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Unfortunately, it looks like one of the new "features" in the AutoUpdater application is the "Turn On Automatic Updates" nag notification. It's been appearing on my two main Macs frequently since at least the February update, if not the January one.

Beyond how much I dislike being distracted by an unwanted pop-up while I'm trying to concentrate on my work, I despise the coercive choice between "Turn On" and "Not Now" in response to "Always install new features and updates for Microsoft apps." How about, "Never! Just let me know when there is an actual update, and let me decide if and when to install it!"

On top of that, if I decide to open the AutoUpdate app manually, instead of the historic behavior of going directly to the "check for updates" dialog, it now also prompts me to turn on automatic updates before letting me accomplish my desired task.

Why is it so hard for companies to understand that when I explicitly choose to be notified of updates only, I actually mean that I only want to be notified of updates? If I keep getting these disruptive notifications, I'm going to disable all notifications, which, I presume, is even worse in Microsoft's eyes.

I'm going to submit a request to Microsoft to disable this disrespectful "feature," but if anyone knows how to turn off this particular nag while keeping notifications of actual updates active, I'd love to hear about it.
Although I subscribe to Office 365 and can use Office 2019, I use Office 2016. The reason I chose this is that with 2019 the font menu lists fonts that are available for download from the cloud. Unlike the PC version, there is no way to turn this off, at least there wasn't when 2019 was first released. In addition, I don't get nagged for updates. Office 2016 provides all I need.

I have to manually seek updates, but they are available at https://macadmins.software.

I've sent Microsoft two requests to provide the option to turn off display of cloud based fonts.
 


There was an update to the automatic updater pushed last night. Not sure if it resolves the nagging issue yet.

At least Microsoft used a standard notification, so you can disable it through the Notifications panel in System Preferences.
 


I just received an alert that there is a new release of the Microsoft AutoUpdate tool (now version 4.8.0). The release notes mention "Fixed an issue with MAU Opt Into Automatic Updates’ Prompt for MacOS 10.10," but I doubt that refers to disabling the nag feature.
 


Unfortunately, it looks like one of the new "features" in the AutoUpdater application is the "Turn On Automatic Updates" nag notification. It's been appearing on my two main Macs frequently since at least the February update, if not the January one.

Beyond how much I dislike being distracted by an unwanted pop-up while I'm trying to concentrate on my work, I despise the coercive choice between "Turn On" and "Not Now" in response to "Always install new features and updates for Microsoft apps." How about, "Never! Just let me know when there is an actual update, and let me decide if and when to install it!"

On top of that, if I decide to open the AutoUpdate app manually, instead of the historic behavior of going directly to the "check for updates" dialog, it now also prompts me to turn on automatic updates before letting me accomplish my desired task.

Why is it so hard for companies to understand that when I explicitly choose to be notified of updates only, I actually mean that I only want to be notified of updates? If I keep getting these disruptive notifications, I'm going to disable all notifications, which, I presume, is even worse in Microsoft's eyes.

I'm going to submit a request to Microsoft to disable this disrespectful "feature," but if anyone knows how to turn off this particular nag while keeping notifications of actual updates active, I'd love to hear about it.
I second the comments. For me, it is worse, as I run an older version for which there is no update. So why nag me about checking for updates when there are no updates.
 


I second the comments. For me, it is worse, as I run an older version for which there is no update. So why nag me about checking for updates when there are no updates.
I'm was in the same situation with an older version of Office. Since no updates will be forthcoming, I got rid of the nuisance notification using AppDelete.
 


Unfortunately, it looks like one of the new "features" in the AutoUpdater application is the "Turn On Automatic Updates" nag notification....
I switched my prefs in the MS Autoupdate application to "Manually check," and that seems to have stopped the nag. (Of course, now I do a "manual" check from the MS applications' "Help" menu whenever I run the apps, to be sure I'm not missing an update. But at least I don't get nagged when I'm working.)
 


I switched my prefs in the MS Autoupdate application to "Manually check," and that seems to have stopped the nag. (Of course, now I do a "manual" check from the MS applications' "Help" menu whenever I run the apps, to be sure I'm not missing an update. But at least I don't get nagged when I'm working.)
I switched mine to Manually Check and then back to Automatically Check, and now it isn't nagging me. your milage may vary
 



Since I did the MAU update the other day, the nagging has stopped!
I did the MAU update, but I'm still getting the nag. I haven't done rigorous testing, but it seems to be appearing at least on the first launch (or shortly thereafter) of an Office app after logging in (e.g. after a reboot or after logout/login).
 


