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I'm not sure if this is the correct place in the forums, but I have a question after upgrading my OS to El Capitan. What I am looking for is a way to move all the network locations that were available on my old system (Mavericks) to the new system. The upgrade was done 'in place', i.e., I installed El Capitan over Mavericks. When I looked at the available networks, the only location that was shown was "Automatic" I had some other configurations that optimized DNS for where I was located. But those are all gone.

I presume that they are stored in a preference file somewhere, but I have been unable to figure out what that is. I still have a clone of the old system and could extract that preference file if I could figure out which one it is. Has anyone tried this and, if so, what is the best way to move these network locations?
 



Looking in 10.8.5 and 10.12.5 Macs, they are in
/Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/preferences.plist
Thank you Simon. I was looking in my user library. Of course, network settings are universal.

After a reboot (not surprised that I needed to do that), the networks are all there. My only question at this time is why did Apple blow them away? The .plist file was all that I needed to move, and it is directly from the older system.
 


I have a problem with macOS Sierra on my 2011 MacBook Pro 17" (2.5 GHz). I have a modeling program that runs about ½ speed compared to another mostly equivalent 15" 2011 MacBook Pro (2.0 GHz) without much installed on it. I finally decided I need to do a clean install on a spare machine and start moving stuff over piecemeal to try figuring out the problem.

In the process, I ran into a couple nasty surprises:

It is impossible to fully transfer the keychains. Keychain Access shows two keychains: login and local items. Copying ~/Library/Keychains worked for the login keychain; the local items keychain did not.

The method used to copy the keychain doesn't matter - Carbon Copy Cloner, Time Machine backup/restore, Migration Assistant, whatever. It won't be used if it isn't on the original machine.

Apparently Apple builds in some sort of UUID test, and if it isn't on the original machine where it was created, it can't be used. Apple apps, such as Safari, use the local items keychain, while most everything else seems to use the login keychain. Apple expects us to use iCloud to synchronize local items. I've never used iCloud, so...

I signed in, selected to synchronize only the keychain. In keychain access, "local items" became "iCloud", so I assume the keychain was successfully pushed into the cloud. I signed into iCloud on the spare, and it appeared to successfully pull the keychain down. I signed out of iCloud on both machines, and when prompted chose to keep the keychains rather than delete them.

I thought all was well, then I discovered Safari only recognized some of the passwords. I have no idea how many are missing, but the local items keychain on the spare only has some of my passwords. So fail #1.

When I turned on iCloud, even though I selected to synchronize only the keychain, it demanded I set up other accounts, which I canceled. This may have contributed to my next problem.

I tried to transfer my mail over to the spare. I'm still using Apple Mail (yes, a mistake). In older versions, copying ~/Library/Mail successfully transferred my account settings and mail database. No more. When starting Mail on the spare, It came up as if it had never been run and wanted me to set up from scratch.

The account settings have been moved into System Preferences > Internet Accounts. I could not find where the settings are actually stored, so I tried recreating the accounts on the spare. It still won't use my mail database I copied over. Fail #2.

I'm investigating abandoning Safari for Firefox. Firefox keeps everything - bookmarks, settings, passwords, etc. in a single directory, which can be copied to a new machine and work just like the original. I think Chrome does, also.

I'm also investigating replacing Mail with Airmail. This will be a pain, as it looks like it won't import my settings. I have a lot of rules for sorting my mail into many different folders, and a huge mail database going back years.

My conclusion: Apple's apps are too closely married to the OS. Recovery is far more difficult now than in previous Mac OS X versions. Thanks, Apple.
 


