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I bought a low-end MacBook Air a few months back to use as a travel machine, with my main machine remaining a desktop Mac Mini holding my complete files and giving me a large screen and a good keyboard.

I tried migrating selected files with key information (like log-ins), but that never worked very well, and trying to clean up the mess a few days ago resulted in a total meltdown that left me unable to boot the machine, with a first-level Apple tech online unable to overcome the problem.

She bumped me up to a second-level tech, who walked me through an erase and reinstall that involved a minimal migration and a change of user name (from my_name to my2_name). I had to re-enter Internet account names and some passwords, but some other things (like Safari settings) were migrated by sharing them through iCloud. He recommended sharing documents through iCloud or by copying them onto the MacBook Air, which so far works.

He also said that changing the user name helped avoid problems for reasons that he did not explain well. When I told him I had important files going back 30 years, he admitted that Apple's procedures weren't intended to deal with that. So far, the MacBook Air is working much better than before, including sharing files between it and the Mini, which had been somewhat problematic.

Looking back, it's clear that Apple both did a poor job of telling users what it was trying to do with Migration Assistant and did not address the many different ways in which we use our Macs. Building sharing of Safari settings into iCloud Drive is a nice trick, but I prefer Firefox, and its settings don't share. Nor do Internet Account Settings managed through System Preferences or the passwords for WiFi networks share through iCloud. (That may be because I have yet to enable Keychain sharing through iCloud, because I want to be sure how it works lest I break something.)

I find the need to change user names when you migrate between machines a nuisance. It does seem to improve file sharing, but it should be possible to design around that.
 


I tried migrating selected files with key information (like log-ins), but that never worked very well...
Using Migration Assistant to move selected files is tough, if not impossible. It sounds like your situation requires continuous synchronization of files between a laptop and a desktop, and the Apple solution for that is iCloud.
Building sharing of Safari settings into iCloud Drive is a nice trick, but I prefer Firefox, and its settings don't share.
Mozilla offers a Firefox account, which is described as "Take Your Web With You. Synchronize your bookmarks, history, tabs, passwords, add-ons, and preferences across all your devices."
Nor do Internet Account Settings managed through System Preferences or the passwords for WiFi networks share through iCloud. (That may be because I have yet to enable Keychain sharing through iCloud, because I want to be sure how it works lest I break something.)
Syncing of WiFi networks and passwords is a major feature of iCloud Keychain.
I find the need to change user names when you migrate between machines a nuisance. It does seem to improve file sharing, but it should be possible to design around that.
I have not found it necessary to change user names as I migrated from one Mac to another. They have all had the same short and long user name since I started using OS X many years ago, although I can see why it would be necessary in your case, if the procedure for solving your issue included creating a second user account.
 


In late December of 2015 I treated myself to a brand new iMac Retina 5K (27-inch 4GHz Intel Core i7 with 32 GBs RAM and 3TB Fusion Drive and 4GHz AMD Radeon R9 M395X graphics card).

This replaced my 8-year old 24-inch iMac, which was getting rather long in the tooth. One of the very first things I immediately noticed with my new iMac was how incredibly fast it booted up or restarted compared to my old machine. I was in heaven!

Now to my problem: Lately, after trying out Mojave 10.14, and discovering it killed at least two very important (to me) apps, I used OS X Recovery to erase my internal drive and use my Time Machine backup to go back to High Sierra 10.13.6. All went well... supposedly.

However, my previous super startup times have turned into a mini-nightmare! It never bothered me to have to restart my new iMac for software updates and new program installations, because I knew how fast it would restart again - no time at all! Now, however, things have slowed to a crawl! What used to take a minute or less from the chime, now takes a good 5-minutes or more. I decided to try another restore the other night to see if it would make a difference, and it took 15 to 20 minutes just to actually startup in Recovery mode alone!!!

What on earth has happened to my gloriously fast machine?? The first recovery was a Time Machine backup from before I installed Mojave, so erasing my drive should surely have erased any remnants of macOS 10.14, right?

Now even a simple restart takes 45 seconds before the chime rings in, followed by another 77 seconds before the white Apple even appears! This is followed by 182 seconds of watching the blue progress bar crawl across the screen. This used to zip across so fast before!

What has Mojave done to my incredible Mac!? Help!
 


