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I'm replacing my aging 2009 iMac with a refurb 2019 27-incher. Does anyone have advice on the easiest way to move to the new machine? Aside from the death of 32-bit, are there any "gotchas" I should look out for? Thanks.
Assuming you have enough RAM (4 GB or more, cheap to upgrade), why not use
and try to get it to Catalina. Sure, you might not get Handoff, Sidecar, etc. Worked great on a MacBook Pro 13-inch that was otherwise stuck with High Sierra.

Make sure you follow the instructions about updating the BIOS for APFS first.
 


Following up on my previous post, I have an old MacBook (white polycarbonate) that can theoretically be updated to macOS 10.13 but is still at 10.12. If I do decide to update it at some point, where would I find a macOS 10.13 installer? I tried looking on the App Store, and there are no macOS installers prior to Catalina.
 


Following up on my previous post, I have an old MacBook (white polycarbonate) that can theoretically be updated to macOS 10.13 but is still at 10.12. If I do decide to update it at some point, where would I find a macOS 10.13 installer? I tried looking on the App Store, and there are no macOS installers prior to Catalina.
From Apple's "special" High Sierra page. Be sure to check out my FAQ before you proceed.
 


Since my last post, I decided to go ahead and upgrade my white polycarbonate MacBook 6,1. First I upgraded to High Sierra to get the latest firmware and enable booting from an APFS volume. That is the last version of macOS that is officially supported. Then I downloaded MacOS Mojave Patcher and installed Mojave. So far, so good. This is a spare computer, so if something goes wrong with the patched installation, it's no big deal.
 


Apple says Mojave is compatible for MacBook Pro circa 2012 and later. I have been skeptical about this notion for a while. My recent experience confirms my suspicions. After recently updating an early 2015 MacBook Pro directly from a fresh Sierra install, leapfrogging past High Sierra, since support for 10.13 has a short shelf life, the first thing I noticed about what I consider Mojave non-compatibility is this: When clearing up a cluttered Desktop, files, folders and other, it will pause, delay and hover over its destined folder. This behavior is somewhat reduced if the destination folder is open and in List mode.

At first I thought this might be some sort of reverse Genie effect... in Hollywood drama style of: Moving A File! I much prefer snappy folder actions. Time is wasted waiting for simple operations to resolve. In my view, this is defective Finder health – nice one, Apple – alas Mojave is at its last complete version, with the exception of security updates for a while, I think. Methinks Apple fibs regarding its system upgrades. I hate to think of the slog Catalina will produce on older systems! If I may indulge in this editorial comment, to wit: .... Sheesh!

Hmmm... it turns out this is a feature? Or behavior with respect to administrative privileges? I noticed that user accounts having standard privileges on the shared computer experience the "problem". This delayed action in Finder does not occur in user accounts having administrative privilege.
 


It is my understanding that macOS 10.14 Mojave will be supported for a while, still... a bit longer than High Sierra. So with this in mind, we updated as a test run, so to speak, a slightly older MacBook Pro to Mojave from a fresh Sierra (10.12) install.

I was quite surprised to find a list of neighbor's (presumably, and over 30 feet and structures away) Bluetooth devices populating the Bluetooth preferences pane. Needed to turn Bluetooth on in order to de-populate this list of unwanted, pesky, interlopers(?).

I admit much to be over my head with regard to a lot of IT things, especially these days....
Does this Bluetooth happenstance suggest something amiss, or sloppy with regard to macOS security?

To further editorialize... way not impressed with Mojave performance...

P.S. I see no Bluetooth preference feature, or configurable button, that will disallow recognition of stray devices
 


To update, with this and another couple of observations (disappointments with Mojave), something just did not seem quite right, so I proceeded to reinstall system software.

And because Mojave would not accommodate a Target Disk Mode install, with a little bit of consternation of having to download the latest version of Certified High Sierra... I am finding this "downgrade" a bit of a refreshing choice so far. System seems fine on the "older" Mac, although macOS 10.13 was more in keeping with the vintage of the particular computer anyway.

