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macOS 10.14 Mojave

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The detailed and comprehensive Ars Technica review of Apple's Mac OS Mojave is out:
This is a super-informative and helpful overview of Mojave, written in language that's mostly understandable to mere mortals. It offers clear and excellent advice about upgrading and (especially) about what to expect in the new OS. Kudos to Ars Technica, and thanks to Scott for posting.
 


Can anybody (hopefully more than one anybody) confirm that Aperture still works with the release version of Mojave??
I have installed Mojave on one computer and done a very basic "does Aperture open and seem to work" test. No issues so far. Please be careful, if it's critical to you.
 


Here's a peculiarity. In High Sierra, I used the option for a dark menu bar, but with Mojave, I'm not sure I like everything being dark at all (and the new AdBlock Safari extension has no visible text in the dropdown menu when in Dark mode).

The thing is, I installed Mojave while the black menu bar was active, as it has been for the last year, and now my menubar icons remain black and white, with only Little Snitch changing automatically, and Malwarebytes having a preference for colour or B&W. iPassword, PIA, AdobeCC, PpChar, XMenu, Cookie and FruitJuice are all stuck in B&W.

So if you had liked the dark menu bar, perhaps try changing it back to normal before installing Mojave.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This article for developers seems to have some interesting content. I've pulled out some excerpts in the quote below, but see the original for the full content.
Apple Developer Docs said:
macOS 10.14 Mojave Release Notes
...
Known Issues ...
Mac Pro (mid 2010 and mid 2012 models) must first be updated to macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 before updating to macOS Mojave. (41798700)

Deprecations
Ink APIs in Ink.framework and associated ink events in Carbon are deprecated. (29008562)

32-bit Deprecation
32-bit processes now trigger an alert on launch....
32-bit system services such as mdworker32, quicklookd32, inkserver, qtkitserver remain for compatibility purposes and will be deprecated in a future release of macOS. If your app is using one of these services, migrate to the equivalent 64-bit framework.

QTKit and QTMovieModernizer depend on the deprecated 32-bit QuickTime framework which remains present in macOS Mojave for compatibility purposes. When future versions of macOS no longer support 32-bit processes, these APIs will become unavailable.

Administrators are encouraged to review root-owned daemons and processes on behalf of non-administrator users, as these users might lack permissions required to resolve previously-installed 32-bit dependencies.

Apple File System (APFS)
After enabling or disabling FileVault on a volume, the volume will become invisible to pre-macOS Mojave systems until the encryption or decryption process completes.

Disk Utility
Important: Don't use Disk Utility while booted from Internet Recovery to erase an APFS Fusion container. (40565698)
Workaround: Use Disk Utility while booted into macOS 10.13.6 or newer.

FaceTime and Messages
Group FaceTime has been removed from the initial release of macOS Mojave and will ship in a future software update later this fall.

Deprecations
Grab is superseded by the Screenshot app.

HomeKit
Inviting iOS 11 users who have multiple email addresses associated with their Apple ID to a home might not succeed. (41033550)
Workaround: Send the invitation to a different email address or phone number associated with the Apple ID of the iOS 11 user.

Localization
You might experience difficulty logging into your account because the keyboard layout may change unexpectedly at the Login window. (40821875)
Workaround: Log in to your account, launch Terminal, and execute the following command:
sudo rm -rf /var/db/securityagent/Library/Preferences/com.apple.HIToolbox.plist

Mail
The Stationery feature has been removed. (38725777)

Networking

New Features
The URLSession HTTP/2 implementation is updated to support HTTP/2 connection reuse per RFC 7540 Section 9.1.1. This requires an HTTP/2 server to present a certificate which covers more than one server hostname. The certificate may use the Subject Alternative Name extension or wildcarded domain names. In addition, URLSession requires name resolution to resolve the different hostnames to the same IP address. URLSession may reuse HTTP/2 connections across different domain names when these conditions are satisfied. (37507838)

Deprecations
The ftp:// and file:// URL schemes for Proxy Automatic Configuration (PAC) are deprecated. HTTP and HTTPS are the only supported URL schemes for PAC. This affects all PAC configurations including, but not limited to, configurations set via Settings, System Preferences, profiles, and URLSession APIs such as connectionProxyDictionary, and CFNetworkExecuteProxyAutoConfigurationURL(_:_:_:_:). (37811761)

Open GL and Open CL
The APIs in the OpenGL and OpenCL frameworks are deprecated and remain present for compatibility purposes. Transition to Metal if your app is using OpenGL or OpenCL.

