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Some test results on my new (“refurbished”) iMac, for those who understand these things.

Feels really fast to me.

iMac Retina 5K, 27-inch, 2017, 4.2GHz Intel Core i7, 16 GB 2400 MHz DDR4, Radeon Pro 580 8 GB)

AJA System Test Lite:
Disk Write Test
Number of frames = 193​
Write rate = 397 frames/second​
Write rate = 2097 MB/second​
Minimum rate = 1893 MB/Sec​
Maximum rate = 2246 MB/Sec​
Disk Read Test
Number of frames = 193​
Write rate = 481 frames/second​
Write rate = 2541 MB/second​
Minimum rate = 1977 MB/Sec​
Maximum rate = 2827 MB/Sec​
BlackMagic Disk Speed Test:
Write rate = 2049.9 MB/sec​
Read rate = 2563.0 MB/sec​
(More details for various resolutions. Could maybe post image if anyone wants.)​
Geekbench 4.4.1
Single Core Performance
Single-Core Score 5520​
Crypto Score 3573​
Integer Score 5728​
Floating Point Score 5726​
Memory Score 5229​
Multi-Core Performance
Multi-Core Score 18888​
Crypto Score 12430​
Integer Score 23228​
Floating Point Score 22300​
Memory Score 5621​
Compute benchmarks
OpenCL Score 126165​
Sobel 309995​
Histogram Equalization 101025​
SFFT 20518​
Gaussian Blur 311754​
Face Detection 25423​
RAW 1012746​
Depth of Field 487732​
Particle Physics 25521​
#benchmarks
 


Jim's tip 1
When migrating a system which has been used for some time, install the OS fresh and migrate only user accounts. This gives the opportunity to clean up accumulated cruft and verify that you have the most recent versions of all your applications. It also forces you to rely on your documentation (software keys and support credentials, stored in 1Password) so you are ready for the next major OS change.

Jim's tip 2
It is a little late for this tip for you, but at first boot of a new macOS install, create an administrative user and do all the macOS updates. Then create/migrate the regular users. This avoids conflicts at the next major OS change.

Jim's tip 3
I don't recommend messing with the advanced options except as part of a serious corrective action. The "startup shell" setting determines the default Unix shell used for Terminal operations. Apple changes the default interactive shell at undefined intervals. For Catalina ,the default will be zsh. There are minor differences in some shell commands and parsing that can have a major influence on script behavior. Many shell scripts include a shebang (#!) first line to specify which shell to use for the script. An example would be "#! /bin/sh"

Jim's Tip 4
Before any major migration, especially to new hardware or OS, take time to make a checklist with several sections to guide your work. Apple Notes is a good to for this. Sections include something like the examples below.
  • Preparation
    • List all applications to be migrated/retained/installed new.​
    • Verify application function in new OS.​
    • Download latest application versions (where possible).​
    • Verify software license and support credentials - these should be in 1Password.​
  • Update Procedure
    • Recovery Boot​
    • Initialize boot drive​
    • Install OS​
    • First boot​
    • Apple updates​
    • Migrate users​
  • Applications
    • Reboot​
    • Install and authorize applications​
    • Dropbox​
    • 1Password​
    • All the rest​

Jim's tip 5
There is some advantage to keeping the boot volume name the same. Your experience reinforces this. A little late for you, but a good lesson for others.

Jim's tip 6
This is why we all read and participate in MacInTouch.
Thanks hugely, Jim! I actually did OK by your standards, with the exception, perhaps, Tip 2, of failing to create a "new" admin account first (I merely migrated by "old" admin account). I even made that list of software to be "deactivated" (etc.) before migrating. And that has proven an excellent tip (offered not just by you, but several others). I also didn't install a "fresh" OS, since I concluded that the machine already contained an Apple-installed "fresh" OS (Mojave).

Thanks again to everyone who helped!
 


For what it's worth, I just migrated a 2009 iMac to a new 2019 iMac. There were a few minor glitches, but I think this was due to some extra user accounts on the 2009 that had been abandoned, but the owner did not recall which ones, so we had to migrate everything; turned out there were some "Deleted" user folders and disk images. A little time and effort rectified things after the migration was complete.

