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Office 2019 will not open Word files from 1997, even running under Mojave. I was able to access them with LibreOffice, but the formatting was hosed, which can be a serious problem if you need access to the original production files, or format-sensitive information like tables. I had earlier saved the original .doc files in RTF format, and those also had the formatting - including vital reference citations - hosed by Office 2019.

I was able to rescue the critical files for one of my major books by opening the files in Word 2011 on a 2009 MacBook Pro running ElCapitan, and converted the files into .docx format that opens properly on Office 2019. No time to dig into this further, but at this point it looks like those of us with vital old files may need to keep old machines around to rescue the files from oblivion.
 


Office 2019 will not open Word files from 1997, even running under Mojave. I was able to access them with LibreOffice, but the formatting was hosed, which can be a serious problem if you need access to the original production files, or format-sensitive information like tables. I had earlier saved the original .doc files in RTF format, and those also had the formatting - including vital reference citations - hosed by Office 2019.

I was able to rescue the critical files for one of my major books by opening the files in Word 2011 on a 2009 MacBook Pro running ElCapitan, and converted the files into .docx format that opens properly on Office 2019. No time to dig into this further, but at this point it looks like those of us with vital old files may need to keep old machines around to rescue the files from oblivion.
And I have PICT files from 1997 and before that won't open in anything Apple provides now. I have to pay for (admittedly inexpensive) third-party software to do so. Office, though, is not particularly inexpensive. And when Office 2019 support expires (c. 2023), the payment will become annual, because there'll only be Office 365.
 


And when Office 2019 support expires (c. 2023), the payment will become annual, because there'll only be Office 365.
Did Microsoft confirm that there will be no more perpetual Office releases after 2019? Your post is the first I've heard about that.

Or is that just a guess that happens to have a high likelihood of becoming true?
 


And I have PICT files from 1997 and before that won't open in anything Apple provides now. I have to pay for (admittedly inexpensive) third-party software to do so. Office, though, is not particularly inexpensive. And when Office 2019 support expires (c. 2023), the payment will become annual, because there'll only be Office 365.
Microsoft have not stated anywhere (that I am aware of) that after Office 2019 there will only be a subscription version - they have specifically stated perpetual licensing is available for Office 2019. Yes, they are pushing people to subscription, but they have not (yet) committed to subscription only (with Office). Unless you have a link to information that states otherwise? What did change recently is that a perpetual license of Office 2019 is no longer available under the Home Use Program (HUP). For reference:

Office 2016 support runs out on 13/10/2020
Office 2019 support runs out on 10/10/2023

But also, as noted here, support for security updates for Office 2019/Office 365 is now also determined by the version of macOS that you are running.
 


I did some further checking, and Word 2019's behavior is not as bad as I had thought, but it does not recognize older .doc and .rtf files that lack the ".doc" and ".rtf" suffixes on the file names. It opens most with suffixes that I have tried, but I have not tested enough to be sure it opens them all.

What Word 2019 does not have is an option to let users pick options of what type of files to open in the Open Document box, which I have in Word 2011 and which I have been told exists in Word 2016. The bottom line is that we have lost some capabilities that existed before, but I can't define them precisely.

Nisus Writer Pro does not recognize old doc files without suffixes but will open them as text. I have not checked all my other options, and need to deal with deadlines now.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... it does not recognize older .doc and .rtf files that lack the ".doc" and ".rtf" suffixes on the file names....
Apple changed how file types are determined over the years, so that filename extensions are now critical to proper operation (although this wasn't the case in the past). Adding/using the appropriate file type extension at the end of the filename is the first thing to do now when working with any files that lack it.
 


Apple changed how file types are determined over the years, so that filename extensions are now critical to proper operation (although this wasn't the case in the past). Adding/using the appropriate file type extension at the end of the filename is the first thing to do now when working with any files that lack it.
Ouch! I probably have 10,000 such files. The good news is that I discovered I can use the Finder Rename option in my copious spare time, although it also makes me 'ok' everything.
 




A Better Finder Rename is a great app for adding suffixes to multiple files at once (plus a lot of other ways of renaming files). Also, Document Converter (www.rootrisetech.com) will bulk-convert doc files to docx (as well as PowerPoint and Excel files). I've converted a lot of old files with that app and am a happy user (with no official connection).
 


Microsoft have not stated anywhere (that I am aware of) that after Office 2019 there will only be a subscription version - they have specifically stated perpetual licensing is available for Office 2019. Yes, they are pushing people to subscription, but they have not (yet) committed to subscription only (with Office). Unless you have a link to information that states otherwise? What did change recently is that a perpetual license of Office 2019 is no longer available under the Home Use Program (HUP). For reference:

Office 2016 support runs out on 13/10/2020
Office 2019 support runs out on 10/10/2023

But also, as noted here, support for security updates for Office 2019/Office 365 is now also determined by the version of macOS that you are running.
For Windows, at least, you are absolutely right; my apologies. My guess is that a new version will also be available for macOS in the same time frame.