Using Migration Assistant to move selected files is tough, if not impossible. It sounds like your situation requires continuous synchronization of files between a laptop and a desktop, and the Apple solution for that is iCloud.
Thanks for the suggestion. After seeing complaints about how easy it was to delete files accidentally from iCloud, I had been cautious about using it, but you make a good point, and I'll add that to my working plans.

Mozilla offers a Firefox account, which is described as "Take Your Web With You. Synchronize your bookmarks, history, tabs, passwords, add-ons, and preferences across all your devices."
Thanks - I had seen that "take your web with you" option when I updated Firefox, but had ignored it because I don't use a smartphone. But you're right, that's something I could use to synch a laptop with my desktop. There are so many options these days that it's easy to miss some important ones.
 


... iMac Retina 5K (27-inch 4GHz Intel Core i7 with 32 GBs RAM and 3TB Fusion Drive and 4GHz AMD Radeon R9 M395X graphics card).
... after trying out Mojave 10.14 ... I used OS X Recovery to erase my internal drive and use my Time Machine backup to go back to High Sierra 10.13.6. ... However, my previous super startup times have turned into a mini-nightmare! ... Now even a simple restart takes 45 seconds before the chime rings in, followed by another 77 seconds before the white Apple even appears! This is followed by 182 seconds of watching the blue progress bar crawl across the screen. This used to zip across so fast before!
Since you erased the file system and restored from a backup, you shouldn't have any parts of Mojave on the drive.

My guess is that it's your fusion drive (note the emphasis I added in my quote of your post). I'm guessing that the restore process didn't bother to try and figure out what files belong on the SSD part of the fusion drive and what files belong on the hard disk drive part. So you've (effectively) got files randomly scattered across both devices. In other words, you're booting from a hard drive and not from the SSD in your fusion drive.

As I understand it, macOS will optimize the fusion drive over time, moving high-priority files into the SSD part and low-priority files out. So I would like to say that your system will speed up over time as macOS builds up the statistics necessary to do this, but I don't know how long it will take for this to happen. Nor do I know any way to force it to happen faster.

Another thing to look out for: Mojave probably converted your fusion drive to APFS. It was probably HFS+ before the installation. As I understand it, fusion drives using APFS have a different allocation algorithm compared to those that use HFS+. You may want to boot your (High Sierra) recovery partition and completely wipe (e.g. remove all partitions) from the Fusion drive and re-create it as an HFS+ volume before restoring your High Sierra backup.
 


Since you erased the file system and restored from a backup, you shouldn't have any parts of Mojave on the drive.

My guess is that it's your fusion drive (note the emphasis I added in my quote of your post). I'm guessing that the restore process didn't bother to try and figure out what files belong on the SSD part of the fusion drive and what files belong on the hard disk drive part. So you've (effectively) got files randomly scattered across both devices. In other words, you're booting from a hard drive and not from the SSD in your fusion drive.

As I understand it, macOS will optimize the fusion drive over time, moving high-priority files into the SSD part and low-priority files out. So I would like to say that your system will speed up over time as macOS builds up the statistics necessary to do this, but I don't know how long it will take for this to happen. Nor do I know any way to force it to happen faster.

Another thing to look out for: Mojave probably converted your fusion drive to APFS. It was probably HFS+ before the installation. As I understand it, fusion drives using APFS have a different allocation algorithm compared to those that use HFS+. You may want to boot your (High Sierra) recovery partition and completely wipe (e.g. remove all partitions) from the Fusion drive and re-create it as an HFS+ volume before restoring your High Sierra backup.
Hello David. Many thanks for your detailed help. I was so hopeful that your suggestion might work, but, alas, after erasing my Fusion drive and reformatting it as HFS+, then restoring my drive from my Time Machine backup, I have restarted a couple of times now, and things are just as slow as before. I guess I’ll just have to learn to live with it this way. (I also reset the PRAM and pulled the plug for 30 seconds to reset the something-or-other.) But thanks so much for taking the time to offer your help! Greatly appreciated!
 