But the main point of this post is to remind readers than wiping the old hard drive, installing a clean El Capitan, adding a free space partition, and installing Mint Cinnamon 19.2 (which kindly took the free space and left the small El Cap partition) resulted in a secure, 64-bit environment. If my client had not needed to stay with macOS, I would have suggested this process to him.

Mint has come a long way, and the underlying Linux software now uses Discovery to add the appropriate printer drivers (no terminal hassles required). If the needs of the owner are email and Web with some productivity (LibreOffice is already installed), this old 2009 iMac (4GB RAM, spinning hard drive!) works fine. I could upgrade the unit with an SSD, but, frankly, it works faster than I do.

I used rEFInd to add a boot-loader, then installed Mint 19.2 from a USB drive. Mint took over the boot-loader (Grub, if I recall correctly), but it still provides an option to boot back into El Capitan if there's something I have to do there.

Bottom line: unless there's a really bad hardware problem, those old iMacs can go for a decade or more.
 



The 2011 iMac glass is held on with magnets and the display with screws, not glue. I've opened three for various purposes without difficulty.
Agreed. Early 2012 iMacs and older are quite easy to open. Besides the appropriate Torx drivers, suction cups like these will help remove the cover glass. On the models without the metal frame, I've actually been able to slip my fingernails behind the glass and pry it off.
 


I used rEFInd to add a boot-loader, then installed Mint 19.2 from a USB drive. Mint took over the boot-loader (Grub, if I recall correctly), but it still provides an option to boot back into El Capitan if there's something I have to do there
The Linux-Mint 19.2 ISO images include "Boot-Repair." Having had to rescue GRUB, that could prove a very valuable tool that could be run from the LiveUSB used to create the Mint 19.2 install.

I recently needed the macOS install on my dual boot MacBook Air to diagnose WiFi problems. The hardware was working fine, but I had to connect the Mint install to the Internet via a USB > Ethernet dongle to get the drivers.

I prefer using the macOS Disk Utility (yeah, the one we complain about having features removed) to set and do any partition size adjustments.
 




Ric Ford

MacInTouch
The ones I tried to open were the original Intel white polycarbonate cases. The plastic had become brittle, the clips that were supposed to release didn't (even with a "special" plastic tool), and the plastic EMI film was thoroughly glued down.
By contrast, the first iMac G5 was wonderfully easy to access, and the way Apple destroyed that accessibility in subsequent designs was extremely disappointing to those of us familiar with the first one.
 


We used to have a shared contacts database for our office on a Snow Leopard Server. This was easy and great. This was broken by Apple a couple of OSes ago. I went through the awkward process of setting this up on an El Capitan server. This worked OK.

Now we have had to update our workstations to High Sierra, and shared contacts seems to be broken again. Machines are storing their contacts somewhere, but it certainly isn't a shared database anymore!

I am probably going to have to find another solution (after all, who in their right mind would use a Mac in a business environment these days <sarcasm>?). I am wondering whether anyone here has a solution? There doesn't seem to be anything except iOS sharing, but I may have missed something.

Our El Capitan sever is frozen in time for a few reasons, so upgrading this is a no-go and, in any case, the latest iteration of Server is not a server by any stretch of the imagination (300/364 one star reviews - wow!).
 