An article last year (caution: lots of pro-Microsoft puffery about the wonderful features to be found in Office 365 apps not available to stick-in-the-mud, non-cloud customers) clarified the situation with a comment from a Microsoft VP. The 365-only features most frequently mentioned online are "machine learning capabilities," "intelligent security features," and realtime document collaboration. The first two are just scary, and absent a legally binding commitment from Microsoft not to profit from documents stored in their cloud, the last is not much better. your milage may vary, but I generally used document collaboration, while I was still working, with people in other time zones, so the chances of realtime collaboration were small, so that wouldn't have been a major selling point for me. If, however, you work in a mostly open-plan office where your coworkers are snoozing or snogging in the few conference rooms, real-time collaboration online might be a thing.

It's just a typically strange Microsoft decision to call a standalone license a "perpetual" one... while committing to having a new product in approximately three years to replace it. (To be fair, Apple would probably call it a "magic" license.)
 





Office 2016 support runs out on 13/10/2020
Office 2019 support runs out on 10/10/2023
But also, as noted here, support for security updates for Office 2019/Office 365 is now also determined by the version of macOS that you are running.
Does anyone have any thoughts on the security risks of continuing to run Office 16 after security updates end, specifically if I'm only working with files I've created? I'd assume in general that's fairly safe, but am probably overlooking something.
 



Does anyone have any thoughts on the security risks of continuing to run Office 16 after security updates end, specifically if I'm only working with files I've created? I'd assume in general that's fairly safe, but am probably overlooking something.
The main security issues seem to be mostly with Word and Excel, with the latter particularly susceptible to "remote code execution vulnerabilities" via opening dodgy files. However, as you say, if you are working only with files you've created yourself, the security risk would be very low.
 


Ouch! I probably have 10,000 such files. The good news is that I discovered I can use the Finder Rename option in my copious spare time, although it also makes me 'ok' everything.
Jeff, Automator still works in Catalina and will add the proper extensions (or anything else you choose) to those 10,000 filenames very quickly.
 


Ouch! I probably have 10,000 such files. The good news is that I discovered I can use the Finder Rename option in my copious spare time, although it also makes me 'ok' everything.
I'll second the recommendations for A Better Finder Rename and Document Converter. Additionally, I'll point out that you can go into Finder > Preferences and uncheck "Show warning before changing an extension"
 






As Henry L. noted last month, macOS 10.13 was required starting with Office 16.31.

This is too bad....my 2011 MacBook Pro runs Office just fine. From what I've read, I'm still leery of putting 10.13 on this machine. Sierra runs well on it, although it's still somewhat less stable than Mavericks was. The MacBook Pro has become a real workhorse for me over the last 18 months (the upgrades to 1TB SSD and 16GB RAM helped a lot).
 


As Henry L. noted last month, macOS 10.13 was required starting with Office 16.31.
This is too bad... my 2011 MacBook Pro runs Office just fine. From what I've read, I'm still leery of putting 10.13 on this machine. Sierra runs well on it, although it's still somewhat less stable than Mavericks was. The MacBook Pro has become a real workhorse for me over the last 18 months (the upgrades to 1TB SSD and 16GB RAM helped a lot).
You can always run Office 2016 on your 2011 MacBook Pro. It will be supported until early October 2020. See the link in the post above from Graham Needham. I have one iMac on El Capitan because of driver problems with a piece of software. It runs Office 2016 flawlessly, or as least as flawlessly as can be expected from Microsoft.
 



You can always run Office 2016 on your 2011 MacBook Pro. It will be supported until early October 2020. See the link in the post above from Graham Needham. I have one iMac on El Capitan because of driver problems with a piece of software. It runs Office 2016 flawlessly, or as least as flawlessly as can be expected from Microsoft.
Keep in mind that Outlook 2016 (and 2011) will likely be unable to connect to G Suite or Gmail as of February 2021, due to Google's forthcoming removal of "less secure app" support. All apps that connect to Google will be required to use OAuth 2.0 to sign in, and Outlook 16.16.x (aka Outlook 2016), at least as of now, does not support it.
 


Keep in mind that Outlook 2016 (and 2011) will likely be unable to connect to G Suite or Gmail as of February 2021, due to Google's forthcoming removal of "less secure app" support. All apps that connect to Google will be required to use OAuth 2.0 to sign in, and Outlook 16.16.x (aka Outlook 2016), at least as of now, does not support it.
Is that true for personal, non-G Suite Gmail and calendaring, too, i.e. accounts that end in gmail.com instead of a custom domain? I don't doubt that Google will make OAuth 2.0 a requirement for their personal Gmail at some point, but I only recall seeing an announcement for the branded G Suite apps.

Also, while it's hard to find a definitive answer in Google's support forums, it seems that turning on an app-specific password with 2-step verification will allow older clients to connect to G Suite once "less secure apps" are no longer allowed.
 


Is that true for personal, non-G Suite Gmail and calendaring, too, i.e. accounts that end in gmail.com instead of a custom domain? I don't doubt that Google will make OAuth 2.0 a requirement for their personal Gmail at some point, but I only recall seeing an announcement for the branded G Suite apps.

