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Tom, I do know that when you install High Sierra onto a blank hard drive for the first time you have the option between choosing HFS+ or APFS. This holds true and the same for an SSD drive. [See below –MacInTouch]

Since I did not go this route, I’m not sure what you will see when upgrading or using a combo installer for High Sierra. Of course, no matter what, do a full backup of your hard drive before taking the next step.
With High Sierra, spinning drives and Fusion drives are not converted to APFS, only SSD's are, and you are never given the chance to choose an option. With Mojave, all types are converted to APFS, and Apple's current version makes it very slow on spinning drives, mostly due to fragmentation.

If you have another external drive, you can clone to it, reformat your internal drive to HFS+, then clone back – this even works for Mojave. Just be aware that, depending on your Mac model, you may get a warning when trying to update OS items that it can't update, because it requires APFS, creating a Catch-22 problem (especially for T2-based Macs).

My recommendation on spinning drives: do not install APFS, or you will suffer a performance penalty. Also with APFS formatted volumes, Apple's Disk Utility First Aid is the only one that can check an APFS volume for problems. No third-party app yet can work on APFS-formatted volumes including disk defraggers, which on SSD's is only required for Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator, due to their Scratch disk space usage requirements.

One final recommendation, backup, backup, backup, especially with APFS volumes.
 


My recommendation on spinning drives: do not install APFS, or you will suffer a performance penalty. Also with APFS formatted volumes, Apple's Disk Utility First Aid is the only one that can check an APFS volume for problems. No third-party app yet can work on APFS-formatted volumes including disk defraggers, which on SSD's is only required for Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator, due to their Scratch disk space usage requirements.
One final recommendation, backup, backup, backup, especially with APFS volumes.
It has been my experience that changing out spinning hard disks to SSDs, even if the change-out is with a SATA interface, is about the cheapest way to improve an existing machine's performance. This assumes that it is possible or practical to change out the hard disk.

If you cannot change out the hard disk, and your machine has a USB 3 port, running off of a fast external SSD can be a solution. For a laptop it would be awkward. On two iMacs with fusion drives, I have made the external Samsung T5 the boot drive, running off of a USB 3 port. The internal fusion disk becomes the local backup using Carbon Copy Cloner. I also used Carbon Copy Cloner to create the new external boot disk. I am running on Mojave, but this should work for other macOS versions.
 


I'm replacing my aging 2009 iMac with a refurb 2019 27-incher. Does anyone have advice on the easiest way to move to the new machine? Aside from the death of 32-bit, are there any "gotchas" I should look out for? Thanks.
 


I'm replacing my aging 2009 iMac with a refurb 2019 27-incher. Does anyone have advice on the easiest way to move to the new machine? Aside from the death of 32-bit, are there any "gotchas" I should look out for? Thanks.
I should have mentioned that I have a USB 2 Time Machine backup, and a USB 2 / FireWire SuperDuper clone.
 






Migration Assistant (which happens when you tell the new Mac to transfer stuff from another Mac). Connect them with an Ethernet cable.
Migration Assistant has the advantage of copying all your passwords, preferences and (usually) software registration info. The downside is you may get some cruft that causes you issues later. I've had mostly positive experience, though.

My 2018 iMac is "descended from" a 2003 Power Mac G5 through 2008 MacBook Pro and a 2010 iMac. I'm still able to read old emails, which is handy if you do need to enter some software activation info.
 


I had an interesting occurrence, and it took long enough to figure out that I thought I'd share the cause with others, and perhaps save some hair-pulling.

It was occasioned when I discovered that one of my data (non-boot) drives was magically growing Applications and Library folders. I'd delete them, and they'd come back.

About the same time, I started to notice that the App Store was forever updating the same apps I had updated just yesterday, but I didn't connect the two events without days of turning down blind alleys.

How it began:
In an effort to clear up some space on my NVMe boot drive, I moved quite a number of seldom-used applications out of the /Applications folder and into a folder named "seldom" on my always-attached, separate storage drive, freeing up that space on my starttup/boot drive.

It was that storage drive that was growing the magic folders, but it took me a while to see the link between the two events.

It appears that some of the apps I moved from my boot drive to storage were purchased through the App Store, and despite having Spotlight turned off for storage, they were seen as needing an update.

The weirdness is that when the system did the update to the apps on storage, it also created an empty "Applications" folder and a "Library/Receipts" folder on storage, which it populated with the .boms for the updated apps.