Hello David. Many thanks for your detailed help. I was so hopeful that your suggestion might work, but, alas, after erasing my Fusion drive and reformatting it as HFS+, then restoring my drive from my Time Machine backup, I have restarted a couple of times now, and things are just as slow as before. I guess I’ll just have to learn to live with it this way. (I also reset the PRAM and pulled the plug for 30 seconds to reset the something-or-other.) But thanks so much for taking the time to offer your help! Greatly appreciated!
Similar problem with my wife's 1-year-old iMac with SSD. The solution for her was to erase the drive, reinstall the OS, then migrate from Time Machine, except exclude the System and Network files from the migration. Before the migration begins, there is an option to check which files to migrate, and simple turn off the System and Network Files checkbox.

That fixed everything for her, except for her saved mail files (no idea why). I was able to find the files on another backup and import them to Mail, so she seems 100% back now.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Wrestling with migration to macOS Mojave, I'll just point out for others in the same boat that some critical security settings may be found down in... Security & Privacy > Privacy > Accessibility as well as Security & Privacy > Privacy > Full Disk Access
 


What on earth has happened to my gloriously fast machine?? The first recovery was a Time Machine backup from before I installed Mojave, so erasing my drive should surely have erased any remnants of macOS 10.14, right?
I have the same iMac as you and also suffered the first time I installed Mojave with a slow Mac, network problems and many apps not running. After pouring over the Web and deleting various old configuration files, I installed Mojave on an external drive and migrated my files across. This was a success, so having that as a fall-back position, I erased my internal Fusion drive with Disk Utility while running Mojave from the external drive and clean-installed Mojave before migrating files across. It was a complete success. Since then I've also done another iMac but used the App Store version of Mojave; again it was immediately successful.

In case you have old files causing the hiccup, I'd suggest doing an Internet search if you haven't done so already. Looking for "Mojave installation problems, network problems" and the like, as well as looking on Apple's support site, which has many links to outside advice. Also, there are many settings to tweak if you run EyeTV, Adobe CS5 and others, to get them to run in Mojave. Many can be done before installation.
 


Just a warning about a bad experience I am still recovering from. I have enjoyed owning and upgrading a 2009 Mac Pro for 9 years (including ports and the CPU itself!) - now running reliably in macOS 10.13.6. It's now obsolete, due to the Mojave requirements.

Despite careful Time Machine (TM) and Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC) backups, I was not able to use Migration Assistant to get a usable system on a new Mac Mini. I'm now re-installing everything by hand and moving files by hand where it makes sense to do so onto the Mini boot disk; most bulk storage will go onto external devices because of the exorbitant cost of Apple SSD.

Regarding the attempted automatic file migration via TM: there were about 8 tries using direct connect to the the Mac Pro system with various different details - all attempting to transfer either the whole system or all files except system files and network settings and at various times deleting those apps (files) known or suspected to be incompatible with Mojave. And, BTW, I was online with two senior Apple service techs at various points in this 3-day saga. Non-TM migrations resulted in a bricked Mini - the transfer of what should have been only data and app files somehow trashed Mojave to the point that it would not boot.

I finally, at the instruction of a senior Apple tech, switched to an attempt to use a TM backup (which, BTW, will only work if your TM backup is on an external disk that is pluggable to both the originating computer and the new computer - I had to make one because my TM backup was on an internal disk on the Mac Pro - it cost 5.5 hours to make the external TM disk).

Once that was done, I got a real surprise: TM actually reported that it was not able to use the new backup, because the computers were different models. I may be naive, but that absolutely floored me - after all, we (the Apple senior tech and I) selected to just move applications and data files and I had already deleted a bunch of known/suspected incompatible files that (BTW) had never disturbed the Mac Pro in all of its many OS upgrade through High Sierra - no system files and no network settings, no system-specific stuff, and nothing that should have tripped a model-dependency).

After that surprising failure, there were mumbled protestations from the "senior" tech about Mac OS Extended vs. APFS file systems and my use of the Nvidia graphics accelerator software on the Mac Pro (which I had removed, BTW), and "probably lots of incompatible software", but that was all in the context of the last "senior" tech saying he really did not know what was causing things to fail.