Also, while it's hard to find a definitive answer in Google's support forums, it seems that turning on an app-specific password with 2-step verification will allow older clients to connect to G Suite once "less secure apps" are no longer allowed.
I had interpreted the announcement to mean Gmail.com would be impacted too, but you appear to be right -- only G Suite is mentioned, so I stand corrected (at least, as you say, for now). And thanks for the tip regarding app-specific password -- that makes sense, and could be very helpful for tools that may never support OAuth 2.0.
 


With Office 2016, I discovered that the file "MicrosoftRegistrationDB.reg" contains full paths and document names for everything I've worked on for a while. I had previously removed recent documents from Open Recent > More, by right-clicking on each document to remove, so it was surprising to see everything still in this file. "Send full diagnostic data" is unchecked too. Deleting that .reg file did remove a few stuck recent files.
 



I'm unable to receive POP email messages using 2011 MS Outlook. Has anyone else experienced this problem?
Office 2011's Outlook does not support the current TLS (Transport Layer Security) encryption standard. TLS is commonly used to initiate receiving emails. The current common standard is 1.2. Most email providers have turned off earlier versions (1.0 and 1.1).

Typically Outlook would be set up to use port 995 for secure incoming POP email.

Unfortunately, you'll have to use a more modern email app. Both Outlook 2016 and Outlook 2019/365 support modern encryption. I migrated many people from 2011 to 2016 without major issues.

Depending on your email provider, you may be able to get by using a modern web browser and web-based email.
 


With Office 2016, I discovered that the file "MicrosoftRegistrationDB.reg" contains full paths and document names for everything I've worked on for a while. I had previously removed recent documents from Open Recent > More, by right-clicking on each document to remove, so it was surprising to see everything still in this file. "Send full diagnostic data" is unchecked too. Deleting that .reg file did remove a few stuck recent files.
I would be wary of deleting that file. Apparently it contains quite a bit more than the path/document information you are worried about, including a number of preferences, and is a consequence of macOS sandboxing requirements.
Jamf Nation said:
 


I would be wary of deleting that file. Apparently it contains quite a bit more than the path/document information you are worried about, including a number of preferences, and is a consequence of macOS sandboxing requirements.
Perhaps deleting "MicrosoftRegistrationDB.reg" with Office 2016 is an issue for users who log in. I deleted it without issue, the file was recreated, and everything is working fine.
 


I had forgotten to post about this when I noticed it a few weeks ago: The January Office 365/Office 2019 update did not include the latest "Production" version of the OneDrive client, version 19.222.1110.0006. I hadn't noticed this occurring with previous versions of the installers, but perhaps I missed it, or perhaps Microsoft has decided to change its policy on bundling the "Production Ring" version of OneDrive versus the "Enterprise Ring" version in the full Office installer.

In any case, the newest version of OneDrive is downloadable as a separate package on the OneDrive download page. The release notes for the latest release include:
  • Bug fixes to improve reliability and performance of the client.
  • New features gradually rolling out to users:
    • Support for signing in when a conditional access policy is configured.
    • Support for single sign-on when a user is signed in to Office apps.
I've been running the latest version of OneDrive for a few weeks on several machines without trouble.
 



Version 16.34 of Office 365/2019 is available from the Microsoft web site:

and via the AutoUpdate app. It looks like a relatively minor update, primarily impacting Excel:

If you were an early downloader of the website version, you may want to double-check that the version of the installer you downloaded actually was 16.34. It seems that while Microsoft updated the website for version 16.34, the actual download link continued to link to the 16.33 installer until about an hour ago. The site correctly downloads 16.34 now.

I see this sort of thing so often these days from so many companies. I can't say it generates a lot of confidence in their underlying processes.
 


If you were an early downloader of the website version, you may want to double check that the version of the installer you downloaded actually was 16.34. It seems that while Microsoft updated the website for version 16.34, the actual download link continued to link to the 16.33 installer until about an hour ago. The site correctly downloads 16.34 now.
I see this sort of thing so often these days from so many companies. I can't say it generates a lot of confidence in their underlying processes.
I take that back. I tried to run the 16.34 installer, and I was greeted by this warning:
Microsoft_Office_16.34.20020900_BusinessPro_Installer.pkg can’t be installed because its digital signature is invalid. The package may have been corrupted or tampered with. Get a new copy of the package and try again.
The page is back to linking to the 16.33 installer.

What was I saying about confidence in underlying processes?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
It looks like a relatively minor update, primarily impacting Excel:
It looks like one you'd probably want to install...
Microsoft said:
CVE-2020-0759 | Microsoft Excel Remote Code Execution Vulnerability
A remote code execution vulnerability exists in Microsoft Excel … an attacker could take control of the affected system. An attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights…
 


It looks like one you'd probably want to install...
I agree that it should be installed, though the question is "when?"

When I called it a relatively minor update, I meant that there weren't a lot of new features, and, even though it includes a security fix, it's just one fix, and it's not aimed at a high-risk vulnerability. Definitely, it should be fixed, but it's not the sort of security issue where people need to drop everything to patch it immediately, especially in a business environment. Given that Microsoft still hasn't fixed the full 16.34 installer, I think it is ok to wait a day or two for the dust to settle.
 
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