Unfortunately, "Library/Receipts/" is deprecated, and .boms are now kept in /boot/var/db/receipts. That resulted (I'm surmising) in this secnario:
1. On startup, the macOS looks in /var/db/receipts/ and finds the original .bom from months ago for some app.​
2. That old .bom indicates that the app needs an update.​
3. The update is called, but there is no Applications folder on storage, so the app is not updated, but nonetheless, an /Applications folder and a /Library/receipts/.bom is created. That .bom is current... but is also irrelevan,t since it does not replace the older .bom on the boot drive... and the whole process repeats ad infinitum.​

Now, it could "just be me", but based on this experience, if you are seeing Applications and Library folders on drives that are not your boot drive, or you are seeing updates that never go away, perhaps you're enjoying what I experienced. Look to see if you have moved an AppStore-purchased app to that drive.

Hope this helps.

#applequality
 


I should have mentioned that I have a USB 2 Time Machine backup, and a USB 2 / FireWire SuperDuper clone.
When upgrading to a new iMac last year I also had these two choices. Used the Time Machine backup first, and subsequently had big problems with the Apple Mail accounts. Erased the SSD, made a clean reinstall and then used the SuperDuper clone and the Migration Assistant. This worked flawlessly and all Mail accounts were restored and are operating...
 


I'm replacing my aging 2009 iMac with a refurb 2019 27-incher. Does anyone have advice on the easiest way to move to the new machine? Aside from the death of 32-bit, are there any "gotchas" I should look out for? Thanks.
I just did almost the same thing in early December 2019 – moving from a 2009 Mac Pro (running El Capitan) to a 2019 iMac 27-inch. My iMac came with Mojave installed on it, but I upgraded it to Catalina a few days after the migration was complete.

I used the Apple Migration Assistant with an Ethernet cable for the migration, and it only took a couple of hours as I recall. My former Mac Pro had four internal hard drives installed, and what I did was to purchase a Thunderbolt 3 LaCie external 10TB drive and partition it the same way that I had each of the Mac Pro internal drives set up. Eventually I will consolidate all three of the "partitions" into a single partition, but my main goal with the migration was to get things set up as equivalently as I could.

My Time Machine (which uses an old 1TB LaCie FireWire drive) backup translated right over. I had to purchase a Thunderbolt 2 to Thunderbolt 3 adapter to properly connect it, but it's been seamless and has continued to work fine. My Backblaze cloud backup also translated over fine – I followed their migration instructions on their web site.

All of the passwords and such came over seamlessly in the migration.

The one sticking point, as has been well documented here, was the remaining 32-bit applications that I had on my Mac Pro. Chief among them were Adobe Photoshop CS (actually pretty much the entire CS suite) and Adobe Acrobat Pro, and perhaps a few other apps that had not been moved already to 64-bit. Oh, and Apple's iPhoto. I didn't use these apps that much (Acrobat Pro was probably the most important one, along with iPhoto).

I took the opportunity after migrating to delete all of these apps off my iMac after I migrated to Catalina, and for Acrobat Pro I examined alternatives, because I didn't want to pay huge money to Adobe for an app I use a few times a month. I settled on PDF Studio 2019 from Qoppa Software, conveniently on sale at the time I wanted to buy it, and it has been excellent thus far. I've used it about 10 times in the last month and it's worked well.

As for iPhoto, I had Apple Photos installed on my old Mac Pro but never liked it, as it was slow and seemingly buggy when it first came out. So I stuck with iPhoto until I was forced to migrate by the update to Catalina. Fortunately I can report that Catalina's "Photos" works quite well and easily imported my old iPhoto photo database without a hitch. It's much improved over the earlier versions.

Apple's "Music" app also imported my entire iTunes library (about 100 GB), and all seems to be fine with it, as well.

My recommendation is not to upgrade to Catalina until you have an exit strategy for all of your important/critical 32-bit apps. I used Catalina as a forcing function and got rid of a lot of huge, crap apps that I rarely used.

Hope this helps.
Cheers!
 


I'm replacing my aging 2009 iMac with a refurb 2019 27-incher. Does anyone have advice on the easiest way to move to the new machine? Aside from the death of 32-bit, are there any "gotchas" I should look out for? Thanks.
Assuming you have enough RAM (4 GB or more, cheap to upgrade), why not use
and try to get it to Catalina. Sure, you might not get Handoff, Sidecar, etc. Worked great on a MacBook Pro 13-inch that was otherwise stuck with High Sierra.