Mint has come a long way, and the underlying Linux software now uses Discovery to add the appropriate printer drivers (no terminal hassles required)
I've been using a 2015 Intel i5 NUC at home with Mint 18. I know I first used Mint 17 on that machine when it was new, as the NUC predates Mint 18's release. What I don't remember is whether or not I did a "clean" install of Mint 18 Cinnamon when it released June 30, 2016 or if I did an "upgrade." Mint 18.3 released November 27, 2017, and the NUC's been on that version since shortly thereafter. Since Mint 18.x is supported into 2021, I was in no rush to upgrade. But having tried the just-released Mint 19.2 on a different computer, I decided the selected new features highlighted below justified moving forward.
Linux Mint said:
New features in Linux Mint 19.2 Cinnamon
  • Update Manager -Kernel support just got better:
  • Cinnamon uses significantly less RAM than before ... changes aim to reduce input lag and make windows feel smoother and lighter.
  • The application menu is faster and it now identifies and distinguishes duplicates.
  • If you don't like overlay scrollbars or if you find them too thin, you can now configure the way they look...
  • If you find yourself always looking for the same files over and over again... just pin them.
  • XApps improvements [Pix, Xed, Xreader, more]
  • "Boot-Repair" was added to the installation ISO images. It's able to repair most boot configuration problems.
I used both Mint-provided backup programs (Timeshift, Backup Tool) in an effort to be sure my user files were safe, then followed Mint's own tutorial instructions here:
Carefully follow every step. It took a scary long time and required interim interactions and entry of the sudo password. At the end, Mint 19 was installed, and all my configurations were preserved. From there, it was a one-click upgrade to 19.2 from within the Mint software updater.

It would have been a lot faster, and probably cleaner, to do a fresh install of Mint 19.2 - but I wanted to see how the upgrade in place worked across versions.

I haven't updated my dual-boot MacBook Air, but there shouldn't be an difference in the upgrade process. your milage may vary.
 


We used to have a shared contacts database for our office on a Snow Leopard Server. This was easy and great. This was broken by Apple a couple of OSes ago. I went through the awkward process of setting this up on an El Capitan server. This worked OK. Now we have had to update our workstations to High Sierra, and shared contacts seems to be broken again. Machines are storing their contacts somewhere, but it certainly isn't a shared database anymore!
Our advertising agency still relies on one rock-solid iCloud account that allows employees access to a common set of Contacts. It works perfectly and is very reliable. Only the "Contacts" box is checked within iCloud account (well, and "Find My Mac" for the laptops). Apple Mail integrates with this constantly-updated database and auto-suggests addresses instantly during the creation of new messages. Everyone is running High Sierra.
 


I recently needed the macOS install on my dual boot MacBook Air to diagnose WiFi problems. The hardware was working fine, but I had to connect the Mint install to the Internet via a USB > Ethernet dongle to get the drivers.
Initially Mint did not support wifi on my MacBook Pro (late 2010). I think this is because the required driver is not 'open source'. I was able to select and install a working driver offline by inserting the live USB while in the Driver Manager.
 




That one disappeared quickly, but here's slam dunk II, a 512GB version of the 2017 iMac 5K system at $2209 + tax. Though it ships with macOS 10.14 Mojave, it should run macOS 10.12 Sierra and macOS 10.13 High Sierra, if you obtain a bootable installer for the earlier versions. Performance is excellent with fast internal flash storage, a 4.2GHz quad-core Intel Core i7 CPU (7th generation), an AMD Radeon 580 GPU with 8GB VRAM, and easy, inexpensive RAM upgradability (to a maximum of 64 GB).
This probably won't last very long, either.
OK, I bit on slam dunk II to bridge me forward from my mid-2011 iMac. I'll likely cut it open the moment the warranty ends to install a larger SSD.

Can someone remind me/point me to how to make a bootable Installer drive for Sierra/High Sierra for this? I have only done macOS upgrades by running an install app on an existing machine.
 


Our advertising agency still relies on one rock-solid iCloud account that allows employees access to a common set of Contacts. It works perfectly and is very reliable. Only the "Contacts" box is checked within iCloud account (well, and "Find My Mac" for the laptops). Apple Mail integrates with this constantly-updated database and auto-suggests addresses instantly during the creation of new messages. Everyone is running High Sierra.
Thanks, Scott - I think that should work for us. too. The issue appears to be that we had a pseudo-iCloud account hosted on our in-house server, and this process has been deprecated by Apple, resulting in five balkanized databases. It looks as if exporting each database and then reimporting them into a new iCloud database should work. Shame on me for not paying attention!
 



I just use DiskMaker X, and the installer download links were posted above.
I use the createinstallmedia function built into each installer. Paste the appropriate line of code into the Terminal app. This assumes the proper installer is present in the Applications folder (as it should be) and that there's either an 8GB or 16GB flash drive named "osx" present.