In summary, a really bad experience due to too little info on incompatibilities of Migration Assistant with some older Mac systems (apparently), the absolute requirement that TM run on an external disk, but its ability to run without warning on an internal disk, and the mysterious (at least to me and it seems to the senior tech, too) and deeply surprising incompatibility of TM backups across models of computers.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Just a warning about a bad experience I am still recovering from
I also had an amazingly bad experience trying to migrate to a new 2018 MacBook Pro, and the problems seemed to be associated mostly with Apple's own updater software, which failed on an iTunes update and failed incredibly badly on a Security Update, after having done some other updates successfully. It was all so bad, I ended up erasing the drive and installing macOS Mojave from scratch via Internet Recovery (Command-Option-R). I eventually managed to migrate about 500GB of stuff from a Carbon Copy Cloner copy of my main macOS 10.12.6 Sierra system. I had a bunch of issues with specialized utility software vs. Mojave's new security mechanisms, but things seem to be basically working OK now.

So, in my case, the main culprit seemed to be buggy Apple installer software. From your description of your problems, it sounds like you could have some issues with data integrity / hardware (or very obscure software).

One tool that has helped me with some of this stuff is Synchronize Pro X, which can compare two folders to give you a list of differences and then let you manually select which items to sync and which to leave alone (or delete). The most troublesome folders are the folders that Apple manages within the user's home directory - Library, Pictures, Music, etc., which mix up a user's own content and settings with Apple content and settings and third-party content and settings - a real PITA to sort out, especially when changing software versions.
 


Despite careful Time Machine (TM) and Carbon Copy Cloner (CCC) backups, I was not able to use Migration Assistant to get a usable system on a new Mac Mini.
...
In summary, a really bad experience due to too little info on incompatibilities of Migration Assistant with some older Mac systems (apparently), the absolute requirement that TM run on an external disk
Sorry to hear about your troubles. You can use the migration assistant on a complete system disk backup, such as a CCC bootable backup on an external disk (caveat: I have done in the past, but not with Mojave). I found this far more reliable than going from machine-to-machine (and possibly from TM).

Two other suggestions: I have also found it more reliable to first create a dummy user on the new machine, complete all updates, check/repair the boot disk and basically confirm it is stable (ideally, make a CCC backup of this stable installation, too). Only then launch Migration Assistant and migrate from the good CCC backup. (The dummy user account can be deleted later).

Also, make sure the data you are migrating fits comfortably on the new machine - which may mean deleting/excluding a CCC archive folder if you have one, as well as other non-critical filed. I don't know how well the assistant handles out-of-space issues, and wouldn't want to test it.
 


…I have also found it more reliable to first create a dummy user on the new machine, complete all updates, check/repair the boot disk and basically confirm it is stable (ideally, make a CCC backup of this stable installation, too). Only then launch Migration Assistant and migrate from the good CCC backup. (The dummy user account can be deleted later). …
This doesn't cause problems with the UID 501 vs 502 vs 503 etc. file ownership? We had some discussion about this a while back. The first user gets the 501 ID, the second 502, and so on. The imported files from a typical installation have a 501 ID. Thus, the second new user (502 ID) will not be able to access his own files which have the 501 ID from the previous computer. Have you had this problem, or did Apple fix it somehow?
 


This doesn't cause problems with the UID 501 vs 502 vs 503 etc. file ownership? ... Have you had this problem, or did Apple fix it somehow?
I didn't pay close attention to that discussion - I thought it had something to do with creating a user with the same (short?) name. I have done this, literally creating a user with a name like 'dummy' and didn't have any issues. I never even looked at the UID numbers.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
One tool that has helped me with some of this stuff is Synchronize Pro X, which can compare two folders to give you a list of differences and then let you manually select which items to sync and which to leave alone (or delete). The most troublesome folders are the folders that Apple manages within the user's home directory - Library, Pictures, Music, etc., which mix up a user's own content and settings with Apple content and settings and third-party content and settings - a real PITA to sort out, especially when changing software versions.
There's also a donationware utility, SyncTwoFolders, that seems to be a simpler app, designed to sync folders with a "simulation" mode to check on results prior to making the actual changes.

(I haven't tried out SyncTwoFolders, as I already bought Synchronize Pro X, which seems to cover all the bases, and I have some experience with it over the years.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
In case you have old files causing the hiccup, I'd suggest doing an Internet search if you haven't done so already. Looking for "Mojave installation problems, network problems" and the like, as well as looking on Apple's support site, which has many links to outside advice. Also, there are many settings to tweak if you run EyeTV, Adobe CS5 and others, to get them to run in Mojave. Many can be done before installation.
Graham Needham is trying to keep up with Mojave issues at MacStrategy, and he has a page of Mojave compatibility notes and other information worth checking before attempting a migration.
 


