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... Two other suggestions: I have also found it more reliable to first create a dummy user on the new machine, complete all updates, check/repair the boot disk and basically confirm it is stable (ideally, make a CCC backup of this stable installation, too). Only then launch Migration Assistant and migrate from the good CCC backup. (The dummy user account can be deleted later).
Deleting that "dummy account" is probably not a good idea in the new T2 era. The initial administrator account is used in validation with security settings authentication in the recovery mode. There is a way with APFS that this account can be 'shared' across those two OS instances.

A better, more stable baseline is to create an "admin" account on each Mac. You do not migrate this one. It is always the first one (so it always gets UID 501), and you don't really keep have to keep much there. Just use it to install software for the machine—upgrades, security updates, 3rd-party updates/upgrades (that don't have some system auto update daemon), etc.

If you do this the same way each time for the same set of accounts, the UIDs on external (and shared) drives will all match up to the same consistent UID/username layout. If you put in a dummy account and move all of the accounts over from another machine, what you'll likely get is UID drift (unless the Migration Assistant has gotten smarter - I haven't tested if it has gotten smarter about matching exact UID/unsername pairs up to each other and treating them as equivalent equals).
 


In case anyone wondered about my move to Mojave on a 2015 MacBook Pro...

First, my philosophy has long been to just update each system. I've had a long string from System 4 to the present day. I get rid of old stuff now and then. My software, though, tends to be old.

I can safely say that Adobe Dreamweaver CS3 and Photoshop CS5 work perfectly and did not even require revalidation. Office 2011 and Office 2018, same story. So far, other than utilities, I haven't had any software issues yet. I will say, before you update, make sure DefaultFolder, Little Snitch, and any other startup programs are updated, and make sure you don't have /etc/sysctl.conf any more.

Second, while the first conversion to APFS worked fine, the second one to the new APFS corrupted the drive, though the effects seem to have been minimal. I did a full backup and restore, and it's fine now. I think it might be because the startup drive was encrypted originally.

Now that I know everything works with Mojave, I might just get that Mac Mini and replace my ancient Cheesegrater (which does work with Mojave!) — or I might get an NVMe card, since it's had the firmware update and can boot from the much-faster drive. Ah, decisions...
 


I’m about to migrate from a 2010 Mini running High Sierra to a fresh 2018 Mini. Everything old has been cleaned out and all apps are up to date. I made both a Time Machine backup and a Carbon Copy Cloner clone to an external drive that I will be migrating from.

I presume I boot the new Mini and create an admin account.

1. Am I better off migrating from the Time Machine backup or the Carbon Copy Cloner clone?

2. Do I not migrate the High Sierra admin account, thereby leaving the new Mojave’s admin intact and presumably at UID 501?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... 1. Am I better off migrating from the Time Machine backup or the Carbon Copy Cloner clone?
I had the same question and didn't see an answer, so I went ahead with a CCC clone that was convenient, and that worked OK, for what it's worth.
2. Do I not migrate the High Sierra admin account, thereby leaving the new Mojave’s admin intact and presumably at UID 501?
Exactly. This seems to make the most sense (though it entails doing a little preference customization from scratch on the new admin account).
 



Apple's documentation for what it's worth:
I tried to use Migration Assistant today on my new Mini, going from macOS 10.13.6 to 10.14.1. It found the old computer but would not let me proceed. The old system was set up as case-sensitive, and the new Mojave system came without that. Be nice if that catch was included in their documentation. Question: is it worth the trouble of setting up the new system to be case-sensitive, or is Apple making that a bad idea?
 


I tried the Carbon Copy Cloner clone for migration but got hung up late in the restart routine. The Mini tried again and again but froze late in the progress bar.

I also noticed a strange event where the white Apple logo on the start up screen turned green then yellow briefly. All without anti-aliasing. Very un-Apple like. I did a restore and erase and am installing Mojave now.

