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macOS 10.14 Mojave

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A 15” 2014 MacBook Pro Retina (2.5GHz i7, 16GB, 500GB) has me stumped.
It won’t complete a Mojave install, and…
Under Mojave, Wi-Fi becomes so unstable as to render the computer useless.
Make a bootable Memtest DVD or USB stick and run Memtest for at least 3 passes or overnight.

In the past, this was a typical experience with RAM that was unable to perform to the standard required of it by the latest OS upgrade being installed. May be a long shot, but it does not take much time to set the test running and walk away.
 


Today's up-to-date Mojave system is macOS Version 10.14.6 (18G95).
This information is available in About this Mac and also using various tools from The Eclectic Light Company, including LockRattler, SilentKnight, and SystHist. If you want suspenders with your belt, launch LockRattler and click on Install all pending updates or launch SilentKnight and click on the Update button, if it appears.
From About This Mac > System Report, I see build 18G87. Software Update insisted I was up to date.

I didn't have any of those utilities to force an update check (I believe you can also do this via the Terminal), so I quit and relaunched System Preferences, then a Supplemental Update appeared. Applying that took me to 18G95.
 


On my almost-brand-new Mac Mini 3.2 GHz Intel Core i7 with 32 GB of RAM, I was not able to upgrade to macOS 10.14.6 from 10.14.5. The message was always that an error occurred, and I could try again. I downloaded the macOS 10.14.6 combo updater, but that also failed, with an explanation that the software could not be verified.

I zapped PRAM; I tried starting with Safe Boot, and with everything disconnected except my Thunderbolt Display; I tried plugging into ethernet rather than WiFi, but it consistently failed. I could not start the computer in Recovery Mode (the display would go dark after the initial booting) or from an external (Thunderbolt 1) disk (same thing), nor could I connect it via Target Disk to my laptops, because they both have Thunderbolt 2 and wouldn't recognize the Mini. When the display would go dark, it wouldn't turn off, and had faint light in the corners; it was almost as if the computer thought some phantom monitor was the main display, and the Thunderbolt display was secondary.

Finally, I connected the Mini via HDMI to a television as a monitor, put it next to the Eero router, and started up in Internet Recovery mode. I was able to reinstall Mojave, and when it was finished, I had macOS 10.14.6, with the latest security patch.

Today, when I attempted to install this latest Software Update, it failed with the same error, reminding me that I might try again. I am not the only one with this problem, according to the Apple support community.
 


Does anyone else with an iMac (5K, 2017) running with a second screen have a failure to wake from sleep issue with Mojave? It began immediately after I updated the OS, and while clicking my mouse causes the computer to sound like it's waking... both screens remain dark. Only a push-button restart brings it back to life. I tried resetting the SMC and NVRAM to no avail.
I seem to have had a similar problem with my 2012 iMac 27" (Core i7, 3.4Ghz, 24GB RAM). While using Mojave 10.14.5 I started having what I thought were shut down issues but seem now to be sleep/wake issues.

I never used the sleep feature much, because it always gave me improper shut down warnings on my external drives. I started seeing my computer going to sleep - shutting down with no warning but never showing an improper shut down error message upon restarting. The only way to revive it was to unplug it for a minute, plug it back in and then press the power button (resetting the SMC?). It always restarted bet never indicated the shut down was improper.

I then updated to macOS 10.14.6, but the issue continued. I read that the latest update fixed a sleep/wake issue on MacBook Pro but never saw there was an issue with an iMac. The sleep problem persisted to where the machine would sleep after only about 10 minutes and sometimes less, after restart.

I read on MacInTouch yesterday that there was a new Mojave Combo update available, so I installed that one and then saw that I had the latest Build 18G95. The first time I updated to macOS 10.14.6, it left me with 18G87.

My random sleep and unplugging the power cord problems haven't appeared since the Combo update.
 


What about trying an earlier version of the installer, even macOS 10.14.0, then updating to the latest version. I wonder whether the appropriate firmware update(s) happened.
Thanks to Ric, Frank M, & Ken M for your replies.