Over the summer I tried a couple of the Mojave betas and installed the Security Update 2018-002 on my Mac Pro 4,1 (long ago updated to the 5,1 firmware and a 6-core processor). Despite this, my Boot ROM version remained at MP51.0085.B00.

A couple of weeks ago I did a "trial run" of Mojave 10.14.1 (using a spare drive) and this time I was glad to see that my Boot ROM was updated to 140.0.0.0.0. Although the test of Mojave was largely successful, I reverted to using High Sierra for the present (using my “main" drive).

Back in High Sierra, I noticed that my next Time Machine backup was a very large one. Although I was a bit puzzled by this and marginally annoyed at the squandering of my backup drive space, I attributed it to just one of those Time Machine things.

Over the subsequent two weeks I have noticed that a couple of sites that care about such things have asserted that I am on a "unknown" computer and have asked for verification.

It now occurs to me that maybe these two things are connected. I am guessing that maybe the ROM update has made my Mac look like a "new "computer and has forced the full Time Machine backup and made me look like a stranger to web sites.

Is this expected behavior after a ROM update?
 


I got as far as the firmware update with Mojave on my cheesegrater 5,1. That's just as well, I guess! (Encrypted SSD and I don't want to de-encrypt, install, re-encrypt.)

I did get lazy on my laptop (2015 MacBook Pro), and that was a serious mistake. I should have backed up first but thought I had a recent backup. I didn't! It dated back at least three years. The update from, get this, APFS v1 to APFS v2, corrupted the startup drive beyond Disk Utility's meager repair skills.

After a while I remembered I have a USB 3 hub (duh) for the USB port on this “Pro” laptop (I have no Thunderbolt drives or adapters), and was able to boot from my cheesegrater backup, run Carbon Copy Cloner, and back up to a spare drive. It had no problems. I then reformatted the built-in drive and am now restoring. Hopefully, Mojave will run without problems.

I have to seriously warn people about getting rid of, or updating, all their software before going to Mojave. I thought everything was up to date, but apparently LittleSnitch hadn't been checking in and Malwarebytes hadn't been updating, and both are very resistant to being uninstalled unless you download the uninstaller, and that's hard to do when Mojave won't recognize any of your network ports or the USB drive!

Moral of the story: these guidelines—back up first, always; manually check that all auto-launched software is updated—are in place for a reason.
 


... Moral of the story: these guidelines—back up first, always; manually check that all auto-launched software is updated—are in place for a reason.
I have a correction to my earlier Mojave horror story. Removing all that software was no help. The problem was that I had to do this in Terminal:
Bash:
sudo rm -rf /etc/sysctl.conf
It's five lines of leftover junk. Apparently the OS kept trying to access the network and that config file brought it all to a halt. Hence insane beachballing, which I thought was from an old version of... something. It's insanely bad programming that would grind the system to a halt over and over and over, make the network and USB drive inaccessible, and bring no hint of what was going on.

Thanks to "dmauch" on the Apple discussion forums - a Level 1 poster!
 


... Two other suggestions: I have also found it more reliable to first create a dummy user on the new machine, complete all updates, check/repair the boot disk and basically confirm it is stable (ideally, make a CCC backup of this stable installation, too). Only then launch Migration Assistant and migrate from the good CCC backup. (The dummy user account can be deleted later).
Deleting that "dummy account" is probably not a good idea in the new T2 era. The initial administrator account is used in validation with security settings authentication in the recovery mode. There is a way with APFS that this account can be 'shared' across those two OS instances.

A better, more stable baseline is to create an "admin" account on each Mac. You do not migrate this one. It is always the first one (so it always gets UID 501), and you don't really keep have to keep much there. Just use it to install software for the machine—upgrades, security updates, 3rd-party updates/upgrades (that don't have some system auto update daemon), etc.

If you do this the same way each time for the same set of accounts, the UIDs on external (and shared) drives will all match up to the same consistent UID/username layout. If you put in a dummy account and move all of the accounts over from another machine, what you'll likely get is UID drift (unless the Migration Assistant has gotten smarter - I haven't tested if it has gotten smarter about matching exact UID/unsername pairs up to each other and treating them as equivalent equals).
 


In case anyone wondered about my move to Mojave on a 2015 MacBook Pro...

