-date data in a readable form (well, compared to binary, anyway : ). For example:

defaults read ~/Library/Preferences/com.apple.digihub

(omit the ".plist").
If you have installed Xcode, you can also double-click a .plist file and Xcode will open it in a purpose-built editor window.
 


Another question in the Mojave odyssey prompted by my Yosemite machine's failed graphics card:

I have a full bootable backup, thanks to Carbon Copy Cloner, but I need my Contacts (née Address Book) data. Most procedures mention going into the "old" computer and exporting the data, either in .vcf or .abbu format. However, since the new Mac shipped with Mojave, I can't boot into Yosemite to do that. Am I out of luck despite having a backup? That would be the height of irony.
 


Another question in the Mojave odyssey prompted by my Yosemite machine's failed graphics card:
I have a full bootable backup, thanks to Carbon Copy Cloner, but I need my Contacts (née Address Book) data. Most procedures mention going into the "old" computer and exporting the data, either in .vcf or .abbu format. However, since the new Mac shipped with Mojave, I can't boot into Yosemite to do that. Am I out of luck despite having a backup? That would be the height of irony.
If you had iCloud active for Contacts, you’ll get them downloaded when you do the same on the new system. Contacts are stored [in the backup] in your home directory in Application Support I think.

Migration Assistant should set up new Mac from the Carbon Copy Cloner drive, also.
 


I have a full bootable backup, thanks to Carbon Copy Cloner, but I need my Contacts (née Address Book) data. Most procedures mention going into the "old" computer and exporting the data, either in .vcf or .abbu format. However, since the new Mac shipped with Mojave, I can't boot into Yosemite to do that. Am I out of luck despite having a backup? That would be the height of irony.
I suppose that
a) You didn't use iCloud to share your contacts​
b) You didn't use Time Machine​
In that case, you might try copying the raw data, which it seems is stored in ~/Library/Application Support/AddressBook (your home library). If you copy that from your clone and put it into place on your new disk, and if the permissions are all correct, then I would imagine you'd have your contacts back.

I haven't tried this of course!
 


Another question in the Mojave odyssey prompted by my Yosemite machine's failed graphics card: I have a full bootable backup, thanks to Carbon Copy Cloner, but I need my Contacts (née Address Book) data. Most procedures mention going into the "old" computer and exporting the data, either in .vcf or .abbu format. However, since the new Mac shipped with Mojave, I can't boot into Yosemite to do that. Am I out of luck despite having a backup? That would be the height of irony.
I would think that with a fully bootable backup via Carbon Copy Cloner that you could use the Mojave Migration Assistant pointed to your external backup and migrate over all of your contact information. I believe that one can run Migration Assistant any time after installation of an OS, and one can also limit, somewhat, what the Migration Assistant does. (I am not sure that one can just have Migration Assistant pick your contact information.)
 


Another question in the Mojave odyssey prompted by my Yosemite machine's failed graphics card: I have a full bootable backup, thanks to Carbon Copy Cloner, but I need my Contacts (née Address Book) data. Most procedures mention going into the "old" computer and exporting the data, either in .vcf or .abbu format. However, since the new Mac shipped with Mojave, I can't boot into Yosemite to do that. Am I out of luck despite having a backup? That would be the height of irony.
If none of the previous suggestions work, you could run Yosemite in a VM on the new machine.
 




Here's how to show the standard installer application during a macOS update, instead of the black screen with the progress bar and time remaining. Hold down the command, option, control and shift keys and press W. This enables you to view the log during installation.

You can also access the Utilities menu, allowing access to Disk Utility and Terminal. The "Utilities" menu items are initially dimmed. To enable them, press and hold the command, option and control keys before clicking the Utilities menu. Kudos to scriptingosx.com and this site for creating a short video showing how this works.

 


I notice one cosmetic irritation after installing the macOS 10.14.4 Combo Update on my Mac Pro (Late 2013) 6,1 computer. Every time I do a cold boot, my Apple Thunderbolt Display now stays black for about 8 to 10 seconds after the chime, then suddenly comes to life with the startup progress bar nearly completed. No backlight, no graphics. Obviously, it didn't do that until the update. My monitor used to come to life a second or so after the chime showing the Apple logo, then the startup progress bar.

It's just cosmetic, but it doesn't inspire confidence when the computer and monitor show no signs of life. If I had one of the newer computers with no startup chime, it might as well be a doorstop for the first several seconds.
 





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