I visited the troublesome computer yesterday, armed with hope and two "virgin" Mojave boot volumes - the first, 10.14.6 Mojave, built from the macOS 10.14.3 installer and the 10.14.6 Combo Updater posted by Apple on Mon 8/26, and the second, a stock macOS 10.4.3 with no updates applied. iCloud was not configured in either volume.

Unfortunately, the MacBook Pro, when booted from either macOS 10.14.6 or 14.14.3, exhibited the same symptoms as before—unstable Wi-Fi, hanging, etc.

In addition, a check using Silent Knight (thanks, Frank M, for bringing this useful utility to my attention) showed that the firmware was up-to-date.

My next test will be to try installing an early version of Mojave directly onto the computer, but that will have to wait until the owner is able to part with it for an afternoon.

Any further tips, suggestions, or ruminations would be much appreciated.
 




Wow! Another Mojave 10.14.6 supplemental was released. Before the update, the build was 18G87. After the update, the new build is 18G95. I was notified by an update notification in the upper right of the screen. Has anyone else noticed this update today?
 




The latest Mojave installer downloaded from the App Store presumably has all the fixes in, since it is different from the one from earlier. It is version 14.6.04, created 8/20, size 6,050,872,185 bytes. So if you want the latest installer, get that.
 


I stumbled on an apparently easy solution to the Mojave wake-from-sleep issue.

I have a late 2018 Mac Mini, which has had the issue for several months. The most recent macOS updates (current through 10.14.6 Supplemental) subjectively reduced the problem, but it still continued occasionally, at least once a day (particularly when first waking the computer in the morning). The only immediate solution was unplugging the HDMI connection to the monitor, then plugging it back in again.

Finally, in frustration on a hunch, I unchecked two options in Energy Saver Preferences: "Put hard disks to sleep when possible" and "Enable Power Nap." In the 10 days since I did that (I've kept a log), I have not had a single wake from sleep problem. The other three options are still checked (they involve waking; I turned off the two that involved sleeping). FWIW.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
More quality problems with the "final" macOS 10.14 Mojave release...
Eclectic Light Co. said:
Mojave 10.14.6 can still panic MacBook Pro 15-inch 2018 and 2019 models
Some MacBook Pro users may still suffer sporadic kernel panics because of firmware bugs in any release of macOS 10.14.6 Mojave, even after the second Supplemental Update. This appears to be confined to MacBook Pro 15-inch models from 2018 and 2019, designated MacBookPro15,1 and possibly also 15,3.

Careful research by Mr. Macintosh shows that those specific models can continue to suffer kernel panics when their built-in FaceTime camera is used, irrespective of which app uses it. There appear to be only two workarounds at present:
  • Don’t use the built-in FaceTime camera until the problem is fixed.
  • Connect a USB or another web camera, even if it’s left unused.
Apple is understood to be working on a further BridgeOS/iBridge firmware update to fix this, which will no doubt be released in 10.14.6 Supplemental Update take 3 in the near future. I suspect that will make the 10.14.6 the longest Apple has ever taken to get a minor macOS right.
#firmware #bridgeos #t2 #applequality
 


I've had a 100% failure rate burning dual-layer DVDs in Mojave 10.14.6 on both a Late-2012 iMac and an Early-2009 Mac Pro (flashed to 5,1, Metal-capable Radeon RX570).

I use two external USB-powered burners on the iMac — one is from a MacBook Pro, the other is a Blu-ray. In Sierra, both burned successfully. In Mojave, both fail.

After upgrading to Mojave, the iMac has kernel-panicked a few times inside the USB IOKit driver — the burn fails could be related.

The Mac Pro has its original Apple SuperDrive plus a Blu-ray burner. In Mojave, both fail to burn. When booted into El Capitan, all burns are successful.
 