Privacy
Apps that call the scanForNetworks(withName:) method can no longer obtain the MAC address (BSSID) of nearby Wi-Fi access points when Location Services is disabled. If broadcasted, the network name (SSID) remains included in the scan results. (37427543)

Apps can't access protected storage unless they're added to the Application Data category located in the Privacy tab of System Preferences > Security & Privacy. (39798760)

Safari and WebKit
The Safari Extension canLoad API is deprecated. Safari deactivates these extensions and notifies users upon first launch. You can reenable affected extensions using the Extensions pane in Safari preferences. Extensions using canLoad should switch to the Content Blocker model. (33726891)

Legacy NPAPI browser plug-ins are no longer supported in Safari, with the exception of Adobe Flash. These plug-ins won't load and can't be reenabled. (34213078)

Safari no longer supports developer-signed .safariextz packaged legacy Safari Extensions. When you first launch Safari on macOS Mojave, if you have any legacy developer-signed extensions installed, you'll see a notification that such extensions are no longer supported. These extensions can't be reenabled. Safari Extension Gallery extensions remain supported; however, this support will be removed in an upcoming macOS release. Adopt the Safari App Extensions programming model instead. (39007695)

Social Network Integrations
macOS no longer includes built-in integrations with social networking and media sites. Use share extensions if this functionality is desired. For design guidance, see Human Interface Guidelines > Share Extensions.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
We've talked about this on MacInTouch before, but this article seems helpful:
Ars Technica said:
How to make your own bootable macOS 10.14 Mojave USB install drive
... Here's what you need to get started.
  • A Mac that you have administrator access to. We've created Mojave USB stick from both High Sierra and Mojave, but your experience with other versions may vary.
  • An 8GB or larger USB flash drive or an 8GB or larger partition on some other kind of external drive. A USB 3.0 drive will make things significantly faster, but an older USB 2.0 drive will work in a pinch.
  • The macOS 10.14 Mojave installer from the Mac App Store in your Applications folder. The installer will delete itself when you install the operating system, but it can be re-downloaded if necessary.
  • If you want a GUI, take a look at Ben Slaney's Install Disk Creator from MacDaddy. There are other apps out there that do this, but this one is quick and simple.
 


Dan Hamilton

Moderator
I'm finding contradictory information on Mojave compatibility for LastPass. Anyone here have hands-on experience?

I'm also finding no info whatsoever for Garmin Basecamp (which is 32-bit, so on death watch anyway, but I need it in the meantime).

Thanks in advance.
 


I've updated and added some new articles over on MacStrategy:
Comments, updates and corrections are always welcome. I'll be trying to keep them updated regularly over the next few weeks as the fallout from the Mojave launch and subsequent installations proceeds…
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The detailed and comprehensive Ars Technica review of Apple's Mac OS Mojave is out:
Nestled within that review are links to some stunning details about APFS that I had not previously seen:
I strongly recommend viewing Tim Standing's presentation before embracing APFS (or Mojave).

And here's one more link, to Apple's pathetically late and lame documentation on APFS for developers, just arriving now in incomplete form a year after High Sierra started shipping to end users.
Apple said:
Apple File System Reference [PDF]
...
Revision History

2018-09-17

New document that describes the data structures used for read-only access to Apple File System on unencrypted, non-Fusion storage.
 


Photos in Mojave: time to learn some new keyboard shortcuts.

In iPhoto.app, opening a photo in viewer is Return and editing a photo is Command+ E. Playing a video is (traditional for Mac) Spacebar.

In Aperture (reading from a list of shortcuts), there doesn't seem to be a shortcut for opening in viewer. Command + Shift + O edits in external editor. Spacebar starts and stops video.

In Photos.app (prior to Mojave), opening a photo in viewer is Spacebar and editing a photo is Return. There is no keyboard shortcut for playing a video.