That Apple logo color shift troubles me most. Is it possible that it caused by my 2006 Apple Cinema Display connected via DVI to HDMI adaptor? Or some low-level system software issue. I did have a number of system extension error notices pop up during migration and just clicked through them.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I also noticed a strange event where the white Apple logo on the start up screen turned green th yellow briefly. All without anti-aliasing. Very un-Apple like.
I'm seeing the same sort of graphics anomalies during startup with Mojave, including weird yellow-green hash modes that occur briefly - and this includes just using the MacBook Pro's own display, so it's probably unrelated to your monitor or connections.
 


I tried to use Migration Assistant today on my new Mini, going from macOS 10.13.6 to 10.14.1. It found the old computer but would not let me proceed. The old system was set up as case-sensitive, and the new Mojave system came without that. Be nice if that catch was included in their documentation. Question: is it worth the trouble of setting up the new system to be case-sensitive, or is Apple making that a bad idea?
It has never been a good idea to use case-sensitive file systems with macOS unless you have a specific need for it. Mac apps (and sometimes parts of the system itself) tend to assume a case-insensitive file system and may break if installed and run from a case-sensitive file system.

My recommendation is that if you don't have a need for case sensitivity, don't enable it. If you do, enable it for a data volume, but not for the startup volume or any volume where commercial Mac apps are installed. This should minimize any breakage resulting from code interacting poorly with case sensitivity.
 


To recap:

1. Fresh 2018 Mac Mini running Mojave fails to complete migration from CCC clone on external Samsung T5. It is stuck at end of progress bar on restart.

2. Try Recovery mode with erase and install of Mojave. Create admin account. All fine.

3. Run Migration Assistant and migrate user and Applications folders. All running fine. Mail sync seems normal,

4. Copy iTunes library from Samsung T5. Try restart for the heck of it and get stuck at end of progress bar as in #1 above. Will not restart.

So today I’m going to try another boot into Recovery mode and do an erase and install of Mojave. Then I’m going to either try isolating the problem file or files by doing partial migrations with reboots in between or just go for a clean install.

Whatever is causing the problem happens at the very end of a restart when the progress bar is almost full. Even the few succesful boots during migration have slowed significantly at that point.

I’ve never done a clean install in some 15 years or more - always upgrading or migrating with old files. Maybe it’s time. With so much synced to iCloud, it shouldn’t be terrible.
 


It has never been a good idea to use case-sensitive file systems with macOS unless you have a specific need for it. Mac apps (and sometimes parts of the system itself) tend to assume a case-insensitive file system and may break if installed and run from a case-sensitive file system.

My recommendation is that if you don't have a need for case sensitivity, don't enable it. If you do, enable it for a data volume, but not for the startup volume or any volume where commercial Mac apps are installed. This should minimize any breakage resulting from code interacting poorly with case sensitivity.
Thank you. I will follow your advice. I have a lot of hand copying to do now. Reinstalling applications turns out to be more painful than expected - some companies no longer offer the version I have, and I have to buy an upgrade, and I didn't keep careful enough track of original downloaded *.dmg files.
 


Whatever is causing the problem happens at the very end of a restart when the progress bar is almost full. Even the few succesful boots during migration have slowed significantly at that point.

I’ve never done a clean install in some 15 years or more - always upgrading or migrating with old files. Maybe it’s time. With so much synced to iCloud, it shouldn’t be terrible.
2018 Mac Mini i7 512GB 8GB

Erase and clean install went just fine. It all took less time than I imagined. Having stuff synced to iCloud certainly helped. That and reinstalling apps from the App Store. The Mini is cruising along nicely. Next up install of 32MB of RAM.
 


I recently set up a 2018 13" MacBook Pro with Touch Bar. I set up the initial account exactly as I always have (for many OS updates) with the same short name, password, etc. but did not migrate anything over (or log into iCloud), as I wanted to install any updates first.

I then ran Migration Assistant and pointed it to a Carbon Copy Cloner clone attached via Thunderbolt (with a 2-to-3 adapter). The "other files" category was huge and was due to the "safety net" feature of CCC. So I unchecked that, which unfortunately did not migrate some folders on the root of the drive installed by the Cisco AnyConnect software.