I spoke too soon. Over the weekend, I've had 5 pop up notifications trying to get me to turn on Automatic updates in MAU. One of them happened after I dismissed one, left the room and came back to find another one. I finally just edited the plist in LaunchAgents to disable it and set an event every Saturday to check.

I did notice that the plist had a setting to run twice a day (every 43200 seconds), not sure why that only kicked in recently.
 


I’m having a problem with an Office 365 (Office 2016) installation on my iMac 18 (running Sierra). I previously had Office 2011 on it and removed it (fully) before installing the Office 365 download. That process went very smoothly and I was quickly up and running after an initial launch requiring me to log in to my Microsoft account. That was about a month ago.

Yesterday, my wife logged in to the machine and started using Word to edit a document. After getting the splash screen about logging in to my Microsoft account and entering my email address, the process stuck with “Loading” being displayed but never prompting for a password. We eventually just had her log in to my account and do her editing there.

Afterwards, I tried the process again (and also with the three other Office components I had installed), and each failed in the same way. Since I had my wife’s account configured as a non-admin account, I decided to try launching the apps from my administrator account to see if it was a privilege issue. Same failure mechanism there as well. My account is also configured as an admin account, and it still launches all four Office apps quite happily.

I thought that perhaps adding my wife’s email as a family member on Office 365 would allow her to access the apps, so I did that, but that also did not work (the “Loading” hangup occurs with both of our email addresses).

This is the first serious hiccup I’ve had with Office 365. I have it installed on another iMac (running El Capitan) and on a couple of i-devices, and each install has gone quite smoothly. On the second iMac I had activated the Office apps from my wife’s account using my Microsoft credentials, and there, I found a moment ago, the apps run fine from her account but not from mine.

Do these symptoms ring a bell with anybody, and is there a solution, or am I missing something obvious about Office 365? My internet searching so far on the Office support site finds a similar problem reported for some users during the initial download/install using one account or trying to update, but I’m not able to find anyone describing my scenario where the account that installed it is working just fine, but other accounts can’t get access to the apps.

Thanks in advance and apologies for the long-winded post; I always prefer to ask my questions here first, due to the audience expertise.
 


I’m having a problem with an Office 365 (Office 2016) installation on my iMac 18 (running Sierra). I previously had Office 2011 on it and removed it (fully) before installing the Office 365 download. That process went very smoothly and I was quickly up and running after an initial launch requiring me to log in to my Microsoft account. That was about a month ago.

Yesterday, my wife logged in to the machine and started using Word to edit a document. After getting the splash screen about logging in to my Microsoft account and entering my email address, the process stuck with “Loading” being displayed but never prompting for a password. We eventually just had her log in to my account and do her editing there.

Afterwards, I tried the process again (and also with the three other Office components I had installed), and each failed in the same way. Since I had my wife’s account configured as a non-admin account, I decided to try launching the apps from my administrator account to see if it was a privilege issue. Same failure mechanism there as well. My account is also configured as an admin account, and it still launches all four Office apps quite happily.
Not sure I understand. In the final paragraph I've quoted, you say attempting to launch Office 365 apps failed in your administrator account, then in the very next sentence state that the apps launch without any issues in that account. Full disclosure: I'm not promising to provide you a solution, given that I'm new to Office 365 (long-delayed update from Office Mac 2008) and brand new to Mojave within the last 24 hours.
 


Not sure I understand. In the final paragraph I've quoted, you say attempting to launch Office 365 apps failed in your administrator account, then in the very next sentence state that the apps launch without any issues in that account. Full disclosure: I'm not promising to provide you a solution, given that I'm new to Office 365 (long-delayed update from Office Mac 2008) and brand new to Mojave within the last 24 hours.
Sorry, I definitely could have phrased things better.

On the machine in question there are 3 accounts:
  • administrator
  • mine (with admin access)
  • spouse (nonadmin)
Office 365 apps will only launch from my account. The authentication process in the other two accounts hangs up after entering my email address and clicking “next”. I never get the chance to enter a password and there is a “Loading...” message displayed.

The purpose of mentioning the administrator account having the same problem was to give some evidence that I wasn’t dealing with a permissions issue.
 


I think you'll get an answer quickly from Microsoft support. You might not like what they tell you, but they know the Mac versions of their Office apps well.