I've had a 100% failure rate burning dual-layer DVDs in Mojave 10.14.6 on both a Late-2012 iMac and an Early-2009 Mac Pro (flashed to 5,1, Metal-capable Radeon RX570).
I use two external USB-powered burners on the iMac — one is from a MacBook Pro, the other is a Blu-ray. In Sierra, both burned successfully. In Mojave, both fail.
After upgrading to Mojave, the iMac has kernel-panicked a few times inside the USB IOKit driver — the burn fails could be related.
The Mac Pro has its original Apple SuperDrive plus a Blu-ray burner. In Mojave, both fail to burn. When booted into El Capitan, all burns are successful.
I won't claim this is the answer, but I had the same issue. I thought my burners were bad. Then I examined my blank CDs and DVDs more closely and realized the burn failures were with older media that had been up on my shelf for a while. When I started using newer media, the problems disappeared.

Yet these old discs worked fine in El Cap (and burn fine with the same burner when used with my Win10 box). I was burning at slower speeds (no more than half the maximum of the media), so this wasn't a user error. As my Macs are now Mojave, I just trashed the older media.

Like you, I'm thinking Apple (accidentally?) changed something in the underlying software all the vendors hook into, and older media with, perhaps, slower burn speeds are no longer compatible with Mojave.
 


I won't claim this is the answer, but I had the same issue. I thought my burners were bad. Then I examined my blank CDs and DVDs more closely and realized the burn failures were with older media that had been up on my shelf for a while. When I started using newer media, the problems disappeared. ...
Thanks for the tip. Although much of my media is older, I was using brand-new dual-layer DVDs. They are a cheap, non-brand name, though. I only need them to create installers that don't fit on my good single-layer DVDs, so I don't care if they don't last.

Mojave won't install in a Mac Pro that has a non-Metal GPU, even when there's also a Metal GPU. But it will boot and appears to work OK with both GPUs. In fact, Mojave will boot with just the original non-Metal GPU. I'll test putting the NVIDIA GeForce GT 120 back in and putting a spinner HD in a sled to run El Capitan to burn media.
 


I've had a 100% failure rate burning dual-layer DVDs in Mojave 10.14.6 on both a Late-2012 iMac and an Early-2009 Mac Pro (flashed to 5,1, Metal-capable Radeon RX570).
I use two external USB-powered burners on the iMac — one is from a MacBook Pro, the other is a Blu-ray. In Sierra, both burned successfully. In Mojave, both fail.
After upgrading to Mojave, the iMac has kernel-panicked a few times inside the USB IOKit driver — the burn fails could be related.
The Mac Pro has its original Apple SuperDrive plus a Blu-ray burner. In Mojave, both fail to burn. When booted into El Capitan, all burns are successful.
Optical burning seems to have been dying a slow death. Somewhere around Sierra, I realized that my video iDVD images could no longer be burned in Disk Utility, and using Finder burning resulted in the images being burned in ISO without mentioning this. Some players/computers didn't care, but most dedicated DVD players were not happy. Now I keep a Mavericks boot partition to make real video DVDs.

You might try another burning app, such as Toast, if you have it.
 


Optical burning seems to have been dying a slow death. Somewhere around Sierra, I realized that my video iDVD images could no longer be burned in Disk Utility, and using Finder burning resulted in the images being burned in ISO without mentioning this. Some players/computers didn't care, but most dedicated DVD players were not happy. Now I keep a Mavericks boot partition to make real video DVDs.
You might try another burning app, such as Toast, if you have it.
Toast also exhibited the same failures in Mojave with older media. Newer discs (CD/DVD/DVD-DL) do seem to work. But I'll re-state that I'm burning at no more than half the speed of the media or burner (whichever is less).
 


I have heard that unburned optical media does have a finite life, but it could also be true that the burning software is now... compromised. I imagine that unburned life varies wildly depending on chemistry and storage conditions. In the long run, it will likely be more difficult to source new high-quality optical media and software/hardware to burn them.

I use Plextools to check on media and burn speed optimization. It's nearly always a little mysterious.
 


... Now I keep a Mavericks boot partition to make real video DVDs. ...
Besides making my Mac Pro dual-boot with El Capitan, I have a 2009 MacBook Pro with the original internal DVD running Snow Leopard and El Capitan. I got a great deal on a clean 2015 Dell laptop with an i7 and Windows 10, I can always use an external burner with it.
 