For Mojave:
sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ Mojave.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/osx

Assumes flash drive of 8+GB named osx is present.


For High Sierra:
sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ High\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/osx

Note: The above is shorter than what I used below, but it worked.
Note: Assumes flash drive of > 12GB named osx is present. Why does High Sierra need more space?


For Sierra:
sudo /Applications/Install\ macOS\ Sierra.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/osx --applicationpath /Applications/Install\ macOS\ Sierra.app

Paste the above into Terminal. Assumes the “Install macOS Sierra” app is located in the Applications folder and that a USB flash drive named “osx” is mounted.


For El Capitan:
sudo /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ El\ Capitan.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/osx --applicationpath /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ El\ Capitan.app


For Mavericks:
sudo /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Mavericks.app/Contents/Resources/createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/osx --applicationpath /Applications/Install\ OS\ X\ Mavericks.app


Paste the above into Terminal. Assumes the “Install OS X {whatever}” app is located in the Applications folder and that a USB flash drive named “osx” is mounted.
 


Initially Mint did not support wifi on my MacBook Pro (late 2010). I think this is because the required driver is not 'open source'. I was able to select and install a working driver offline by inserting the live USB while in the Driver Manager.
I had precisely the same experience, and it was very easy to do. I was absolutely amazed when I discovered Mint had found all five printers on the home network and added them without me doing a thing. That's easier than a Mac!
 


I use the createinstallmedia function built into each installer. Paste the appropriate line of code into the Terminal app. This assumes the proper installer is present in the Applications folder (as it should be) and that there's either an 8GB or 16GB flash drive named "osx" present.
What happens if the App Store hasn't deemed you worthy of downloading the full installer?
 


We used to have a shared contacts database for our office on a Snow Leopard Server. This was easy and great. This was broken by Apple a couple of OSes ago. I went through the awkward process of setting this up on an El Capitan server. This worked OK. Now we have had to update our workstations to High Sierra, and shared contacts seems to be broken again. Machines are storing their contacts somewhere, but it certainly isn't a shared database anymore! I am probably going to have to find another solution (after all, who in their right mind would use a Mac in a business environment these days <sarcasm>?). I am wondering whether anyone here has a solution? ...
Daylite is likely overkill for what you are looking for, but it does contacts very well and is great at sharing amongst computers.
 


What happens if the App Store hasn't deemed you worthy of downloading the full installer?
I believe Collin's "Patcher" apps will let you download the installers. You may get the various patcher apps at his website dosdude1.com

BTW, I would not use the Patcher app to create the installer USB. Collin says it's okay, but I've seen just a few strange behaviors when I use the patched installer USB on a Mac that doesn't require a patched installer.
 


I use the createinstallmedia function built into each installer. Paste the appropriate line of code into the Terminal app. This assumes the proper installer is present in the Applications folder (as it should be) and that there's either an 8GB or 16GB flash drive named "osx" present.
...
Excellent summary. I would add that almost any USB-attached drive may be used. My personal favorite is to recycle 2.5" hard disk drives from system upgrades, but I have used SSDs and 3.5" hard disk drives with equally successful results, possibly even better than USB flash drives, since most of these are somewhat slow.

And, there's more!

Partition the external drive into several volumes and create a bootable installer in each volume. I have a 2.5" hard disk drive with both High Sierra and Mojave installers bootable.

(Caveat: I have not tried this with Catalina - but it should work, since the installer only has to modify the target drive and should be unconcerned about the boot volume.)
 


... And, there's more!
Partition the external drive into several volumes and create a bootable installer in each volume. I have a 2.5" hard disk drive with both High Sierra and Mojave installers bootable.
(Caveat: I have not tried this with Catalina - but it should work, since the installer only has to modify the target drive and should be unconcerned about the boot volume.)
James, I have a 32GB flash drive partitioned into three volumes with Sierra, High Sierra, and Mojave installers. There's even room for my Office 2016 installer, Flash uninstaller, and a recent Malwarebytes installer. Depending on the situation, I might disinfect a client's machine and remove Flash before I reboot and run the appropriate installer. As we all know, doing a clean install over an existing installation (ie, Sierra over Sierra) often can clean up things unrelated to a specific user account.