For example, the Windows version of Excel 365 has a very extensive context-sensitive help system: hover the pointer over a ribbon icon, and you'll get a bubble containing an explanation of how to use the feature, and sometimes links to multi-paragraph examples of doing so. On the Mac (assuming you have Office configured to show the names of ribbon icons) when you hover over an icon, you'll get get -- wait for it -- one more iteration of the name of the icon, and nothing more!

I've also seen instances on the Mac where the help system will pop-up Windows keyboard shortcuts for menu items or ribbon icons. But the support people will probably know that already and try to convince you that Windows and Mac versions get equal attention!
 


Office 365 apps will only launch from my account. The authentication process in the other two accounts hangs up after entering my email address and clicking “next”. I never get the chance to enter a password and there is a “Loading...” message displayed.
Check this page:
I would suggest running the license removal tool while logged into an account that it locks up on. In addition, I would remove all Microsoft entries from the keychain, then restart, and try to sign in again.
 


For example, the Windows version of Excel 365 has a very extensive context-sensitive help system: hover the pointer over a ribbon icon, and you'll get a bubble containing an explanation of how to use the feature, and sometimes links to multi-paragraph examples of doing so. On the Mac (assuming you have Office configured to show the names of ribbon icons) when you hover over an icon, you'll get get -- wait for it -- one more iteration of the name of the icon, and nothing more!

I've also seen instances on the Mac where the help system will pop-up Windows keyboard shortcuts for menu items or ribbon icons. But the support people will probably know that already and try to convince you that Windows and Mac versions get equal attention!
That is because the Mac version of Office only supports "ScreenTips" (a.k.a. ToolTips) but does not support "SuperTips", which allow for a paragraph or more explanation to be displayed - one of the many things where the Mac version of Office 365 lags behind its Windows counterpart.
 


I'm told by a Windows-using colleague that Office has more math-type capabilities on the Windows side than the Mac does. Having been told about her procedure to set up expressions with integrals, complex vertical fractions, and roots, I found I couldn't follow along. Neither my copies of Office 2011 (with Equation Editor) or 2016 could do what she described.
 


Check this page:
I would suggest running the license removal tool while logged into an account that it locks up on. In addition, I would remove all Microsoft entries from the keychain, then restart, and try to sign in again.
In the end, the resolution was to completely remove Office 365, including license removal, and to install an earlier build of Office 16 (highest supported version on macOS 10.12), as there is a known bug with Sierra and the latest builds of Office 2016. (The alternative was to upgrade to High Sierra, which I did not want to do.) All is now working as desired, and auto update is disabled.
 


In the end, the resolution was to completely remove Office 365, including license removal, and to install an earlier build of Office 16 (highest supported version on macOS 10.12), as there is a known bug with Sierra and the latest builds of Office 2016. (The alternative was to upgrade to High Sierra, which I did not want to do.) All is now working as desired, and auto update is disabled.
Can you elaborate on this known bug with the latest builds of Office 2016 on Sierra (macOS10.12)? I am having issues as you describe with the standalone perpetual license version of Office 2016 on a Sierra machine (not the newer 16.20-ish of the Office365 "2019" track). Enter my Microsoft ID email address, click next, get a "loading" message and never get to a page asking for a password.
 


Can you elaborate on this known bug with the latest builds of Office 2016 on Sierra (macOS10.12)? I am having issues as you describe with the standalone perpetual license version of Office 2016 on a Sierra machine (not the newer 16.20-ish of the Office365 "2019" track). Enter my Microsoft ID email address, click next, get a "loading" message and never get to a page asking for a password.
Sorry for the delay in replying, but I had to wait until I got home to look up the specifics on the bug number and the build number of Office that I am now running.

I worked with two different Microsoft support techs; the second one knew how to work around the problem, which is BUG936589 and affects Office 2016 running in Sierra (10.12).

The tech, taking control of my machine via Logmein, went to the Office web page and downloaded the Office 2016 installer (unfortunately, this navigation went very quickly and I didn’t see precisely the page/link he clicked on). The installer downloaded is named “Microsoft_Office_2016_Iinstaller.pkg”. A Get Info on that installer shows that it was downloaded from:

http://officecdn.microsoft.com.edgesuite.net/sg/C1297A47-86C4-4C1F-97FA-950631F94777/OfficeMac/Microsoft_Office_2016_Installer.pkg

After installing and launching one of the apps (Excel), the About window shows the version/build to be 15.19.1 (160212).