First, my philosophy has long been to just update each system. I've had a long string from System 4 to the present day. I get rid of old stuff now and then. My software, though, tends to be old.

I can safely say that Adobe Dreamweaver CS3 and Photoshop CS5 work perfectly and did not even require revalidation. Office 2011 and Office 2018, same story. So far, other than utilities, I haven't had any software issues yet. I will say, before you update, make sure DefaultFolder, Little Snitch, and any other startup programs are updated, and make sure you don't have /etc/sysctl.conf any more.

Second, while the first conversion to APFS worked fine, the second one to the new APFS corrupted the drive, though the effects seem to have been minimal. I did a full backup and restore, and it's fine now. I think it might be because the startup drive was encrypted originally.

Now that I know everything works with Mojave, I might just get that Mac Mini and replace my ancient Cheesegrater (which does work with Mojave!) — or I might get an NVMe card, since it's had the firmware update and can boot from the much-faster drive. Ah, decisions...
 


I’m about to migrate from a 2010 Mini running High Sierra to a fresh 2018 Mini. Everything old has been cleaned out and all apps are up to date. I made both a Time Machine backup and a Carbon Copy Cloner clone to an external drive that I will be migrating from.

I presume I boot the new Mini and create an admin account.

1. Am I better off migrating from the Time Machine backup or the Carbon Copy Cloner clone?

2. Do I not migrate the High Sierra admin account, thereby leaving the new Mojave’s admin intact and presumably at UID 501?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... 1. Am I better off migrating from the Time Machine backup or the Carbon Copy Cloner clone?
I had the same question and didn't see an answer, so I went ahead with a CCC clone that was convenient, and that worked OK, for what it's worth.
2. Do I not migrate the High Sierra admin account, thereby leaving the new Mojave’s admin intact and presumably at UID 501?
Exactly. This seems to make the most sense (though it entails doing a little preference customization from scratch on the new admin account).
 



Apple's documentation for what it's worth:
I tried to use Migration Assistant today on my new Mini, going from macOS 10.13.6 to 10.14.1. It found the old computer but would not let me proceed. The old system was set up as case-sensitive, and the new Mojave system came without that. Be nice if that catch was included in their documentation. Question: is it worth the trouble of setting up the new system to be case-sensitive, or is Apple making that a bad idea?
 


I tried the Carbon Copy Cloner clone for migration but got hung up late in the restart routine. The Mini tried again and again but froze late in the progress bar.

I also noticed a strange event where the white Apple logo on the start up screen turned green then yellow briefly. All without anti-aliasing. Very un-Apple like. I did a restore and erase and am installing Mojave now.

That Apple logo color shift troubles me most. Is it possible that it caused by my 2006 Apple Cinema Display connected via DVI to HDMI adaptor? Or some low-level system software issue. I did have a number of system extension error notices pop up during migration and just clicked through them.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I also noticed a strange event where the white Apple logo on the start up screen turned green th yellow briefly. All without anti-aliasing. Very un-Apple like.
I'm seeing the same sort of graphics anomalies during startup with Mojave, including weird yellow-green hash modes that occur briefly - and this includes just using the MacBook Pro's own display, so it's probably unrelated to your monitor or connections.
 


I tried to use Migration Assistant today on my new Mini, going from macOS 10.13.6 to 10.14.1. It found the old computer but would not let me proceed. The old system was set up as case-sensitive, and the new Mojave system came without that. Be nice if that catch was included in their documentation. Question: is it worth the trouble of setting up the new system to be case-sensitive, or is Apple making that a bad idea?
It has never been a good idea to use case-sensitive file systems with macOS unless you have a specific need for it. Mac apps (and sometimes parts of the system itself) tend to assume a case-insensitive file system and may break if installed and run from a case-sensitive file system.

My recommendation is that if you don't have a need for case sensitivity, don't enable it. If you do, enable it for a data volume, but not for the startup volume or any volume where commercial Mac apps are installed. This should minimize any breakage resulting from code interacting poorly with case sensitivity.
 


To recap:

1. Fresh 2018 Mac Mini running Mojave fails to complete migration from CCC clone on external Samsung T5. It is stuck at end of progress bar on restart.