In Photos.app (Mojave) opening in viewer is Return and editing is Command + Return. Playing a video is Spacebar.

I guess it's sort of a move back towards a unified Mac interface standard?

Since I have an iMac that can't update to Mojave and a MacBook Air that I have updated, I'm going to try to change the frequently-used shortcuts on one or the other so they are the same.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I thought I'd try Mojave on my test Mac, a 2011 MacBook Pro with third-party SSD that's been a workhorse. First, I noticed that I can't right-click Mojave in the App Store and ignore it, the way I could with High Sierra (after someone here pointed out that secret trick).

But when I tried to download Mojave, the App Store wouldn't let me. This computer, it turns out, isn't supported, and I can't even download the installer software with it.
 


...Still waiting for APFS support in DiskWarrior, though.
This is the single thing holding me back from moving my machines to High Sierra/Mojave; without the ability to diagnose/repair directory issues, I can't move up - Alsoft has had the same page up about APFS support for a year. if anyone has any info on when/if DiskWarrior will support APFS, I'd love to know about it, or is there any other app with the kind of directory repair capabilities of DiskWarrior out there that does support APFS?
 


But when I tried to download Mojave, the App Store wouldn't let me. This computer, it turns out, isn't supported, and I can't even download the installer software with it.
I feel your pain. My venerable mid-2011 iMac is still a strong and dependable performer, and I am somewhat dismayed to discover that as of macOS Mojave it has been relegated to the dustbin of no-longer-supported Mac hardware. As said so often in "The Life of Riley", "what a revoltin' development!". Ahh... progress.
 



This is the single thing holding me back from moving my machines to High Sierra/Mojave; without the ability to diagnose/repair directory issues, I can't move up - Alsoft has had the same page up about APFS support for a year. if anyone has any info on when/if DiskWarrior will support APFS, I'd love to know about it, or is there any other app with the kind of directory repair capabilities of DiskWarrior out there that does support APFS?
I have DiskWarrior and have used it and its predecessors for a long time. It has been very useful in the past. However, I do not believe I have used it to fix anything for a number of years. This suggests that OS X is possibly more robust than in the past, and the security benefits of more recent macOS releases may greatly outweigh the current loss of DiskWarrior.
 


This is the single thing holding me back from moving my machines to High Sierra/Mojave; without the ability to diagnose/repair directory issues, I can't move up - Alsoft has had the same page up about APFS support for a year. if anyone has any info on when/if DiskWarrior will support APFS, I'd love to know about it, or is there any other app with the kind of directory repair capabilities of DiskWarrior out there that does support APFS?
As I mentioned recently, I had similar concerns and chose to install High Sierra on an SSD that I set up with GUID partitioning and the HFS+ Journaled file system. If you have extra external drives, I suspect you can perform the same trick with Mojave:
  1. Clone your current drive to an external drive using Carbon Copy Cloner.
  2. Boot from that external drive.
  3. Format another external drive as GUID/HFS+ and set it aside.
  4. Upgrade to Mojave on your booted external, which likely will shove APFS on you.
  5. Clone the upgraded Mojave over to the HFS+ drive.
  6. Boot from that HFS+ drive.
  7. Test everything.
  8. Then finally clone Mojave on the HFS+ drive back over to your original drive, which you could also reformat as GUID/HFS+ ahead of time, if it is not.
Feel like being a guinea pig?
 


So far, Mojave's most annoying, niggling, nit-picking "feature:"

Every time I choose Apple > System Preferences, it immediately goes to the Software Update panel and begins checking (even though I have it all disabled).

It doesn't do this when opened from the dock, but who needs another icon in the dock when a menu is that close?

I don't know if it would do this if there weren't printer drivers it insists I should download, even though mine are all as new or newer, but direct from the manufacturer. I have had much less hassle using the manufacturer's installs.

FYI, I first installed it on an OS X 10.11 bootable external hard drive. It converted the drive to APFS.

Adobe CS6 appears to be working, just the expected 32-64 bit warnings, and the removal of my empty Java folders to fool Adobe Illustrator.
 