So, the nuking of the previous install and installation of an older version of 2016 has me up and running again. If you can’t find an older installer and get this process to work on your ow,n I recommend contacting Microsoft Support and referencing the above bug number, as both techs were well aware of it.

Good luck
 


This is a known problem with both subscription and non-subscription Office 2016/2019 and 365 for Mac, especially on 10.12 Sierra. After going up the support chain to an Office Mac person (4 levels, 3 phone calls and 2 hours hold time) I was instructed to completely remove Office (no uninstaller, manually according to Uninstall Office for Mac) then install an earlier version as noted above.

However, I set aside my Outlook info. before doing so, as this procedure will remove all of it. While this earlier version will register properly, it will not open my current up-to-date Outlook data.

So I opened Word, and from there went to the update app (under Help in Word) and selected only Outlook to update. Once that installed, the activation remained intact and I could open my Outlook mail after putting it back in the appropriate location.

It's important to select manual updates in the app, and you will be nagged about it in every Office app, but until they fix the problem it is imperative not to update anything else.

The tech. said I would have to archive my mail and reimport it into Outlook for it to work with the older version. That would have taken more hours. This method is a "cheat" to use the existing info. I did lose my Outlook settings, but it kept the account info. and mail intact.
 



... I worked with two different Microsoft support techs; the second one knew how to work around the problem, which is BUG936589 and affects Office 2016 running in Sierra (10.12)....
I can confirm that Office 2016 16.6.8 (Home & Business perpetual license) under macOS Sierra (10.12.6) would launch, allow me to click the Sign In button, allow me to enter the email address of my Microsoft ID, then get stuck "loading" and never ask for my password.

Updating the computer to macOS Mojave (10.14.3) solved the problem. If I have to try this on a machine I intend to keep on Sierra, I'll report back if downgrading to a prior release of Office 2016 worked.
 


I can confirm that Office 2016 16.6.8 (Home & Business perpetual license) under macOS Sierra (10.12.6) would launch, allow me to click the Sign In button, allow me to enter the email address of my Microsoft ID, then get stuck "loading" and never ask for my password.
Updating the computer to macOS Mojave (10.14.3) solved the problem. If I have to try this on a machine I intend to keep on Sierra, I'll report back if downgrading to a prior release of Office 2016 worked.
Slightly different process: not signing in, just skipped that part (with the "skip" button). Office 16.16.8, Sierra 10.12.6. All running okay, but I never "sign in".
 


Slightly different process: not signing in, just skipped that part (with the "skip" button). Office 16.16.8, Sierra 10.12.6. All running okay, but I never "sign in".
If you have a perpetual license, then signing in should only be necessary for accessing Microsoft's cloud services (e.g. OneDrive or the web versions of the apps).

If you have purchased an Office 365 subscription, then I believe that sign-in is necessary for the app to actually run.
 


If you have a perpetual license, then signing in should only be necessary for accessing Microsoft's cloud services (e.g. OneDrive or the web versions of the apps). If you have purchased an Office 365 subscription, then I believe that sign-in is necessary for the app to actually run.
At the office we have 40 or 50 "perpetual" (meaning not, of course, actually perpetual) Mac Office 2016 Home and Business individual licenses. After installation each license has to be activated for use, which requires signing in to a Microsoft ID account.

As part of this whole process, the product key becomes permanently locked to that Microsoft ID. On the plus side, the installation can readily be moved to another Mac when required.
 


At the office we have 40 or 50 "perpetual" (meaning not, of course, actually perpetual) Mac Office 2016 Home and Business individual licenses. After installation each license has to be activated for use, which requires signing in to a Microsoft ID account. As part of this whole process, the product key becomes permanently locked to that Microsoft ID. On the plus side, the installation can readily be moved to another Mac when required.
Are you sure you didn't miss the "skip" button below the "Sign in"? It's not actually a button, more of a "link" sort of appearance, but it's easy to miss it, if you're rushing through the process.
 


Are you sure you didn't miss the "skip" button below the "Sign in"? It's not actually a button, more of a "link" sort of appearance, but it's easy to miss it, if you're rushing through the process.
Yes, I'm sure. Note that these are bulk purchased product keys (licenses), not retail boxed software. I mention that because, at least in the past, the exact installation procedures and limitations for earlier versions of MS Office could vary depending on how or when the software was sourced.
 


If you have purchased an Office 365 subscription, then I believe that sign-in is necessary for the app to actually run.
Perhaps a minor point, but if I recall correctly, you can run Office 365 apps in a read-only "Reduced Functionality Mode" if you don't sign-in or if your subscription lapses.
 