Feel free, anyone, to chime in on conjectures on Mojave Finder anomalies....
 


Feel free, anyone, to chime in on conjectures on Mojave Finder anomalies....
My recent Mojave install onto a mid-2012 MacBook Pro was easy-peasy (although it took a while), and once the machine calmed down a day or so later, has been just fine. For all the reasons you cite, however, I don't use Finder much. I can happily report that Path Finder 8 seems much more stable than Path Finder 7 was on Sierra.
 


Apple says Mojave is compatible for MacBook Pro circa 2012 and later. I have been skeptical about this notion for a while. My recent experience confirms my suspicions. After recently updating an early 2015 MacBook Pro directly from a fresh Sierra install, leapfrogging past High Sierra, since support for 10.13 has a short shelf life, the first thing I noticed about what I consider Mojave non-compatibility is this: When clearing up a cluttered Desktop, files, folders and other, it will pause, delay and hover over its destined folder. This behavior is somewhat reduced if the destination folder is open and in List mode.
If I understand correctly what you are trying to do, it sounds like you may need to adjust your "Spring-loading delay" setting:
  1. Open "System Preferences" from the Apple Menu.
  2. Click on the "Accessibility" preference icon.
  3. Scroll down to the "Mouse & Trackpad" icon, and click on it.
  4. Make sure that the box next to "Spring-loading delay" is checked, and then adjust the slider to your liking. If the slider is moved all the way to the left, there will be no noticeable delay between dragging an item over a folder and the folder opening. If the slider is moved to the right, it will take several seconds for the "reverse genie" effect to occur.
  5. While you are in the "Accessibility" preferences, you might consider scrolling to the "Display" accessibility preference and checking the boxes next to "Reduce motion" and "Reduce transparency." I haven't found it necessary to do that on my 2012 MacBook Pro, but that does lighten the graphics processing load.
If Mojave is not performing well on your 2015 machine, I suspect the problem is with an adjustable setting, misbehaving cache files, or something else, not with Mojave itself. There are a few articles on the Internet that share tips for improving Mojave performance, so you may want to look around and see if any of those might help.

FWIW, I upgraded several SSD-equipped 2012 MacBook Pros directly from Sierra to Mojave, and while I was frustrated by the annoying security prompts in the days after the upgrades, I found overall system performance to be excellent once the systems settled down. To me, Mojave feels roughly as snappy on those machines as Sierra.
 


If I understand correctly what you are trying to do, it sounds like you may need to adjust your "Spring-loading delay" setting...
Thanks for the comments and the refresh on the various Accessibility settings. In this particular case, I don't think the spring folder setting is at issue.

To try to clarify what I observed, and verified in the Mojave preference, is a bit difficult now, as I have reinstalled a different system at the moment. But to describe further: the process of clicking and dragging and dropping a file would result in the file hovering over the folder, while at this point the cursor has moved on, and the file would simply take a really, really long time to deposit itself in the folder, without spring-loading the folder - a process that engenders either a graphics delay... or a somewhat psychological one... as the symptom certainly kept my attention, making it hard to move on to other things.

For future: re-evaluation at some point, as High Sierra is out to pasture in November, I think. Thanks.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... the process of clicking and dragging and dropping a file would result in the file hovering over the folder, while at this point the cursor has moved on, and the file would simply take a really, really long time to deposit itself in the folder...
How many files do you have in that folder, and what types of files are they?
 


How many files do you have in that folder, and what types of files are they?
I don't think there was a file-specific relationship. Files included moving Word docs, Graphic Converter edits, and folders moved to an empty folder to collate and clean up the desktop.

Never noticed this with Sierra, or High Sierra, although... High Sierra does seem to have introduced some laggy processes in Finder and other actions like folders opening un-smoothly, or jerking/shifting into position, and choppy scrolling in Safari, which I think may be fixed with some Keyboard settings

I am sort of curious about the notion of "graphics load" and possible settings adjustments that could mitigate things to a smoother looking system operation. Sort of a truism, I guess: each system update introduces it's own odd anomalies, it seems.
 


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