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Version 16.34 of Office 365/2019 is available from the Microsoft web site:
and via the AutoUpdate app. It looks like a relatively minor update, primarily impacting Excel:
If you were an early downloader of the website version, you may want to double-check that the version of the installer you downloaded actually was 16.34. It seems that while Microsoft updated the website for version 16.34, the actual download link continued to link to the 16.33 installer until about an hour ago. The site correctly downloads 16.34 now.

I see this sort of thing so often these days from so many companies. I can't say it generates a lot of confidence in their underlying processes.
Here's another Microsoft website to get Office updates and installers:
 


I have a weird problem in Office 2016. Under the Help menu in Word, Powerpoint and Outlook, I can select Check for Updates. However, in Excel, this option does not appear in the Help menu. I have the latest updates applied, but this has been happening for some time. Has anybody else encountered this problem and, if so, have you found a fix for it?
 


Under the Help menu in Word, Powerpoint and Outlook, I can select Check for Updates. However, in Excel, this option does not appear in the Help menu.
I haven't seen this problem, but it is a relatively minor one that is easily worked around.

All Office apps, when you select "Check For Updates", launch the same external program: Microsoft Auto Update. So you can launch it from Word, PowerPoint or Outlook, and it will still check for Excel updates.

You can also launch it directly, if you're so inclined. The easiest way to do this is to launch it from an Office app, then right-click its Dock icon and select "Options ->
Keep In Dock" from the context menu. Now, you can just click that icon to start it without launching any Office apps.

You can also directly open its app. On my system, it is located in
/Library/Application Support/Microsoft/MAU2.0

You can double-click it or drag it to the Dock for quick access.
 


I haven't seen this problem, but it is a relatively minor one that is easily worked around.
All Office apps, when you select "Check For Updates", launch the same external program: Microsoft Auto Update. So you can launch it from Word, PowerPoint or Outlook, and it will still check for Excel updates.
You can also launch it directly, if you're so inclined. The easiest way to do this is to launch it from an Office app, then right-click its Dock icon and select "Options ->
Keep In Dock" from the context menu. Now, you can just click that icon to start it without launching any Office apps.
You can also directly open its app. On my system, it is located in
/Library/Application Support/Microsoft/MAU2.0
You can double-click it or drag it to the Dock for quick access.
Thank you for your response. That has been my workaround also, but it would be nice to fix the issue.
 


I have a weird problem in Office 2016. Under the Help menu in Word, Powerpoint and Outlook, I can select Check for Updates. However, in Excel, this option does not appear in the Help menu. I have the latest updates applied, but this has been happening for some time. Has anybody else encountered this problem and, if so, have you found a fix for it?
Hmm… I launched my Excel version 16.16.16 (19111) and there is a banner about an Office Update that instructs to choose Check for Updates, which shows under the Help menu. See screen shot.
 


I launched my Excel version 16.16.16 (19111) and there is a banner about an Office Update that instructs to choose Check for Updates
You are running a relatively old version and it is reminding you to check for updates.

I see a similar banner on my installation (Office 365, Excel 16.30 (19101301)). Unfortunately, I can't upgrade, because I'm running macOS Sierra (10.12) and later releases of Office require High Sierra (10.13), so I can't actually install updates, but I can't disable the banner either.
 


You are running a relatively old version and it is reminding you to check for updates.

I see a similar banner on my installation (Office 365, Excel 16.30 (19101301)). Unfortunately, I can't upgrade, because I'm running macOS Sierra (10.12) and later releases of Office require High Sierra (10.13), so I can't actually install updates, but I can't disable the banner either.
Correct. Office 2019 (v16.17+) now requires macOS 10.13 or later. This includes security updates.
 