Make sure you follow the instructions about updating the BIOS for APFS first.
 


Following up on my previous post, I have an old MacBook (white polycarbonate) that can theoretically be updated to macOS 10.13 but is still at 10.12. If I do decide to update it at some point, where would I find a macOS 10.13 installer? I tried looking on the App Store, and there are no macOS installers prior to Catalina.
 


Following up on my previous post, I have an old MacBook (white polycarbonate) that can theoretically be updated to macOS 10.13 but is still at 10.12. If I do decide to update it at some point, where would I find a macOS 10.13 installer? I tried looking on the App Store, and there are no macOS installers prior to Catalina.
From Apple's "special" High Sierra page. Be sure to check out my FAQ before you proceed.
 


Since my last post, I decided to go ahead and upgrade my white polycarbonate MacBook 6,1. First I upgraded to High Sierra to get the latest firmware and enable booting from an APFS volume. That is the last version of macOS that is officially supported. Then I downloaded MacOS Mojave Patcher and installed Mojave. So far, so good. This is a spare computer, so if something goes wrong with the patched installation, it's no big deal.
 


Apple says Mojave is compatible for MacBook Pro circa 2012 and later. I have been skeptical about this notion for a while. My recent experience confirms my suspicions. After recently updating an early 2015 MacBook Pro directly from a fresh Sierra install, leapfrogging past High Sierra, since support for 10.13 has a short shelf life, the first thing I noticed about what I consider Mojave non-compatibility is this: When clearing up a cluttered Desktop, files, folders and other, it will pause, delay and hover over its destined folder. This behavior is somewhat reduced if the destination folder is open and in List mode.

At first I thought this might be some sort of reverse Genie effect... in Hollywood drama style of: Moving A File! I much prefer snappy folder actions. Time is wasted waiting for simple operations to resolve. In my view, this is defective Finder health – nice one, Apple – alas Mojave is at its last complete version, with the exception of security updates for a while, I think. Methinks Apple fibs regarding its system upgrades. I hate to think of the slog Catalina will produce on older systems! If I may indulge in this editorial comment, to wit: .... Sheesh!

Hmmm... it turns out this is a feature? Or behavior with respect to administrative privileges? I noticed that user accounts having standard privileges on the shared computer experience the "problem". This delayed action in Finder does not occur in user accounts having administrative privilege.
 


It is my understanding that macOS 10.14 Mojave will be supported for a while, still... a bit longer than High Sierra. So with this in mind, we updated as a test run, so to speak, a slightly older MacBook Pro to Mojave from a fresh Sierra (10.12) install.

I was quite surprised to find a list of neighbor's (presumably, and over 30 feet and structures away) Bluetooth devices populating the Bluetooth preferences pane. Needed to turn Bluetooth on in order to de-populate this list of unwanted, pesky, interlopers(?).

I admit much to be over my head with regard to a lot of IT things, especially these days....
Does this Bluetooth happenstance suggest something amiss, or sloppy with regard to macOS security?

To further editorialize... way not impressed with Mojave performance...

P.S. I see no Bluetooth preference feature, or configurable button, that will disallow recognition of stray devices
 


To update, with this and another couple of observations (disappointments with Mojave), something just did not seem quite right, so I proceeded to reinstall system software.

And because Mojave would not accommodate a Target Disk Mode install, with a little bit of consternation of having to download the latest version of Certified High Sierra... I am finding this "downgrade" a bit of a refreshing choice so far. System seems fine on the "older" Mac, although macOS 10.13 was more in keeping with the vintage of the particular computer anyway.

Feel free, anyone, to chime in on conjectures on Mojave Finder anomalies....
 


Feel free, anyone, to chime in on conjectures on Mojave Finder anomalies....
My recent Mojave install onto a mid-2012 MacBook Pro was easy-peasy (although it took a while), and once the machine calmed down a day or so later, has been just fine. For all the reasons you cite, however, I don't use Finder much. I can happily report that Path Finder 8 seems much more stable than Path Finder 7 was on Sierra.
 