Toast also exhibited the same failures in Mojave with older media. Newer discs (CD/DVD/DVD-DL) do seem to work. But I'll re-state that I'm burning at no more than half the speed of the media or burner (whichever is less).
After Toast "toasted" two 100GB Blu-ray M-DISC's in a row, I gave up on it. I have had better luck using the built-in Finder burning features.
 


Like you, I'm thinking Apple (accidentally?) changed something in the underlying software all the vendors hook into, and older media with, perhaps, slower burn speeds are no longer compatible with Mojave.
I believe the "change" was that Apple rebuilt the underlying burning software to be 64-bit in Mojave. When I started compiling my macOS 32-Bit Applications Unsupported With macOS 10.15 And Later article (22nd June 2017), all burning software was 32-bit (this was up to High-Sierra).

At the time, I surmised that Apple were just going to dump it, as they might drop support for any Mac with a built-in optical drive with macOS 10.15. As it turns out, macOS 10.15 still supports the Mid 2012 MacBook Pros, which came with a built-in optical drive. macOS 10.14 shipped with 64-bit burning software, and Toast 17 also came out, which was the first version of Toast that was 64-bit.

I guess, somewhere along the line in that change to 64-bit, things are not all that perfect :-(
 


... A few years back, I saw similarly erratic results trying to burn audio CDs for use in my car and DVDs for digital backup. Some burns were complete failures, but other burns worked sometimes, didn't work others, and results often depended on which drive I used to record or play them.

Burning more slowly seemed to help, but now I have largely abandoned optical disks (and with a 2018 Mac Mini as my desktop, I would have to get an external drive or jury-rig burning through the one machine running on my home network that has an internal optical drive).
 


Apple has released 10.14.6 Supplemental Update 2 and Security Update 2019-005 for Sierra and High Sierra. The esteemed Howard Oakley has a post about them:
Eclectic Light Co. said:
10.14.6 Supplemental Update 2, and Security Updates 2019-005
Apple has just released macOS 10.14.6 Supplemental Update 2 (which is in fact the third Supplemental Update to 10.14.6). Around 1.25 GB in size, Apple states that this fixes one security vulnerability in Foundation, which could be attacked remotely. This brings the build number of Mojave to 18G103.

... It’s tempting to suggest that this might also include the ‘final’ fix for kernel panics on MacBook Pro 15-inch 2018 and 2019 models, as described here, although there are no firmware updates for the T2-equipped iMac Pro.
#security #applesecurity
 


Thanks for the tip. Although much of my media is older, I was using brand-new dual-layer DVDs. They are a cheap, non-brand name, though. I only need them to create installers that don't fit on my good single-layer DVDs, so I don't care if they don't last. Mojave won't install in a Mac Pro that has a non-Metal GPU, even when there's also a Metal GPU. But it will boot and appears to work OK with both GPUs. In fact, Mojave will boot with just the original non-Metal GPU. I'll test putting the NVIDIA GeForce GT 120 back in and putting a spinner HD in a sled to run El Capitan to burn media.
Cheap media is useless after a few years – I learned that hard lesson a few years ago. I now use Verbatim CDR, and for DVDR, I looked for high quality and speed.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Apple has released 10.14.6 Supplemental Update 2 and Security Update 2019-005 for Sierra and High Sierra. The esteemed Howard Oakley has a post about them:
Thanks for the early heads-up, and here's more about Apple's frustrating update naming and documentation issues:
Mr. Macintosh said:
macOS updates 9/26/19 – Mojave 10.14.6 #3 – 10.13 & 10.12 (2019-005)
10.14.6 Supplemental Update #3 ??? Wait.. What? Apple is calling it the 2nd Supplemental Update.

Not sure where Apple got out of order here, but this is the 10.14.6 Build Version release schedule.
  • 1. 10.14.6 Mojave First Release (18G84) – 7/22/19
  • 2. 10.14.6 Mojave Supplemental Update #1 (18G87) – 8/05/19
  • 3. 10.14.6 Mojave Supplemental Update #2 (18G95) – 8/26/19
  • 4. 10.14.6 Mojave Supplemental Update #3 (18G103) – 9/26/19
Which version of the 10.14.6 update does my Mac need?
Software Update will always point you to the right update.
  1. Any Build Version of 10.14.6 = Supplemental Update #3
  2. 10.14.0-10.14.4 = Combo Update
  3. 10.14.5 = Delta Update
  4. 10.8 – 10.14.6 Upgrade = Updated 10.14.6 (18G103) Full Installer.app
 


I am new to the Mojave party, but I ran into an issue (with a solution) that might help folks. I could not find this issue in this thread, so apologies if this has been covered previously.