... I tried to transfer my mail over to the spare. I'm still using Apple Mail (yes, a mistake). In older versions, copying ~/Library/Mail successfully transferred my account settings and mail database. No more. When starting Mail on the spare, It came up as if it had never been run and wanted me to set up from scratch. The account settings have been moved into System Preferences > Internet Accounts. I could not find where the settings are actually stored, so I tried recreating the accounts on the spare. It still won't use my mail database I copied over. Fail #2.
...
My conclusion: Apple's apps are too closely married to the OS. Recovery is far more difficult now than in previous Mac OS X versions. Thanks, Apple.
  • Apple Mail, especially on OS X, has been problematic in some versions.
  • Apple Mail, especially on macOS, has been quite good for many users.
  • Apple Mail, for many versions of OS X and macOS, has become entwined with iCloud and Mail on iOS. Trying to transfer messages or rules using file copy has long been almost guaranteed of failure.
  • Since Apple Mail has become entwined with iCloud and Mail on iOS, Migration Assistant has had good success probability. Just not always perfect.
  • Long ago it became obvious that an intermediate IMAP server was the best medium for wholesale transfers of messages between instances of Mail User Agents (MUAs) or Servers (MTAs), including Apple Mail and Microsoft Outlook. I actually created my own local IMAP server for this before iCloud was born to use as a migration tool from the Windows world.
  • Recently, I have used an iCloud account with sufficient storage as an intermediate server for non-iCloud email accounts. This works for both local and account mail folders.
    • Create a new iCloud folder
    • Drag whatever folders need to be transferred to that folder
    • Wait a long time.
    • On the target machine, drag the folders to you desired locations.
    • Clean up appropriately.
  • The bottom line for this is that IMAP accounts do not require any manual transfer processes for messages and can be used as intermediates for transferring On My Mac mailboxes.
I would rather say that many macOS applications are too closely married to iCloud (containers, anyone?), and this can make recovery sometimes difficult. Recently, Apple has been slowly adding recovery capabilities to iCloud on the web.

As an aside, my personal macOS Apple Mail has one iCloud account, one mail.com account, two Gmail accounts, and two comcast.net accounts. This fluctuates as additional accounts are added for test purposes, as in verification and diagnosis of a client's email problems. The base set has survived intact through many OS X and macOS in-place updates, migration to new OS X and macOS instances. Since they are IMAP-based, even activating one or more mail accounts on older macOS versions (Snow Leopard Server, Sierra, and High Sierra) is relatively simple.

I use iCloud Safari to synchronize bookmarks plus a third party to copy these to Firefox. I refuse to share macOS keychains in iCloud. And, I keep lots of stuff in 1Password (in AgilbitsCloud) and Dropbox.

Time Machine and Carbon Copy Cloner are my go-to backup and restore applications.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch


In fact, Emailchemy has one built in for just that purpose.
To my best recollection, I made the Outlook to Apple Mail migration after I had been disconnected from the Outlook server. Emailchemy was just being born then, and the IMAP server software was free. I connected my Windows XP laptop to the server, let it sync, and then connected Apple Mail to the server. Magic happened.

Since then, but thankfully not recently, I have repaired several clients' problems with Apple Mail, including working around the "truth" of iCloud contents, which insisted that all mailboxes (or in some cases, calendars) were empty and promptly discarded local Time Machine restores. Those were "fun" times.
 


I was able to get the 'On My Mac' Mail folders imported into Airmail. However, I still haven't figured out how to get the Mail inbox contents to transfer.

In Airmail, I created a 'local account', then in the local account settings selected 'Load Messages' and then selected ~/Library/Mail/V4. This imported from On My Mac, but not the inboxes.

Can Emailchemy get my inboxes into Airmail? I use POP, not IMAP.

Apparently there is no way to import filter rules, I will have to recreate those from scratch.

I'm not convinced that Airmail will solve the desire for the ability to transplant the setup to a second machine by simply copying the folder. It is sandboxed, the database is in ~/Library/Group Containers/2E337YPCZY.airmail. I have my doubts that it can just be copied and work.

I still haven't figured out how to transplant my local items keychain. In Keychain Access, File -> Export Items is always disabled.
 



  • Since they are IMAP-based, even activating one or more mail accounts on older macOS versions (Snow Leopard Server, Sierra, and High Sierra) is relatively simple.
I have experienced an oddity. Using Emailchemy and its built-in IMAP server, I wanted to import my mail from Yosemite Apple Mail into its Mojave counterpart.

Things appeared to go smoothly, except that I noticed some folders contained emails with incorrect "Date Received" values...some messages claiming to be dated well into the 2030s... others "merely" claiming to be from November 2019.

Emailing Weird Kid Software support, they informed me that "Date Received" is a calculated value and that Apple Mail merely guesses, sometimes incorrectly. They told me to use "Date Sent", which is indeed accurate for sorting purposes. But even if I display "Date Sent", the incorrect "Received" date is still the only one that prints out if I print a copy of the message.