Perhaps a minor point, but if I recall correctly, you can run Office 365 apps in a read-only "Reduced Functionality Mode" if you don't sign-in or if your subscription lapses.
If true, does this mean that you could download and run, say, Powerpoint, in a player-only type mode? I may have a need to do such a thing in a month or so.
 



If you have a perpetual license, then signing in should only be necessary for accessing Microsoft's cloud services (e.g. OneDrive or the web versions of the apps).

If you have purchased an Office 365 subscription, then I believe that sign-in is necessary for the app to actually run.
With a brand new installation of a perpetual license using MS Office 2016 v.16.16.8 under macOS Sierra (10.12.x), not only could I not sign in, I could not activate the new installation, and thus I could not save any changes. In my case, updating to macOS Mojave 10.14.3 solved the issue. (In my earlier post, I stated I was using Office 2016 16.6.8: that was wrong. I was testing this against v. 16.16.8, which came out earlier this month).
 


How does one tell Microsoft Word 2016 (v.16.23) to not open documents in Markup Mode (View Menu > Markup)? I thought all we had to do was go to View > Markup and uncheck, then save. However, the next time the document opens, it is in Markup Mode again.

I found some Windows-oriented Microsoft KB articles that suggest you also have to ensure Track Changes is off, which it is. And, sometimes, the document opens and the Markup Mode pane does not appear, but View > Markup is checked, and if you wait a few seconds, the Markup Mode pane appears.....
 


FYI - Microsoft AutoUpdate (MAU) 4.10.0 showed up for me this morning; however, there is no release information on the Microsoft website. Sigh...
 


FYI - Microsoft AutoUpdate (MAU) 4.10.0 showed up for me this morning; however, there is no release information on the Microsoft website. Sigh...
... and an update to this morning's update then appeared later in the day, bringing the build to 190414. (After that, an update of the full Office package to version 16.24 also arrived.)

On the one hand, I'm glad that at least some issues with these updates seem to be caught and fixed quickly. On the other hand, it seems to be very common these days for companies like Apple and Microsoft to release an update to an update within hours or a day of the original update, which makes me wonder about their QA processes.

FWIW, Microsoft is better than most large companies regarding release notes, but they do have a pattern where they take a day or two to update the Office Release Notes page after AutoUpdate notices a new release. I usually wait until the release notes are published before installing the update.

If you want to get a sense for what might be in the update before the release notes are published, you might take a look at the release notes for the "Office Insider" builds, which tend to be about a month or so ahead of the production release. For example, the "Fast Insider" build for 16.24 was available on February 28, 2019. Note, however, that not every change seen in an "Insider" build of a particular version always makes it into the final production release of that version.
 


Got one weird question: Why is it that each time when there is an update, the Microsoft AutoUpdate (MAU) itself also has to be updated? Just seems strange to me.
 



FWIW, Microsoft is better than most large companies regarding release notes, but they do have a pattern where they take a day or two to update the Office Release Notes page after AutoUpdate notices a new release. I usually wait until the release notes are published before installing the update.
Then when do you install the OneNote updates? OneNote is updated every time, but there are never any release notes describing the changes.
 


FWIW, Microsoft is better than most large companies regarding release notes, but they do have a pattern where they take a day or two to update the Office Release Notes page after AutoUpdate notices a new release. I usually wait until the release notes are published before installing the update.
Great tip, Jose, to wait for the release notes publishing! While trying to stay ahead of the stable releases for applications, I do try to read through the release notes before I do any updates, on my IT laptop first. This way I am well informed of the "gotchas" and fixes, before we do the updates on other devices around our office.
 


Then when do you install the OneNote updates? OneNote is updated every time, but there are never any release notes describing the changes.
Microsoft must have been listening to you. They just updated the Office 365/2019 release notes with some OneNote changes. (if I recall correctly, there are no more feature enhancements scheduled for OneNote 2016.)

As an aside, I just spent much more time than I intended thinking about why I've tended to put OneNote and some of the newer MS Office tools (like Teams) in a different category from the traditional Office apps with consequently different expectations for reliability and consistency, and it may be partially related to the lack of detailed OneNote release notes.

Interestingly, Evernote, which I use much more frequently than OneNote, generally has good release notes, and its updater actually displays the release notes when it asks if you'd like to update. It leaves me feeling more in control of my own computing experience.
 


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