Nestled within that review are links to some stunning details about APFS that I had not previously seen:
I strongly recommend viewing Tim Standing's presentation before embracing APFS (or Mojave).
OMG! Tim Standing's presentation scared the bejeezus out of me. Until I hear of only good reports coming from MacInTouch members (regarding reliability, data recovery, etc.), APFS is banned from my system. I'm playing with Mojave but on an HFS+ SSD partition.
 


Dan Hamilton

Moderator
I've updated and added some new articles over on MacStrategy…
Very useful info. Thank you. A question: LastPass is shown on your site as not compatible but due to get an update. In their forum I see conflicting info, with some users saying a "new version" was released months ago during Mojave beta and others saying it doesn't work. Any insights?
 


I have an old Filemaker 12 database that I would like to continue to access for info, but don't need to update. It runs OK for my purposes under High Sierra. Anyone know if Filemaker 12 can run (at all) under Mojave? Thanks!
 


Can anybody (hopefully more than one anybody) confirm that Aperture still works with the release version of Mojave??
Aperture has had only a few visual quirks before Mojave, but now it's quite a few times, importing new photos. This may be the warning that its days really are numbered. I haven't read that there is any really comparable DAM/photo editor for the Mac. Ugh.
 


I thought I'd try Mojave on my test Mac, a 2011 MacBook Pro with third-party SSD that's been a workhorse. First, I noticed that I can't right-click Mojave in the App Store and ignore it, the way I could with High Sierra (after someone here pointed out that secret trick). But when I tried to download Mojave, the App Store wouldn't let me. This computer, it turns out, isn't supported, and I can't even download the installer software with it.
There is a fellow named Collin (dosdude1) who has been creating "Patcher Tools for Unsupported Macs" for a while now.

I used his Sierra Patcher to run Sierra on my 2008 MacBook Pro "Core 2 Duo" 2.53GHz 15" (unibody). This computer was essentially unusable, but I threw in a 500GB Samsung 850 SSD and then CCC'd my already installed version of Sierra, and it's working great! Day to day activities work fine and I can even run Logic X with no problem. FCP X isn't perfect, because of the slow graphics card, but it's usable. (Since I did not need to do a fresh install of Sierra, but instead cloned it, I skipped most of his steps until I got to Step 8: open the "macOS Post Install" application - which maybe took about 3 minutes to complete.

Dosdude1 has a new patcher now for Mojave:

I haven't tried it yet, but based my experience with his Sierra Patcher, it is likely to be fine for these 2011 machines that are still very usable.
 


24 hours after a flawless Mojave install on a MacBook Pro 13" (late 2013)...
The install went smoothly, no double-restarts, etc. My "everyday" apps all working fine (iWork, Mail, Firefox, Fantastical, MS Office 2016 and 2011, Quicken 2018, Evernote, Default Folder, Chronosync, Carbon Copy Cloner, TechTool Pro, Filemaker Pro, Snap-n-drag), though I haven't tried all the apps yet. Several everyday apps needed updates (SpamSieve, EtreCheck, 1Password, Fantastical, Default Folder included).

Had a bit of trouble updating the browser extensions for 1Password; Agilebits really doesn't make it easy for its customers, with their two distinct apps distributed with the same name and same version numbers. One version is the "subscription only" version, the other is the standalone app; they work differently. A bit scary losing access to passwords, even temporarily, while futzing around getting their browser extensions working again. But they're back now.

It's going to take some time getting used to "dark mode." I switched back to normal ("light mode") after a couple of hours. A bit too gloomy for me. But I'll give it a try again when there's less other pressure. I'm actually going to miss "stationery" in Mail (I use it periodically to help automate/format mass email sendouts to a group), but that's a small loss.

Things seem a bit zippier running Mojave, perhaps the result of under-the-hood improvements.
 


So… nearly a decade ago, Apple added a Reduce Transparency option to Mac OS X 10.5, because a bunch of us threw a hissy-fit when they screwed with the colors of our GUI items based on whatever was on the desktop background.

Fast-forward to Mojave, and they doubled down on their original error. Now, instead of returning the GUI elements to the original white or gray colors, Apple actively colorizes them based on your desktop background. Example based on some default purple flowers Apple includes with their desktops…

Take extra care to note that it's not only sidebars, but dialog boxes, Spotlight, notification elements, floating palettes like the Activity palette in Mail, etc., etc,, etc. Anything and everything that would normally be transparent is instead some hideous shade of purple.