I have a 2010 Mac Pro with three internal drives. I recently upgraded to Mojave successfully. This week I had a macOS supplemental update. I could download and run the installer, but the installer quit with the message "macOS could not be installed on your computer" and "the installer resources were not found".

I found a solution at

Apparently the installer gets confused if you have multiple drives connected. I removed both extra internal drives (have no external drives installed) temporarily and was able to update macOS.
 


I believe the "change" was that Apple rebuilt the underlying burning software to be 64-bit in Mojave. When I started compiling my macOS 32-Bit Applications Unsupported With macOS 10.15 And Later article (22nd June 2017), all burning software was 32-bit (this was up to High-Sierra).
At the time, I surmised that Apple were just going to dump it, as they might drop support for any Mac with a built-in optical drive with macOS 10.15. As it turns out, macOS 10.15 still supports the Mid 2012 MacBook Pros, which came with a built-in optical drive. macOS 10.14 shipped with 64-bit burning software, and Toast 17 also came out, which was the first version of Toast that was 64-bit. I guess, somewhere along the line in that change to 64-bit, things are not all that perfect :-(
That's interesting, Graham. Perhaps that 64-bit re-write explains why Toast 17 is a complete disaster, as judged by the responses posted on Roxio forums.

I am new to the Mojave party, but I ran into an issue (with a solution) that might help folks. I could not find this issue in this thread, so apologies if this has been covered previously. I have a 2010 Mac Pro with three internal drives. I recently upgraded to Mojave successfully. This week I had a macOS supplemental update. I could download and run the installer, but the installer quit with the message "macOS could not be installed on your computer" and "the installer resources were not found".... Apparently the installer gets confused if you have multiple drives connected. I removed both extra internal drives (have no external drives installed) temporarily and was able to update macOS.
Yes, and for the initial install, the disk has to be connected to one of the six SATA ports, as well. There is a lot of good advice and tips in tsialex's wiki post (first entry) in this Macrumors forum thread.
 


I believe the "change" was that Apple rebuilt the underlying burning software to be 64-bit in Mojave. When I started compiling my macOS 32-Bit Applications Unsupported With macOS 10.15 And Later article (22nd June 2017), all burning software was 32-bit (this was up to High-Sierra).
Wouldn't the macOS "underlying burning software" be DiscRecording.framework? On High Sierra, it is 64-bit.

It seems to me that a disc-burning program could be using one of three methods to burn the disc:
  • Call some built-in macOS facility, such as the DiscRecording API mentioned above.
  • Roll their own code. What do you want to bet that's what Toast does?
  • Use an open source burn utility.
Take the Burn app, for example, which has been 64-bit since at least 2012. Burn uses open source programs ffmpeg, lame, vcdimager, dvdauthor, spumux, mkisofs and dvda-author. It isn't clear what it is using to do the burning, but if it is using an open source tool, it could be growisofs, cdrecord, or libburn.

If the burning application is dependent on a third-party burning program, and that program is 32-bit, then that's the reason, not what Apple is doing in macOS.
 


Wouldn't the macOS "underlying burning software" be DiscRecording.framework? On High Sierra, it is 64-bit.
It seems to me that a disc-burning program could be using one of three methods to burn the disc:
  • Call some built-in macOS facility, such as the DiscRecording API mentioned above.
  • Roll their own code. What do you want to bet that's what Toast does?
  • Use an open source burn utility.
Take the Burn app, for example, which has been 64-bit since at least 2012. Burn uses open source programs ffmpeg, lame, vcdimager, dvdauthor, spumux, mkisofs and dvda-author. It isn't clear what it is using to do the burning, but if it is using an open source tool, it could be growisofs, cdrecord, or libburn.
If the burning application is dependent on a third-party burning program, and that program is 32-bit, then that's the reason, not what Apple is doing in macOS.
That's very useful information - thank you. Clearly it isn't the underlying software provided by Apple. I also checked that framework under macOS 10.12, and it's 64-bit there, too.