2. Try Recovery mode with erase and install of Mojave. Create admin account. All fine.

3. Run Migration Assistant and migrate user and Applications folders. All running fine. Mail sync seems normal,

4. Copy iTunes library from Samsung T5. Try restart for the heck of it and get stuck at end of progress bar as in #1 above. Will not restart.

So today I’m going to try another boot into Recovery mode and do an erase and install of Mojave. Then I’m going to either try isolating the problem file or files by doing partial migrations with reboots in between or just go for a clean install.

Whatever is causing the problem happens at the very end of a restart when the progress bar is almost full. Even the few succesful boots during migration have slowed significantly at that point.

I’ve never done a clean install in some 15 years or more - always upgrading or migrating with old files. Maybe it’s time. With so much synced to iCloud, it shouldn’t be terrible.
 


It has never been a good idea to use case-sensitive file systems with macOS unless you have a specific need for it. Mac apps (and sometimes parts of the system itself) tend to assume a case-insensitive file system and may break if installed and run from a case-sensitive file system.

My recommendation is that if you don't have a need for case sensitivity, don't enable it. If you do, enable it for a data volume, but not for the startup volume or any volume where commercial Mac apps are installed. This should minimize any breakage resulting from code interacting poorly with case sensitivity.
Thank you. I will follow your advice. I have a lot of hand copying to do now. Reinstalling applications turns out to be more painful than expected - some companies no longer offer the version I have, and I have to buy an upgrade, and I didn't keep careful enough track of original downloaded *.dmg files.
 


Whatever is causing the problem happens at the very end of a restart when the progress bar is almost full. Even the few succesful boots during migration have slowed significantly at that point.

I’ve never done a clean install in some 15 years or more - always upgrading or migrating with old files. Maybe it’s time. With so much synced to iCloud, it shouldn’t be terrible.
2018 Mac Mini i7 512GB 8GB

Erase and clean install went just fine. It all took less time than I imagined. Having stuff synced to iCloud certainly helped. That and reinstalling apps from the App Store. The Mini is cruising along nicely. Next up install of 32MB of RAM.
 


I recently set up a 2018 13" MacBook Pro with Touch Bar. I set up the initial account exactly as I always have (for many OS updates) with the same short name, password, etc. but did not migrate anything over (or log into iCloud), as I wanted to install any updates first.

I then ran Migration Assistant and pointed it to a Carbon Copy Cloner clone attached via Thunderbolt (with a 2-to-3 adapter). The "other files" category was huge and was due to the "safety net" feature of CCC. So I unchecked that, which unfortunately did not migrate some folders on the root of the drive installed by the Cisco AnyConnect software.

Surprisingly to me, a window came up asking me if I wanted to replace the existing account of the same name or keep both. I chose replace. This left me with a home folder that had my account name with " 1" appended. This caused problems for some apps that had the original home folder set in various preferences. I was able to change this per an Apple Support document, and which required another, temporary, admin account. Anyway, a semi-smooth process.

I am still sorting out various software/preferences issues after moving from El Cap. One program that I am distressed to find not working as before is MathType in Office 2011 (haven't tried in Office 2016, but my understanding is that MathType did not work with that version even before Mojave). I had to monkey around with some font preferences to get MathType to launch without error, but I can no longer insert inline equations directly from Word or PowerPoint, nor can I double-click to edit equations. A reinstallation of MathType did not help. Anybody else using MathType under similar circumstance with more success? Switching to LaTex would not be ideal for me right now.
 


If you're having trouble with transitions, try using LaunchControl or Mojave Cache Cleaner or some other hefty startup-program manager first, to clear out any old junk that might be the problem. Old antivirus software that you thought you'd taken out might be a problem; there are others. Deactivating these startup items can resolve a lot of issues.

As a side note, I was surprised that the Mojave installer did not take out my empty Java folders that fool Adobe CS into thinking I have Java. In the past I've had to re-create these with each update.
 


Surprisingly to me, a window came up asking me if I wanted to replace the existing account of the same name or keep both. I chose replace. This left me with a home folder that had my account name with " 1" appended. This caused problems for some apps that had the original home folder set in various preferences.
FWIW, this sounds like the [problematic apps] were making an unwarranted assumption.