Surprisingly to me, a window came up asking me if I wanted to replace the existing account of the same name or keep both. I chose replace. This left me with a home folder that had my account name with " 1" appended. This caused problems for some apps that had the original home folder set in various preferences. I was able to change this per an Apple Support document, and which required another, temporary, admin account. Anyway, a semi-smooth process.

I am still sorting out various software/preferences issues after moving from El Cap. One program that I am distressed to find not working as before is MathType in Office 2011 (haven't tried in Office 2016, but my understanding is that MathType did not work with that version even before Mojave). I had to monkey around with some font preferences to get MathType to launch without error, but I can no longer insert inline equations directly from Word or PowerPoint, nor can I double-click to edit equations. A reinstallation of MathType did not help. Anybody else using MathType under similar circumstance with more success? Switching to LaTex would not be ideal for me right now.
 


If you're having trouble with transitions, try using LaunchControl or Mojave Cache Cleaner or some other hefty startup-program manager first, to clear out any old junk that might be the problem. Old antivirus software that you thought you'd taken out might be a problem; there are others. Deactivating these startup items can resolve a lot of issues.

As a side note, I was surprised that the Mojave installer did not take out my empty Java folders that fool Adobe CS into thinking I have Java. In the past I've had to re-create these with each update.
 


Surprisingly to me, a window came up asking me if I wanted to replace the existing account of the same name or keep both. I chose replace. This left me with a home folder that had my account name with " 1" appended. This caused problems for some apps that had the original home folder set in various preferences.
FWIW, this sounds like the [problematic apps] were making an unwarranted assumption.

An app should never assume any particular location for a user's home directory. Although Apple's default is (currently) /Users/username, it could be any location. This is always going to be the case if the user's home directory is on an external or a network volume. It is also possible (but not advisable) to pick any location during account creation, even on the startup volume. Apps that assume it follows Apple's default naming convention will break if they are run from an account that puts it somewhere else. Assumptions like this may also break for apps that run in a sandbox (e.g. from the App Store), since they may run with other (sandboxed) locations in lieu of the user's actual home directory.

A macOS/iOS app that needs to know the location of a home directory should use the NSHomeDirectory (for the current/default user) or NSHomeDirectoryForUser (for other users) or one of the variant forms of these calls.

A Unix app (that doesn't use Apple's frameworks) should read the Home environment variable to determine the current user's home directory. It should call getpwnam (or one of its related functions) to get the home directory of an arbitrary user.

(Note that the old-school Unix approach of searching the /etc/passwd file should not be used. Apple does not store information about normal users in /etc/passwd, but it's bad for other Unix platforms - Unix platforms may store user data in a variety of different places, both locally and on network servers - the getpwnam family of functions knows about every location the system is using and will do the right thing.)

If an app is caching the path to a file, that should normally be OK, since home directories don't typically change. But as you figured out, if you do change a user's home directory, those cached paths will no longer be valid. Apps that want to keep working under these conditions should check to see if a file's location is under a user's home directory and cache the name of the user and the relative path from the user's home directory - it can then compose the full path when it is later used. That will let everything continue to work even when home directories are moved or renamed, but I doubt many (any?) apps are pedantic enough to do this.

Of course, a macOS/iOS app has better APIs for caching file locations. It can get a Cocoa/Swift URL object that references the file and cache that object. It would require quite a lot of work to move/rename a home directory in a way that breaks a URL object.
 


One program that I am distressed to find not working as before is MathType in Office 2011 (haven't tried in Office 2016, but my understanding is that MathType did not work with that version even before Mojave).
By now you've probably gotten the upgrade notifications for MathType; the new version should work with Office 2016. Unfortunately, Design Science sold out, and now MathType is on an annual subscription basis. I'm just using the old version (not in Mojave, though) and exporting to PDF, then pasting into Word or Pages. So, yeah, no inline equations, other than the built-in equation editor.
 