The third parties are obviously at fault for not quickly updating their applications to be 64-bit (except the Burn developer). This also means, unfortunately, all of this doesn't help Sam Herschbein.
 


Take the Burn app, for example, which has been 64-bit since at least 2012. Burn uses open source programs ffmpeg, lame, vcdimager, dvdauthor, spumux, mkisofs and dvda-author. It isn't clear what it is using to do the burning, but if it is using an open source tool, it could be growisofs, cdrecord, or libburn.
Given this list of open source packages, it seems that they are making a disk image and are then writing the image to the optical media.

That last step (of burning a pre-created image to media) shouldn't fail unless disk burning is completely broken. And even if Apple's frameworks are that broken, there are plenty of well-documented methods (along with open source software like cdrdao) to open the drive and directly issue the SCSI commands needed to make the burn happen.
 


Given this list of open source packages, it seems that they are making a disk image and are then writing the image to the optical media. That last step (of burning a pre-created image to media) shouldn't fail unless disk burning is completely broken. And even if Apple's frameworks are that broken, there are plenty of well-documented methods (along with open source software like cdrdao) to open the drive and directly issue the SCSI commands needed to make the burn happen.
I've been struggling with burning Blu-ray data discs, my backup archive, from Retrospect sparse image files. I used to use Toast, but after half a dozen successful burns, it failed consistently at 100% with a buffer overrun error. I upgraded at the beginning of the year to Toast 17, and again this summer to Toast 18, but always had the same error.

Finally, last week, I began using Apple's Burn to Disk command from the Finder and was successful 4 times!

I know I have to bug Roxio about the error, but haven't had the time. :-(
 



...it's time to snare a copy of Mojave if you have Macs running older versions of macOS that you don't want to run Catalina.
My mom's High Sierra iMac falls into this category. What's the best way to snag the full installer without accidentally initiating an upgrade?
 


My mom's High Sierra iMac falls into this category. What's the best way to snag the full installer without accidentally initiating an upgrade?
I went to the App Store, searched for Mojave, downloaded “it” (it was the 6GB installer), quit the installer when it autostarted, and moved it outside the Applications folder....
 



I went to the App Store, searched for Mojave, downloaded “it” (it was the 6GB installer), quit the installer when it autostarted, and moved it outside the Applications folder....
Is there another way of downloading the Mojave installer? My problem is I'm currently running Mojave, and I tried your way but the Mac App Store initiated the Software Update pane in System Preferences. I had to stop the Software Update mechanism.
 


Is there another way of downloading the Mojave installer? My problem is I'm currently running Mojave, and I tried your way but the Mac App Store initiated the Software Update pane in System Preferences. I had to stop the Software Update mechanism.
I did this just today (I am also running Mojave) and the download is initiated as you describe. The installer launches automatically after downloading. All you have to do is quit the installation process. The installer app will be in the /Applications folder.
 


Is there another way of downloading the Mojave installer? My problem is I'm currently running Mojave, and I tried your way but the Mac App Store initiated the Software Update pane in System Preferences. I had to stop the Software Update mechanism.
Two ways (caveat: here be hackers):

macOS Mojave Patcher Tool
Run the application. Acknowledge any "Natively Supported Machine" dialog. Tools menu > Download macOS Mojave (Command-D). Cancel any prompt to patch your Mac when it's done.

installinstallmacos.py
A Python script "to download the parts for an Install macOS app from Apple's softwareupdate servers and install a functioning Install macOS app onto an empty disk image." Run it in Terminal.

 


Is there another way of downloading the Mojave installer? My problem is I'm currently running Mojave, and I tried your way but the Mac App Store initiated the Software Update pane in System Preferences. I had to stop the Software Update mechanism.
Actually Software Update downloaded the Mojave installer.
 


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