I'm confused. If nothing happened to my data files, where has this discrepancy come from, since Yosemite Mail never did this?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I have experienced an oddity. Using Emailchemy and its built-in IMAP server, I wanted to import my mail from Yosemite Apple Mail into its Mojave counterpart. Things appeared to go smoothly, except that I noticed some folders contained emails with incorrect "Date Received" values...some messages claiming to be dated well into the 2030s...
For what it's worth, I also have a few messages imported from Eudora by Emailchemy into Postbox/Thunderbird that are munged with incorrect dates in the summary display, e.g. "7/12/44" with a header like this:
From - Wed Dec 31 00:00:00 0002
Subject:
From: all
Date: Wed, 31 Dec 0002 00:00:00 -0500

Fortunately, it seems to be only a few, but it's not clear what caused the problem. I never tried to figure it out, since it didn't seem to affect too many messages, and I kept my Eudora archives (I think!).
 


For what it's worth, I also have a few messages imported from Eudora by Emailchemy into Postbox/Thunderbird that are munged with incorrect dates in the summary display...
Thanks, Ric! That has saved me some time. It confirms that the IMAP server feature was not a factor. While I am glad to have bought a license, I think I will investigate importing my Apple Mail without an intermediary program, since, in theory, it needs no conversion, because I am not changing programs.
 


I have a friend running a 2010 iMac on Yosemite and a 2011 MacBook Pro on Sierra - and he's asking me if upgrading both to High Sierra would be possible.

I can't see why not, but locating a copy of the full installer application is proving very difficult - does anyone have any suggestions as to where I/he can obtain this, please?

Thanks.
 



After many years, I finally got around to upgrading my Mac Mini Server from El Capitan (OS X 10.11) to Sierra (macOS 10.12). (I won't install High Sierra, because everything I've read says that it creates more problems than it solves, and Mojave isn't compatible with a 2011 Mac Mini.)

The upgrade was mostly painless, but not entirely. Here's a quick summary of the experience.
  • Before starting, I made two full bootable backups (via Carbon Copy Cloner) and made sure Time Machine had a chance to complete a backup or two.
  • There was no problem downloading the Sierra installer via Apple's How to upgrade to macOS Sierra page. The iTunes link to the Sierra installer worked fine.
  • The installer notified me that it would be stopping Server and that I would need to restart it after the upgrade. This pretty much shut down my home LAN, since the Mac is providing my DHCP and DNS services. I could've activated these services on my router, but I didn't bother, because the rest of the family was out for the day and I was willing to put up with it. (The downside is that I couldn't stream anything on my TV until after the upgrade was complete.)
  • The installer took longer than expected. Well, longer than I would've expected, had I not read plenty of stories about long upgrades. The installer said "33 minutes remaining" for well over 45 minutes. And then it said "15 minutes remaining" for another 30 minutes. Rather than stare at the screen making myself nervous, I went into the family room and watched TV shows for a few hours.
  • After the installation, I was notified that the Gutenprint drivers I had previously installed (version 5.2.7) were not compatible. The package was moved to an "Incompatible software" folder. I didn't bother trying to find/install a newer version, because my current printer doesn't need Gutenprint drivers.
  • After the installation, Server was not running, as I was warned. I launched Server, which promptly downloaded updates to itself and re-activated its services (I'm running file sharing, web server, DNS and DHCP).
  • Although DNS was working and didn't require reconfiguration, the local network settings were changed to remove 127.0.0.1 from the DNS settings, so I couldn't resolve my LAN addresses until I put it back. Then it worked fine.
  • The web server was restarted, but Apple turned off the "userdir" feature in the Apache configuration file (so /Users/username/Sites/... is published as ~username/... by the web server).