Hmm… I launched my Excel version 16.16.16 (19111) and there is a banner about an Office Update that instructs to choose Check for Updates, which shows under the Help menu. See screen shot.
It sounds like something has gone wrong with the Excel application/installation. First, I would download and try installing the 16.16.19 update manually over your 16.16.16:
  1. Go to the Update history for Office 2016 for Mac web page
  2. Under "Most current packages for Office 2016 for Mac" look for Excel and click on the "Update package" link
  3. This will download the full 16.16.19 update installer which will update any previous version of Excel 2016
  4. If that doesn't work, as long as you have an Office 365 subscription, delete the Microsoft Excel application from your applications folder
  5. Go back to the Update history for Office 2016 for Mac web page
  6. Under "Most current packages for Office 2016 for Mac" look for Excel and click on the "Install package" link
  7. This will download the full 16.16.19 installer for Excel which will install Excel from scratch
 


You are running a relatively old version and it is reminding you to check for updates.

I see a similar banner on my installation (Office 365, Excel 16.30 (19101301)). Unfortunately, I can't upgrade, because I'm running macOS Sierra (10.12) and later releases of Office require High Sierra (10.13), so I can't actually install updates, but I can't disable the banner either.
True, in that 16.16.16 (191111) is the ancient November 2019 version. Interestingly, the update banner does not show with that version of the other standalone Office 2016 apps. My guess is that the December 2019, January and February 2020 updates had/have security updates for Excel and PowerPoint. Since I didn't like the changes to Excel 2016, I continue to mainly use Excel 2011 and I avoid using PowerPoint. Hence not updating...but will…
 


It sounds like something has gone wrong with the Excel application/installation. First, I would download and try installing the 16.16.19 update manually over your 16.16.16:
Thanks, Graham but it's fine. When I "Check for Updates," the MAU result is "Updates available: 4" for the four applications of Office 2016 to the February 2020 update version 16.16.19. I just had not been using Excel 2016 as stated in an earlier response and my MAU preference is to check manually.
 


On the security of PDFs, etc. I strongly echo "Save As" or similar methods of copying the pages that you want to a new document for elimination of unwanted data. More and more software retains old data while hiding it from view. I partly blame this on poor user interface (the end user is not aware data is just hidden and not deleted). I remember back to Word 4 or 5 when it became standard practice to Select All, Copy and Paste into a new document to lose info that was not meant to be shared.
#security #privacy
Even though the above quote is from a thread about PDFs, I thought I'd mention here that metadata privacy is a serious issue, even today, on common documents like, but not limited to, Microsoft Office documents.

It's happened more than once that I have discovered information ranging from the merely embarrassing to the seriously damaging by looking at document Properties. For example, I learned that a potential supplier's expensive, "proprietary" methods were actually lifted word-for-word from another company's publicly available documents, thanks to the "Company" field in a Word document's Properties. Another time, I learned about a very sensitive business deal long before it was announced because the "Title" field of a Word document had an old title in it.

Whether it is a Microsoft Office document, a PDF, or some other file, it is useful to get into the habit of checking that the file does not contain sensitive metadata before sending it elsewhere.

PS. FWIW, the Windows version of Office is vastly superior to the Mac version in its ability to review and remove metadata:
 


Whether it is a Microsoft Office document, a PDF, or some other file, it is useful to get into the habit of checking that the file does not contain sensitive metadata before sending it elsewhere.
This used to be standard procedure for me when submitting reviews of articles for the scientific journals. The reviews were supposed to be anonymous. To be certain that they were, I would output the Microsoft Word document to PostScript and then edit the Postscript headers. When satisfied that all the identifying metadata was removed, I would convert to PDF. Then I would send it to the chief editor.

Nowadays, these same journals are much better at stripping out the metadata, so this is rarely required.
 


Whether it is a Microsoft Office document, a PDF, or some other file, it is useful to get into the habit of checking that the file does not contain sensitive metadata before sending it elsewhere.
The command-line program ExifTool by Phil Harvey exhaustively displays metadata embedded in Office documents and PDFs (not to mention photo metadata, as implied by its name, and myriad other file types). Homebrew includes it in the exiftool package.
 




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