I, too, have a bunch of old 2.5" spinners with four or five macOS installers and even a few "Emergency" partitions running different OS's so I can be prepared for what my clients inevitably dump on me. :D

As for Catalina, well, I'll leave that for the early adopters until it's properly debugged... maybe August of 2020.
 


I use the createinstallmedia function built into each installer. Paste the appropriate line of code into the Terminal app.
If you forget, you can run the createinstallmedia script with no parameters and it will display a list of the available options.

You may also want to read Apple's support article on the subject:
What happens if the App Store hasn't deemed you worthy of downloading the full installer?
It doesn't work. I just downloaded the High Sierra installer and got the 14MB stub. When I tried to run createinstallmedia against it, it failed:
/Applications/Install macOS High Sierra.app/Contents/Resources>sudo ./createinstallmedia --volume /Volumes/Foo

Password:
/Applications/Install macOS High Sierra.app does not appear to be a valid OS installer application.
Fortunately, there are ways to force a download of the full installer. Others here, with far more experience than I, have discussed this at length, and a web search will present many articles on the subject, so I'm not going to attempt describe the procedure here.
 


I use the createinstallmedia function built into each installer. Paste the appropriate line of code into the Terminal app. This assumes the proper installer is present in the Applications folder (as it should be) and that there's either an 8GB or 16GB flash drive named "osx" present.
Great summary! I copied it and pasted into Notes for future reference.
 


A final (perhaps/hopefully) note on my migration from an iMac 2011 to iMac 2017...

With help from iFixit and OWC's videos, and from MacInTouchers, I successfully opened my old 2011 iMac, removed my previously installed, 3-year-old 1TB SSD, and re-installed the 2011 machine's original 1TB hard disk drive, which I had retained, along with its brackets and screws. I don't mind admitting I feel quite "accomplished," having first securely erased the old hard disk drive (l-o-n-g process!), and finally installed High Sierra (the last macOS which the 2011 machine can operate) from a self-made boot/install disk.

Opening the 2011 machine turned out to be easier than I'd feared (thanks for the encouragement). iFixit was especially helpful. Swapping the drives was a piece of cake. My heart was in my throat when, after reassembling, the old machine started up flawlessly, accepted the High Sierra installation, and otherwise shows no indication of my surgery.

Next stop for the 2011: recycling by Apple. (A local non-Apple repair shop, which has been very nice to me several times, did not accept my offer of the old machine for parts. Thanks for that suggestion.) I'll wait a bit before sending it back, just in case my "new" refurbished 2017 iMac has any burps.

The rescued, now-external 1TB SSD fit comfortably in an old OWC enclosure I already had and will serve nicely as spare, lightweight external storage, at zero new cost.

I didn't bother extracting the old optical Apple "SuperDrive" (thanks for the advice). Instead, at Ric's suggestion, I bought a $26 USB optical drive from Amazon.

Thanks, again, to all who offered their experience and expertise to me over the past couple of weeks.
 


New question on migration from a Mac Pro 3,1 running OS X 10.11.6 to a new iMac running macOS 10.14.5.on a 512GB SSD drive:

The operating system on the Mac Pro is on a 256GB SSD drive and the user accounts are on another hard disk drive. I will keep the user accounts on the new iMac drive, moving Movies, Pictures, and Music onto an external SSD. Will Migration Assistant move over the users, preferences, preference panes, user Library, printers, fonts, color profiles, and application support files onto the new drive? I assume I can move them manually. If it does not move the support files, will Migration Assistant create new files?

My user name is nealnt on the Mac Pro. Would I have an opportunity to use a different name on the iMac? If so, will Migration Assistant just copy over the Mac Pro user name?

So what control do I have in Migration Assistant? Thanks.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For folks who may want an alternative to Dropbox, Mountain Duck really does a lot (including supporting Cryptomator vaults for additional security/privacy, e.g. with Dropbox, or holding passwords/license keys).