    I had to manually edit /Library/Server/Web/Config/apache2/httpd_server_app.conf and uncomment two lines:
    Code:
    LoadModule userdir_module libexec/apache2/mod_userdir.so
    and
    Code:
    Include /private/etc/apache2/extra/httpd-userdir.conf
    in order to get the feature up and running again.
  • There were, of course, additional updates to install - a few apps and a security update.
  • I upgraded Carbon Copy Cloner to version 5 after upgrading macOS. I see now that version 4 is compatible with Sierra, although I thought it wasn't (maybe support was added at some point and I didn't notice). The upgrade process was surprisingly painless. I went to the purchase upgrade page, entered my old registration code, qualified for the discount and purcahsed the upgrade. Although I received an e-mail with the new registration code, it appears to have been unnecessary - I downloaded and installed version 5, and it auto-detected the new license as soon as I launched it. (I assume it phoned home with my name and e-mail address credentials to get this.)
  • Microsoft Office upgraded, but it was weird. I first ran Auto Update directly (I've had it as a Dock icon for many years), but it didn't find anything to update. Then I launched Excel (I assume any app would've worked) and got a screen telling me that I should upgrade. I then quit Excel and re-launched Auto Update, and it found all the installers for version 16.24 (Office 2019 equivalent). They took a while to download and install, and the first launch took a long time, but they seem to be working fine now.
  • The App Store's Updates tab listed Xcode as being incompatible with macOS 10.12, but when I went to the Xcode product page and clicked Update, it asked if I wanted to download and install the most recent compatible version. I said yes, and the upgrade installed.
  • FileMaker Pro 11 seems to still be working (at least for the basic set of features I use), even though it's definitely not supported on this version of macOS.
  • Photoshop Elements 10 (also not supported on this version of macOS) still works, as does my Silverfast 8 scanner software (which is supported) and the plugin to integrate the two. Interestingly, Elements no longer crashes when I quit it, as it had been doing ever since I upgraded the Mac to OS X 10.11, which is happy bonus.
So my Mini Server is now upgraded and seems to be working great. I may be the last person left to perform this upgrade, but just in case I'm not, the above may be of some help to the next person.
 


So my Mini Server is now upgraded and seems to be working great. I may be the last person left to perform this upgrade, but just in case I'm not, the above may be of some help to the next person.
I reply because David is not the only one. I've been moving from OS X 10.8.5 to macOS 10.12.6 on a classic Mac Pro (Mid 2010) since 2019-04-20 (six days ago).

My experience is similar and relatively smooth. Local wrinkles include migrating users by keeping symlinks on boot disk to home directories on a separate disk (not using Apple's migration tools1), keeping Office 2011 (moving license file from backup to new OS disk worked).

Setting up a local web server on macOS 10.12 "Sierra" (found via web search) helped me re-set up local web server quickly (details similar to David's). All this went (surprisingly) well.

Took the Homebrew plunge, after reviewing it for months and getting comfortable with package-installs on a Debian server. Up to this point, I doggedly did the manual download-configure-compile-install dance. Homebrew is a nice respite and well-stocked2.

Had a hiccup with SSH keys and the Mac keychain, solved with

Code:
sudo trimforce enable
('nuff said.)

Currently wrestling with AppleScripts and Keyboard Maestro macros that got borked by changes to iTunes, among other applications.

I don't love iTunes enough to worry much about its changes as a music player, but still… iTunes 11.4 in old setup, iTunes 12.8.2 in new, then downgraded to iTunes 12.6.5 – hooray for backups and the Previous iTunes Libraries folder.

Still to do: deal with local backups of various iOS devices of various vintages and widely-varying iOS versions.

1Not that I distrust Apple's tools. This seemed the path of least effort. So far, so good.
2RCS no longer in Apple command line tools?
Code:
brew install rcs
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I've been moving from OS X 10.8.5 to macOS 10.12.6 on a classic Mac Pro (Mid 2010) since 2019-04-20 (six days ago). My experience is similar and relatively smooth. Local wrinkles include migrating users by keeping symlinks on boot disk to home directories on a separate disk...
I like the idea of linking big personal directories to separate drives/volumes for many reasons, but it seems problematic to me because Apple manages certain files and folders within your "personal" home directory, and Apple's constant changes create compatibility problems (e.g. with iTunes), such that I'm afraid that two different OS X/macOS versions using the same user folder could conflict and screw up personal preferences or data.
 


I like the idea of linking big personal directories to separate drives/volumes for many reasons, but it seems problematic to me because Apple manages certain files and folders within your "personal" home directory, and Apple's constant changes create compatibility problems (e.g. with iTunes), such that I'm afraid that two different OS X/macOS versions using the same user folder could conflict and screw up personal preferences or data.
This is a legitimate concern, which I share. My method includes never booting from the prior OS with the symlinked home directories used with the newer OS, whose Library files may have been made incompatible by the new OS and upgraded applications1.