Apple says Mojave is compatible for MacBook Pro circa 2012 and later. I have been skeptical about this notion for a while. My recent experience confirms my suspicions. After recently updating an early 2015 MacBook Pro directly from a fresh Sierra install, leapfrogging past High Sierra, since support for 10.13 has a short shelf life, the first thing I noticed about what I consider Mojave non-compatibility is this: When clearing up a cluttered Desktop, files, folders and other, it will pause, delay and hover over its destined folder. This behavior is somewhat reduced if the destination folder is open and in List mode.
If I understand correctly what you are trying to do, it sounds like you may need to adjust your "Spring-loading delay" setting:
  1. Open "System Preferences" from the Apple Menu.
  2. Click on the "Accessibility" preference icon.
  3. Scroll down to the "Mouse & Trackpad" icon, and click on it.
  4. Make sure that the box next to "Spring-loading delay" is checked, and then adjust the slider to your liking. If the slider is moved all the way to the left, there will be no noticeable delay between dragging an item over a folder and the folder opening. If the slider is moved to the right, it will take several seconds for the "reverse genie" effect to occur.
  5. While you are in the "Accessibility" preferences, you might consider scrolling to the "Display" accessibility preference and checking the boxes next to "Reduce motion" and "Reduce transparency." I haven't found it necessary to do that on my 2012 MacBook Pro, but that does lighten the graphics processing load.
If Mojave is not performing well on your 2015 machine, I suspect the problem is with an adjustable setting, misbehaving cache files, or something else, not with Mojave itself. There are a few articles on the Internet that share tips for improving Mojave performance, so you may want to look around and see if any of those might help.

FWIW, I upgraded several SSD-equipped 2012 MacBook Pros directly from Sierra to Mojave, and while I was frustrated by the annoying security prompts in the days after the upgrades, I found overall system performance to be excellent once the systems settled down. To me, Mojave feels roughly as snappy on those machines as Sierra.
 


If I understand correctly what you are trying to do, it sounds like you may need to adjust your "Spring-loading delay" setting...
Thanks for the comments and the refresh on the various Accessibility settings. In this particular case, I don't think the spring folder setting is at issue.

To try to clarify what I observed, and verified in the Mojave preference, is a bit difficult now, as I have reinstalled a different system at the moment. But to describe further: the process of clicking and dragging and dropping a file would result in the file hovering over the folder, while at this point the cursor has moved on, and the file would simply take a really, really long time to deposit itself in the folder, without spring-loading the folder - a process that engenders either a graphics delay... or a somewhat psychological one... as the symptom certainly kept my attention, making it hard to move on to other things.

For future: re-evaluation at some point, as High Sierra is out to pasture in November, I think. Thanks.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... the process of clicking and dragging and dropping a file would result in the file hovering over the folder, while at this point the cursor has moved on, and the file would simply take a really, really long time to deposit itself in the folder...
How many files do you have in that folder, and what types of files are they?
 


How many files do you have in that folder, and what types of files are they?
I don't think there was a file-specific relationship. Files included moving Word docs, Graphic Converter edits, and folders moved to an empty folder to collate and clean up the desktop.

Never noticed this with Sierra, or High Sierra, although... High Sierra does seem to have introduced some laggy processes in Finder and other actions like folders opening un-smoothly, or jerking/shifting into position, and choppy scrolling in Safari, which I think may be fixed with some Keyboard settings

I am sort of curious about the notion of "graphics load" and possible settings adjustments that could mitigate things to a smoother looking system operation. Sort of a truism, I guess: each system update introduces it's own odd anomalies, it seems.
 


I hit a problem upgrading a 2017 iMac to Mojave today and am wondering if other people have hit it. (Or perhaps future upgraders will find this experience educational.)

The problem was that the installer got stuck at the very beginning, after picking the volume and the progress bar first appeared. The symptom was that the GUI became completely unresponsive, the fans ramped up, and something was using 30% of the CPU (as reported by iStat Menus). The last log message was "privileged helper tool loaded". I left it running for a while but nothing changed.

Force-rebooted and tried again. Same result.

Force-rebooted, disconnected all the peripherals. Same result.

So I downloaded a fresh copy of the Mojave installer and created USB thumb-drive installer media, then rebooted from it. It got stuck at the same point, but I didn't notice it ramping up the fans. (Actually, there was one more message this time: a warning that a graphics call was deprecated.)

I left it at this point and came back two hours later to find that it had rebooted and was sleeping, waiting for me to unlock the FileVault encrypted drive. I think this means that it had just finished copying the installation files to the hard drive.

So at least in the last try, it wasn't stuck, it just appeared to be. I wonder what it was doing? The pre-boot install log file was gone, so there are no clues there.

Do you think the first install would have worked if I had left it alone for hours?

Even if the install was working correctly, this isn't a good user experience. It should be giving feedback that it is actually working.
 


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