An app should never assume any particular location for a user's home directory. Although Apple's default is (currently) /Users/username, it could be any location. This is always going to be the case if the user's home directory is on an external or a network volume. It is also possible (but not advisable) to pick any location during account creation, even on the startup volume. Apps that assume it follows Apple's default naming convention will break if they are run from an account that puts it somewhere else. Assumptions like this may also break for apps that run in a sandbox (e.g. from the App Store), since they may run with other (sandboxed) locations in lieu of the user's actual home directory.

A macOS/iOS app that needs to know the location of a home directory should use the NSHomeDirectory (for the current/default user) or NSHomeDirectoryForUser (for other users) or one of the variant forms of these calls.

A Unix app (that doesn't use Apple's frameworks) should read the Home environment variable to determine the current user's home directory. It should call getpwnam (or one of its related functions) to get the home directory of an arbitrary user.

(Note that the old-school Unix approach of searching the /etc/passwd file should not be used. Apple does not store information about normal users in /etc/passwd, but it's bad for other Unix platforms - Unix platforms may store user data in a variety of different places, both locally and on network servers - the getpwnam family of functions knows about every location the system is using and will do the right thing.)

If an app is caching the path to a file, that should normally be OK, since home directories don't typically change. But as you figured out, if you do change a user's home directory, those cached paths will no longer be valid. Apps that want to keep working under these conditions should check to see if a file's location is under a user's home directory and cache the name of the user and the relative path from the user's home directory - it can then compose the full path when it is later used. That will let everything continue to work even when home directories are moved or renamed, but I doubt many (any?) apps are pedantic enough to do this.

Of course, a macOS/iOS app has better APIs for caching file locations. It can get a Cocoa/Swift URL object that references the file and cache that object. It would require quite a lot of work to move/rename a home directory in a way that breaks a URL object.
 


One program that I am distressed to find not working as before is MathType in Office 2011 (haven't tried in Office 2016, but my understanding is that MathType did not work with that version even before Mojave).
By now you've probably gotten the upgrade notifications for MathType; the new version should work with Office 2016. Unfortunately, Design Science sold out, and now MathType is on an annual subscription basis. I'm just using the old version (not in Mojave, though) and exporting to PDF, then pasting into Word or Pages. So, yeah, no inline equations, other than the built-in equation editor.
 


FWIW, this sounds like the [problematic apps] were making an unwarranted assumption.
FWIW the problematic app was Endnote. The saved path to the default reference library retained the modified home folder name. I just reselected the desired library in the app and that seems to have fixed it. No other issues so far that I can trace to this folder name change.
 


By now you've probably gotten the upgrade notifications for MathType; the new version should work with Office 2016. Unfortunately, Design Science sold out, and now MathType is on an annual subscription basis. I'm just using the old version (not in Mojave, though) and exporting to PDF, then pasting into Word or Pages. So, yeah, no inline equations, other than the built-in equation editor.
Yes, but, unfortunately, I have no way to bill this annual subscription fee to any account that I have access to (they don't like recurring expenses where I work). I may just have to put this on a personal credit card, but for now I did manage to get MathType working again with Office 2011. The key was checking MathType in the Sys Pref -> Security & Privacy -> Privacy -> Automation settings for Word and PowerPoint. There was also a font error, but I was able to correct that in the Style menu in MathType.
 


I am migrating from the original iPad Mini to a 6th-gen iPad (current model). The iPad Mini is at iOS 9.5 (highest possible), and the iPad is iOS 11.4. I have consistently backed up the Mini to my computer with encryption on, so everything (supposedly) gets backed up.

Immediately after a manual backup, I hooked the new iPad to the computer to restore from the backup. Everything seemed to go well, and it looked like the setup on the new iPad was fine (accounts, Apple ID, etc), but in checking, the books (PDF files, actually) in iBooks did not transfer. I found a utility, EaseUS MobiMover, that seemed to do the trick. But I was wondering if there was something I was missing in the migration.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... Immediately after a manual backup, I hooked the new iPad to the computer to restore from the backup. Everything seemed to go well, and it looked like the setup on the new iPad was fine (accounts, Apple ID, etc), but in checking, the books (PDF files, actually) in iBooks did not transfer....
I haven't any experience, really, with iBooks, but I'll just note that I've been using iMazing for backups, migrations and transfers for several years, and it has worked pretty well, so that's an option you could check out. Here's a help page:

It's apparently 50% off today, and I think you can download it and try it out before purchasing.
 


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