I also have a complete bootable backup with the old OS and home directories on a single volume. The main reason for the OS/symlink-homes split is a holdover from “SSDs are expensive2, so buy a smaller-cheaper one for the OS.”

With backups galore, I am willing to risk that old-OS settings won't break new-OS stuff. For example, I noted that Terminal Profiles seem to have transitioned without problems.

I will not delete the old-OS backup for a very long time. It's nice that disk is cheap and only gets cheaper over time. (I still have a home/Library directory backup from a 2014 upgrade!)

1That said, my experience indicates that Mac preferences and settings files (usually plists) tend to be robust across version changes.
2Things change: prices are dropping precipitously.
 


…my experience indicates that Mac preferences and settings files (usually plists) tend to be robust across version changes.
But, I am wrestling with an Excel preference issue: in spite of my setting the date format to yyyy-mm-dd in System Preferences > Language & Region > Advanced > Dates > Short, Excel defaults dates to yy-mm-dd. My prior setup defaulted to the preferred yyyy-mm-dd. I've fiddled with Excel Preferences > Edit date-related stuff with no joy. Can anyone help with this?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This is a legitimate concern, which I share. My method includes never booting from the prior OS with the symlinked home directories used with the newer OS, whose Library files may have been made incompatible by the new OS and upgraded applications
So, the issue I have is: How do you work on a new system (e.g. Mojave), making changes all the time, and then seamlessly switch back to the old system, after finding a problem, without losing your work and changes?

Here's the critical potential problem: The new macOS needs a different app version from the earlier OS X, and its file formats have changed, so the new files don't work with the old app, and the new app doesn't work on the old system. (This applies to both Apple and third-party apps.)

In addition, any changes to Apple-managed preferences in the new system will be lost in a switch back to the old system. Other preference files (Apple and third-party) may be incompatible between OS versions.

There are probably additional issues that I'm not thinking of, at the moment. I suppose Spotlight indexes, Time Machine backups, disk formats (APFS vs. HFS+), security issues (e.g. FileVault support), drivers (e.g. Mac Pro graphics), 32-bit compatibility (e.g. QuickTime files), and other things could all be problematic in switching back and forth.

But it's user documents and data (including preferences) that seem most critical, as far as not losing work.
 


After many years, I finally got around to upgrading my Mac Mini Server from El Capitan (OS X 10.11) to Sierra (macOS 10.12). (I won't install High Sierra, because everything I've read says that it creates more problems than it solves, and Mojave isn't compatible with a 2011 Mac Mini.) The upgrade was mostly painless, but not entirely. Here's a quick summary of the experience...
This week, I noticed another issue after the upgrade. My color calibration profile got deselected.

For the first few days, I noticed that everything looked washed out - far more than the usual gray-on-gray Apple UI. I opened up the Displays system setting and went to the Color tab. The screen immediately loaded my profile (that I created several years ago). I then selected a different profile (which looked terrible) and then re-selected mine, just in case doing so was necessary to re-write whatever internal file the system uses to load the calibration at startup.

The settings seem to have stuck now, so hopefully the problem won't return again.
 


A few questions about migrating from a 2011 iMac to a much more "current" 2017 iMac — I'd welcome suggestions from the MacInTouch crowd:

1. Aside from multiple, complete backups (of course), would you recommend I turn Off “FileVault” encryption before “migrating” from my old iMac to the new one (and then re-enabling FileVault on the new machine)?

2. Would you recommend wiping the new machine clean before doing anything, then installing fresh system software and only then “migrating?” Or “migrate" first, then update system software? (I don’t know yet which system will come installed on the new machine, but I probably will want to put Mojave on it.)