FWIW, this sounds like the [problematic apps] were making an unwarranted assumption.
FWIW the problematic app was Endnote. The saved path to the default reference library retained the modified home folder name. I just reselected the desired library in the app and that seems to have fixed it. No other issues so far that I can trace to this folder name change.
 


By now you've probably gotten the upgrade notifications for MathType; the new version should work with Office 2016. Unfortunately, Design Science sold out, and now MathType is on an annual subscription basis. I'm just using the old version (not in Mojave, though) and exporting to PDF, then pasting into Word or Pages. So, yeah, no inline equations, other than the built-in equation editor.
Yes, but, unfortunately, I have no way to bill this annual subscription fee to any account that I have access to (they don't like recurring expenses where I work). I may just have to put this on a personal credit card, but for now I did manage to get MathType working again with Office 2011. The key was checking MathType in the Sys Pref -> Security & Privacy -> Privacy -> Automation settings for Word and PowerPoint. There was also a font error, but I was able to correct that in the Style menu in MathType.
 


I am migrating from the original iPad Mini to a 6th-gen iPad (current model). The iPad Mini is at iOS 9.5 (highest possible), and the iPad is iOS 11.4. I have consistently backed up the Mini to my computer with encryption on, so everything (supposedly) gets backed up.

Immediately after a manual backup, I hooked the new iPad to the computer to restore from the backup. Everything seemed to go well, and it looked like the setup on the new iPad was fine (accounts, Apple ID, etc), but in checking, the books (PDF files, actually) in iBooks did not transfer. I found a utility, EaseUS MobiMover, that seemed to do the trick. But I was wondering if there was something I was missing in the migration.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... Immediately after a manual backup, I hooked the new iPad to the computer to restore from the backup. Everything seemed to go well, and it looked like the setup on the new iPad was fine (accounts, Apple ID, etc), but in checking, the books (PDF files, actually) in iBooks did not transfer....
I haven't any experience, really, with iBooks, but I'll just note that I've been using iMazing for backups, migrations and transfers for several years, and it has worked pretty well, so that's an option you could check out. Here's a help page:

It's apparently 50% off today, and I think you can download it and try it out before purchasing.
 


I haven't any experience, really, with iBooks, but I'll just note that I've been using iMazing for backups, migrations and transfers for several years, and it has worked pretty well, so that's an option you could check out. Here's a help page:
It's apparently 50% off today, and I think you can download it and try it out before purchasing.
Turns out I already have the iMazing trial. I just went out to the iMazing site to do a little research and found something interesting. It backs up virtually everything except books, music, and video! I would think those would be something a user would want to back up.

As I said, I found the utility EaseUS MobiMover, which does allow copying either i-device to Mac, Mac to i-device, or i-device to i-device. I used the device to device, and it went very quickly and correctly. I would recommend it as an addition to the backup/restore functions of iMazing.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I just went out to the iMazing site to do a little research and found something interesting. It backs up virtually everything except books, music, and video! I would think those would be something a user would want to back up.
I guess you're referring to this:
iMazing said:
Backup content
Backups do not include your iTunes Media Library (Music, iTunes U, Podcasts, Ringtones, Books and Movies synced or purchased on iTunes), so that data will not be included and should be synced separately if needed. These data is usually already synced via iTunes, Apple Music or iCloud Music Library. Have a look to our Music section to transfer these data to your computer.
That doesn't seem to be much of an issue, considering their explanation and the fact that you can also just copy that stuff using iMazing.
iMazing said:
iMazing Books
Need to transfer books or PDF files to your iPhone and iPad? Or keep a safe copy of your Books app library on your computer? With iMazing, no need to follow a complex sync process like in iTunes. You can simply drag & drop your books from the Books app to your computer and vice versa.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Interestingly, Apple maintains a migration "blacklist" here:

/System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/SystemMigration.framework/Versions/A/Resources/MigrationIncompatibleApplicationsList.plist

I found out about this on Howard Oakley's blog:

(I do a few things differently from how he's doing his migration - e.g. I don't do migrations over a network using client-server, but rather migrate from a directly attached drive.)
 