Now would be an excellent time for everyone to provide some feedback on this to Apple, if you're like me and really, really hate it.
 


I had been looking forward to having a compatible DVD Player with the advent of Mojave. Well, it does have a native DVD player, but it's broken and fails to recognize an OWC Mercury Pro drive that worked perfectly before Mojave. Spent over an hour with Apple support trying this and that, but nothing worked. Sometimes disc would mount on desktop, other times not. Finally high-tier Apple guy said the fault was with the OWC drive and not Mojave. Typical Apple response.
 


Interesting: If you have more than one monitor, Dynamic Desktops can be set individually for each. I don't see a way to stretch one picture over two monitors, so you can select the same pic for each, or live with the different pic for each.
 



I would be extremely interested if any MacInTouchers more capable than me were testing to determine if Mojave "works" on a non-Metal iMac (in my case, mid-2011 iMac 27"). I'd love to upgrade for the performance improvements, if it's possible to do so. I'm not a heavy graphics user, but I probably don't really realize all the ways "Metal" graphics affects my systems.
Thanks for any advice.
Just tried a quick attempt. Plugged an external Mojave HD (not an installer) into my 2011 MacBook Pro, selected that HD at the initial "option-key" screen, and was dumped into a command-line screen which said that Mojave could not run on this Mac. Will need some hacks that are beyond my pay grade.
 


Does anyone else with an iMac (5K, 2017) running with a second screen have a failure to wake from sleep issue with Mojave? It began immediately after I updated the OS, and while clicking my mouse causes the computer to sound like it's waking... both screens remain dark. Only a push-button restart brings it back to life. I tried resetting the SMC and NVRAM to no avail.
 


A note of warning to those planning to update to Mojave who also use Little Snitch:

Update Little Snitch to the newest version before updating to Mojave.

I updated the OS this morning and afterwards discovered that Safari would not connect to anything. At some point, the iMac displayed a window stating that Little Snitch must be updated - but how to do that if Safari won't connect? After a frustrating time, I discovered that Firefox would connect. Accessed the Little Snitch website from Firefox, got the update, and installed same, and now Safari - and Apple Mail - work again.
 


I will add that Adobe Creative Cloud Desktop also would not connect to Adobe's servers after updating to Mojave, until I'd updated Little Snitch.
 



So far, Mojave's most annoying, niggling, nit-picking "feature:"

Every time I choose Apple > System Preferences, it immediately goes to the Software Update panel and begins checking (even though I have it all disabled).

It doesn't do this when opened from the dock, but who needs another icon in the dock when a menu is that close?
As another data point. I'm not getting this behaviour. Admittedly, I'm testing it on a clean install of the publicly available installer from Monday on a Mac Mini (2014 model), not from an upgrade. I tested this with System Preferences > "Close windows when quitting an app" ticked and unticked.
 


Very useful info. Thank you. A question: LastPass is shown on your site as not compatible but due to get an update. In their forum I see conflicting info, with some users saying a "new version" was released months ago during Mojave beta and others saying it doesn't work. Any insights?
I saw it listed as having issues on a few forums so added it to my article. No personal experience, sorry. LastPass haven't released anything recently that specifically adds Mojave compatibility - see their release notes history. I'm sure they'll get a compatible update out soon.
 


Photos in Mojave: time to learn some new keyboard shortcuts.

In Photos.app (prior to Mojave), opening a photo in viewer is Spacebar and editing a photo is Return. There is no keyboard shortcut for playing a video.

In Photos.app (Mojave) opening in viewer is Return and editing is Command + Return. Playing a video is Spacebar.

I guess it's sort of a move back towards a unified Mac interface standard?
Unified? You'd assume that Apple would update their own Photos keyboard shortcuts list then… (as of 26th September 2018 they haven't!)
 


Drive Genius is still at version 5.2.2. As is sometimes the case with MacUpdate they are either early or late with listing updates.
I did a clean install of Mojave yesterday, and when I went to download Drive Genius again from the web site, it gave me version 5.2.2. However, once installed, it invited me to update to version 5.3.
 


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