Mountain Duck is also very helpful for integrating Unix-hosted directories (e.g. on web servers) into the Finder like normal Mac volumes.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
A note from Divergent Media about Mac media compatibility:
EditReady Support said:
Missing HEVC export options
EditReady 2.1 adds support for the H.265 HEVC codec in QuickTime (.mov) output formats. HEVC is a state-of-the-art delivery codec, offering improved quality at lower data rates than H.264.

This functionality is only available on Macs running macOS 10.13 High Sierra. If you received a warning trying to output to HEVC, it is because you are running an earlier version of macOS. Users can update for free in the App Store. Please confirm your needed apps are all supported before making the transition.

HEVC is a very computationally demanding codec. The latest (2017) Macs have dedicated hardware support for HEVC. On older Macs, HEVC will be much slower to encode than other formats.
 


For folks who may want an alternative to Dropbox, Mountain Duck really does a lot (including supporting Cryptomator vaults for additional security/privacy, e.g. with Dropbox, or holding passwords/license keys). Mountain Duck is also very helpful for integrating Unix-hosted directories (e.g. on web servers) into the Finder like normal Mac volumes.
Having become irritated with Dropbox's constant requests for full disk access and frequent large updates, I swapped to using sync.com and its associated app.

However, I don't use these kind of services for sharing large files anymore, since I discovered the free, encrypted tresorit.com. Uploading a file takes a little time, as it is encrypted as it goes, but it results in a secure link that expires after a week.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Some test results on my new (“refurbished”) iMac, for those who understand these things.
Feels really fast to me.
It is quite fast for a Mac, though not as fast an an iMac Pro or latest Core i9 models for multiprocessing (and it will surely lag the $five-figure, 28-core 2019 Mac Pro in multiprocessing).

The 2017 iMac 5K flash storage performance is impressive, too (especially for large sequential transfers), and processor/memory speeds are pretty quick, especially for single-threaded tasks, with its very high (4.2GHz) clock rate.

Here are Geekbench charts for comparison:
Current iMacs can't compete in graphics performance with top PC systems (though I suppose we could attach a powerful eGPU for faster results with an external display), but the iMac 5K with Radeon 580 is notably faster than most Mac laptops or Mac Minis.
 


With the apparent final releases for Mojave before Catalina, I updated one our macOS Sierra Mac Minis to Mojave, installed the latest updates, then disabled SIP and used AppDelete to remove most of Apple's pre-installed software. If you've not read my previous posts about doing that, the core operating system works fine, possibly better, without that overhead which we don't use on our work machines.

I was confounded by one problem. The system "thought" Numbers was running and just wouldn't let me clear the related AppDelete files from Trash. I referred to the Internet for a refresher course in deleting and force-deleting the Trash, including a variety of Terminal commands I vaguely recall from prior years, but nothing worked.

I thought I'd cleaned up the problem when I did a macOS Recovery over the Internet. That went smoothly and, to my surprise, didn't even flip SIP back On but did reinstall some of the applications I'd deleted, though not Numbers.

On the boot Mac hard drive, all looked good, but when I cloned the drive to a new SSD, my nemesis files were back in the Trash. I finally was able to identify that even when the hard drive was booted, and its Trash showing empty, the clone SSD was showing the deleted files from the hard drive in the clone's Trash. Ejecting the hard drive cleared the clone's Trash.

Took a risk, used the clone's Disk Utility to erase the hard drive to empty, then used Carbon Copy Cloner from the cloned SSD to clone itself back onto the hard drive. As I shut down my systems for the night, all looks good. Tomorrow I'll use the (hopefully) good SSD clone to make duplicates in a StarTech SATA drive duplicator.
 



I was able to purchase a refurbished 2017 iMac. I followed Ric’s basic outline to wipe this iMac of Mojave and reinstall the original Sierra OS. There were a few odd experiences, but each one was remedied without much hassle.