After many happy years, it's time to leave 'Snow Leopard' land. One problem: I can't. The App Store won't allow me to download El Cap (where I need to begin the journey) or Sierra (where I intend to land). My registration is fine, but it tells me there are no paid orders on file for my account. So? The upgrades are free - there's no charge for them. I still can't download them to begin the journey, though, and my research tells me I can't go as far as High Sierra, but that's okay....
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
After many happy years, it's time to leave 'Snow Leopard' land. One problem: I can't. The App Store won't allow me to download El Cap (where I need to begin the journey) or Sierra (where I intend to land). My registration is fine, but it tells me there are no paid orders on file for my account. So? The upgrades are free - there's no charge for them. I still can't download them to begin the journey, though, and my research tells me I can't go as far as High Sierra, but that's okay....
Here's an Apple article about that:
Apple Support said:
How to upgrade to OS X El Capitan
OS X El Capitan remains available for Mac computers that can't upgrade to macOS Mojave, High Sierra, or Sierra, or that need to upgrade to El Capitan first.

You can upgrade to OS X El Capitan from OS X Snow Leopard or later on any of the following Mac models. Your Mac also needs at least 2GB of memory and 8.8GB of available storage space.

MacBook introduced in late 2008 or later
MacBook Air introduced in late 2008 or later
MacBook Pro introduced in mid 2007 or later
Mac mini introduced in early 2009 or later
iMac introduced in mid 2007 or later
Mac Pro introduced in early 2008 or later
Xserve models introduced in early 2009

... use this App Store link: Get El Capitan.
 


Here's an Apple article about that:
I know this may be hard to believe, but I've already tried this approach at least five times - and I'm on the phone now (well, that's on pause for a minute) with an Apple Store tech. We're trying to figure out why I can't download the updates directly from the App Store. Every time we think we have the answer and I try to log into the App Store, the same reply comes up saying that the account doesn't exist. We've already confirmed several times that it does exist, but it doesn't according to the App Store. If it did, that would be the easiest method of obtaining the .dmg installers.

As it is, the problem isn't getting any better, and I'm unable to download the .dmg files needed to begin the upgrade from Snow Leopard. I've enquired as to the possibility that he could mail me the .dmgs on two separate DVDs, but he said those OS-es are too new and they can only do that with (I think) Lion and Mountain Lion (but it may be two others he mentioned that I'm not recalling).

... I'd love to be able to just log in to the App Store and click the 'Get' button, but when I do, it says the account used has never been used before in the App Store. It then kindly displays a button I can click to create a new account and I continue (with the Apple rep's agreement) to ignore it because the account has already been verified as created and active. I don't know why it isn't recognised and neither does the Apple rep, Chris (who has been outstanding)....
 


After many happy years, it's time to leave 'Snow Leopard' land. One problem: I can't. The App Store won't allow me to download El Cap (where I need to begin the journey) or Sierra (where I intend to land). My registration is fine, but it tells me there are no paid orders on file for my account. So? The upgrades are free - there's no charge for them. I still can't download them to begin the journey, though, and my research tells me I can't go as far as High Sierra, but that's okay....
I, too, went from Snow Leopard to El Capitan about a year ago, but had the El Capitan installer archived. I hope you can figure this mess out (installers not showing in Mac App Store).

I recently checked, and Sierra 10.12, High Sierra 10.13 and Mojave10.14 full installers were not showing up under my Apple ID in the Mac App Store (MAS) under Purchases, despite the fact I had downloaded them at the times they were released. I have those installers archived on backup external drives.

... Curiously, my Apple ID does show all earlier OS X installers Lion, Mountain Lion, Mavericks, Yosemite and El Capitan under my Apple ID/Purchases. All (but Yosemite) had actually been installed historically on the MacBook Pro internal drive and each in turn on top of the previous version.
 


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