3. Any other hot tips for “migration” like this, from a High Sierra machine to a Mojave machine?

4. I wish I could dismantle-and-reuse the optical drive from the old (2011) machine for installation in an external enclosure. Should I just dismantle the old iMac (following the OWC video instructions) and forget about re-closing the machine before disposal/recycling? If I did that, I could save the 1TB internal SSD, also. Or do you think I should just “dispose”/recycle the old machine and not try to "rescue" any of its parts?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
1. Aside from multiple, complete backups (of course), would you recommend I turn Off “FileVault” encryption before “migrating” from my old iMac to the new one (and then re-enabling FileVault on the new machine)?
Bombich (Carbon Copy Cloner) recommends disabling FileVault to avoid problems then reenabling it. However, I really don't like having unencrypted data (e.g. passwords and financial account data) hanging around, and I don't like waiting days for encryption to complete, so I generally format the drive as FileVault-encrypted before I install anything. Both should work. (APFS is different from HFS+, and T2 is different from non-T2. With T2, you don't have to wait days for decryption/encryption to complete.)
2. Would you recommend wiping the new machine clean before doing anything, then installing fresh system software and only then “migrating?” Or “migrate" first, then update system software? (I don’t know yet which system will come installed on the new machine, but I probably will want to put Mojave on it.)
I always certify a new drive (via SoftRAID), which wipes the drive, then format, install, and finally migrate (via Migration Assitant). But cloning your existing system first (if it's compatible/bootable), then updating via App Store may work better, if your current system is in good shape. The 2017 iMac should arrive with Mojave on it, but it may not have the latest updates, so installing those is the first thing I'd do before migrating, if you're not starting with a clone.
3. Any other hot tips for “migration” like this, from a High Sierra machine to a Mojave machine?
I'd suggest having some dedicated folder - on a spare drive or Dropbox or whatever, to log things as you go. Lots of screenshots, etc. Expect to have to deal with new security configuration issues in Mojave, as well as needing some app updates.
4. I wish I could dismantle-and-reuse the optical drive from the old (2011) machine for installation in an external enclosure. Should I just dismantle the old iMac (following the OWC video instructions) and forget about re-closing the machine before disposal/recycling? If I did that, I could save the 1TB internal SSD, also. Or do you think I should just “dispose”/recycle the old machine and not try to "rescue" any of its parts?
You can buy a tiny little USB optical drive for very little money (or more money, if you buy it from Apple). I doubt it's worth fooling around with an old, and probably dusty/dirty, SuperDrive, unless I'm missing something.

The one thing I'd do before any recycling is to very thoroughly wipe any drive you're recycling. SoftRAID is good for that (Certify), and there are other options if needed.
 


A few questions about migrating from a 2011 iMac to a much more "current" 2017 iMac...
I don't know what reason there would be to turn off FileVault on the old machine before doing a file-based migration. In theory, it would be more secure to turn FileVault on the new machine before migrating, but that's not feasible if you're doing a first-boot migration.

First-boot migration is best, because your user account can transfer with the same UID (assuming that your account on the old machine was also the first account created).

A cleaner migration is if both the source and target are at the same macOS release. It may work to migrate to a higher release; it did for me going from Sierra to High Sierra, but Apple doesn't recommend that. So, if the new machine comes with High Sierra, the way to do it would be a first-boot migration to High Sierra, then an in-place upgrade to Mojave.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
In theory, it would be more secure to turn FileVault on the new machine before migrating, but that's not feasible if you're doing a first-boot migration.
In this case, with no T2 involved, it may be possible, if not particularly easy.
  1. Boot from an external drive.
  2. Clone the virgin internal drive to an external drive.
  3. Optionally, certify the internal drive.
  4. Reformat the internal drive with encryption.
  5. Clone back the virgin system to the now-encrypted internal drive.
  6. Reboot from the now-encrypted internal drive and proceed through "first" boot migration.
 



I'm running El Capitan 10.11.6 on a Late 2009 Mac Mini 3,1 and I keep getting nag messages to upgrade to Mojave. I'd love to, Apple, but gee, you didn't choose to support Mojave on my "vintage" Mac (which can natively run the latest distros of Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Elementary and even Windows 10 just fine, thanks).

Is there any way to turn off these nag messages? I mean, other than using dosdude's patch to install Mojave.
 


I'm running El Capitan 10.11.6 on a Late 2009 Mac Mini 3,1 and I keep getting nag messages to upgrade to Mojave. I'd love to, Apple, but gee, you didn't choose to support Mojave on my "vintage" Mac (which can natively run the latest distros of Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Elementary and even Windows 10 just fine, thanks). Is there any way to turn off these nag messages? I mean, other than using dosdude's patch to install Mojave.
They nagged me for over a year (and are still) to update to printer drivers that weren't as new as the ones I installed from the printer manufacturers. Nagged me to enable Siri, when my system doesn't have a microphone, Facebook, when it doesn't have a camera, but the processes are running and trying to phone home anyway. By the way, it gets much worse in macOS 10.14.6. Good luck.
 


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