The out-of-the-box iMac would not boot from any external USB devices until I had allowed the Apple Setup app to run first. This includes the Welcome screen and prompts us to set the default keyboard, date and time, etc. After connecting to our WiFi I had to log in to Apple with the appropriate ID (the family member that will use this Mac) and that completed the account setup process.​
Allow Sierra to install the basic OS updates for 10.12.6, reboot, etc.​
Run Sierra’s Migration Assistant and use the Time Machine USB hard disk from the old Mac.​
Turn off WiFi (just my choice to block iCloud, etc.)​
I opted to have Migration Assistant delete the newly created account and have the existing Time Machine account replace it (they’re the same name).​
The only items I selected to migrate were the named account and the applications.​
Once it completed I found the following:​
Launching Photos app brought up a Repairing… window that built / repaired the Yosemite photo library. It took about 20 minutes.​
The Calendar events were blank, even though the personal calendars were migrated and selected to view. Closing the app and rebooting seemed to resolve this.​
The migrated account would not join the WiFi network, even though the Airport Extreme base is less than 6 feet away. There was no prompt to re-enter the password. The diagnostics tool wasn’t helpful to me. I resolved this by deleting the remembered WiFi network settings and re-added it. This prompted me to enter the WiFi password again. That worked.​
After adjusting some preferences, I chose to reboot and noticed a new pop-up in the upper right that read, “Optimizing your Mac…” I don’t know what that was doing, but I clicked the Close button.​
Launching Microsoft Office 2016 resulted in a yellow bar appearing that indicated Office had to be activated by signing-in to Microsoft (I expected this). After a few mouse clicks and re-entering that family member’s Microsoft credentials, it worked.​
Mail appeared to be configured correctly but was completely empty. The Accounts preference panel showed that the Google account was offline with a red dot. I disabled it and re-enabled it and went back to the Mail app preferences, clicked around a bit without finding anything worthy of an edit (unlike earlier Mail app versions). I closed and then reopened Mail with the Account having been disabled and re-enabled, it worked and displayed the most recent messages. It downloaded all the remaining messages (several hundred) within a short time.​

A few apps needed a few nudges to work or to display the data, but this iMac appears to be just fine. Thank you, Ric, and MacInTouch contributors!
 


I want to upgrade a 27" iMac (late 2013) running High Sierra 10.13.6 to Mojave.
My startup disk is an external Samsung T5 SSD using HFS+ connected by USB.

Will the App Store Mojave upgrade procedure automatically convert the SSD from HFS+ to APFS (over a USB connection)? If not, can I convert it to APFS after Mojave is installed as HFS+, so that I can install future system updates?

Could I take another route and use SuperDuper to clone the current HFS+ startup disk to an HFS+ hard drive and then copy the clone to an empty T5 that is already formatted as APFS?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Will the App Store Mojave upgrade procedure automatically convert the SSD from HFS+ to APFS (over a USB connection)?
Here's what Apple says:
Apple Support said:
How to erase a disk for Mac
... If you need to erase your disk before installing High Sierra or later for the first time on that disk, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled). During installation, the macOS installer decides whether to automatically convert to APFS—without erasing your files:
  • macOS Mojave: The installer converts from Mac OS Extended to APFS.
  • macOS High Sierra: The installer converts from Mac OS Extended to APFS only if the volume is on an SSD or other all-flash storage device. Fusion Drives and traditional hard disk drives (HDDs) aren't converted.
 


Here's what Apple says:
Apple Support said:
How to erase a disk for Mac
... If you need to erase your disk before installing High Sierra or later for the first time on that disk, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled). During installation, the macOS installer decides whether to automatically convert to APFS—without erasing your files:
  • macOS Mojave: The installer converts from Mac OS Extended to APFS.
  • macOS High Sierra: The installer converts from Mac OS Extended to APFS only if the volume is on an SSD or other all-flash storage device. Fusion Drives and traditional hard disk drives (HDDs) aren't converted.
The Mac support page may be incomplete. When I moved to High Sierra on an external SSD, the installer did not convert the SSD to APFS. At that time, other users also reported that only internal SSDs were converted. That's why I asked the question about moving from High Sierra to Mojave. Has the behaviour changed? When moving to Mojave, does the installer convert external SSDs from HFS+ to APFS?
 


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