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miscellaneous Apple issues

Whenever I attempt to make a FaceTime Audio call on my (WiFi only) iPad Air 2, I get an error that the iPad and iPhone (6 Plus) must be connected to the same WiFi network. Yet they are connected to the same network. I’ve also noticed sometimes when a regular phone call comes in Handoff (I assume Handoff) doesn’t make it ring on the iPad. If I want to make a FaceTime audio call, I toggle WiFi off on the iPad, then back on. After that it works fine. Both are running the latest iOS. Any thoughts or suggestions?
 


Whenever I attempt to make a FaceTime Audio call on my (WiFi only) iPad Air 2, I get an error that the iPad and iPhone (6 Plus) must be connected to the same WiFi network. Yet they are connected to the same network. I’ve also noticed sometimes when a regular phone call comes in Handoff (I assume Handoff) doesn’t make it ring on the iPad. If I want to make a FaceTime audio call, I toggle WiFi off on the iPad, then back on. After that it works fine. Both are running the latest iOS. Any thoughts or suggestions?
I'm not clear. The only time an iPhone is necessary for a call from an iPad is if you are trying to make a cell call (not actually a FaceTime call) via your iPad. True "FaceTime calls" can be made from Macs or iOS devices to other Macs or iOS devices over WiFi.

At any rate I would start by logging out of FaceTime on both devices and then log in again. Make sure the iPad is selected in the iPhone "Cellular>Calls on Other Devices" settings.
 


Whenever I attempt to make a FaceTime Audio call on my (WiFi only) iPad Air 2, I get an error that the iPad and iPhone (6 Plus) must be connected to the same WiFi network. Yet they are connected to the same network. I’ve also noticed sometimes when a regular phone call comes in Handoff (I assume Handoff) doesn’t make it ring on the iPad. If I want to make a FaceTime audio call, I toggle WiFi off on the iPad, then back on. After that it works fine. Both are running the latest iOS. Any thoughts or suggestions?
Does your network have both 2.4 & 5G speeds and if so, do they have the same name? When I set my network up like that, even though they were both connected to my network, when the computer and iPad were connected at different speeds, they did not see each other and sharing didn’t work. I reset my network to identify the different connections so I could be sure both devices were using the same protocol and haven’t had any problems since.
 


So, I was playing iTunes on my Mac and sending music to my HomePod in the kitchen (I could hear it playing from several rooms away). When I entered the kitchen, I asked "Hey Siri" to lower the music. Nothing. Again, I asked "Hey Siri" while looking up at HomePod to see if Siri visual indication was there. It was not.

I checked my phone, used Remote app and stopped music. Again I tried "Hey Siri" but no response to query. So, funny thing, I decided to immediately search if there were any recent issues with others and their HomePods. I did have it update to the iOS12 update for HomePod. The Home app showed all settings were correct. I toggled "Hey Siri" off, then on. No response. So, I decided to power-cycle it.

Well, it's up on a beam. Grabbed small ladder, and I touched the top of the Homepod - it was really warm!. After unplugging it, counting to 10, then plugging back into a "good" outlet, it came to life and I could see the + / - buttons lit. I asked, "Hey Siri, what's the weather", and she answered promptly.

I am not feeling good about this. If this is because I was using the HomePod as an AirPlay source (always have, since I don't subscribe to Apple Music), I don't understand why Siri stopped. It worked the day before. The Home app showed Siri was on. And iOS12 was done a week prior, and Siri was answering/playing podcast news on the weekend.

Honestly, I had a bad "electric juju" weekend. Lost an appliance, neighbor's fridge died, trailer electric brakes died, Tag Heuer watch stopped (battery voltage good). Did some EMP go off over the weekend? ;)
 


I am apparently one of the few who still use and find Dashboard Widgets kind of useful. Quite recently, the Weather widgets (branded as "Powered by Yahoo!" and "The Weather Channel" appear, but are now blanks, completely unpopulated with data. A look at Apple's downloads site for Widgets now shows only a single "weather" widget for the U.S., a tiny, not useful widget called "Fair Weather." I know I can set up and get this WX information via the notifications center, but I liked the visual display of the widgets - I have four, set for different areas. Seeing how old some of the widgets are at the download site, I'm guessing Apple will be letting this feature quietly vanish in the near future.
 


I am apparently one of the few who still use and find Dashboard Widgets kind of useful. Quite recently, the Weather widgets (branded as "Powered by Yahoo!" and "The Weather Channel" appear, but are now blanks, completely unpopulated with data. A look at Apple's downloads site for Widgets now shows only a single "weather" widget for the U.S., a tiny, not useful widget called "Fair Weather." I know I can set up and get this WX information via the notifications center, but I liked the visual display of the widgets - I have four, set for different areas. Seeing how old some of the widgets are at the download site, I'm guessing Apple will be letting this feature quietly vanish in the near future.
I was just thinking about this the other day, when after installing the macOS 10.14.4 update, I noticed the original, default Apple "Weather" widget's display was blank, aside from the location name. My guess is that their assumption is that everyone uses iOS or other mobile devices for that sort of information now, and that, as the iOS framework for AppKit Craig Federighi discussed at last year's WWDC is developed, we'll use ported iOS apps instead of widgets. A shame, because many of the widgets were very useful to me, and simply hitting a function key to get that information was a lot simpler than clicking on a series of Dock icons.

Guess I'll have to break down and start using Space to organize such things (something I've avoided, because I hate its quirks), which won't allow the viewing of primary display information at the same time as widgets/apps.
 


I am apparently one of the few who still use and find Dashboard Widgets kind of useful. Quite recently, the Weather widgets (branded as "Powered by Yahoo!" and "The Weather Channel" appear, but are now blanks, completely unpopulated with data.
I, too, still use Dashboard Widgets and also noticed that the Weather widget recently stopped working. My most useful widget is iStat Pro v4.9.2 -- long since replaced by iStat Menus.
 


I noticed the original, default Apple "Weather" widget's display was blank, aside from the location name. My guess is that their assumption is that everyone uses iOS or other mobile devices for that sort of information now…
My guess is when Yahoo got bought by Verizon, they turned the data feeds off, breaking weather and finance widgets and who-knows-what-all. I base this guess on my experience with Apple widgets and other utilities that fed off Yahoo, including the fact that the feeds disappeared shortly after the takeover. Conjecturally, maybe a contract with Apple expired, too.

A web search for yahoo verizon weather feeds indicates that Yahoo still has a Weather API and that the old API is "retired." My fiddling with this stuff in the past indicates that the feeds used by the Apple widgets were simple HTTP queries that returned a string, with no Magick API Keys, etc.

See Weather - Yahoo Developer Network
 


I, too, still use Dashboard Widgets and also noticed that the Weather widget recently stopped working. My most useful widget is iStat Pro v4.9.2 -- long since replaced by iStat Menus.
A few weeks ago after a reboot, the Weather widget stopped working, so I found Weather Widget Desktop. It's not a Dashboard widget, but I like having visual icons of the weather as well as a few days forecast. iStat Nano still works as a Dashboard widget. (I seem to remember modifying it for OS X 10.10, and it's still working in macOS 10.12.6.)
 


A few weeks ago after a reboot, the Weather widget stopped working, so I found Weather Widget Desktop. It's not a Dashboard widget, but I like having visual icons of the weather as well as a few days forecast. iStat Nano still works as a Dashboard widget. (I seem to remember modifying it for OS X 10.10, and it's still working in macOS 10.12.6.)
Same here. I started using the 11-year-old Accuweather Dashboard Widget, version 1.0.2, which still works on macOS 10.13.6. Its interface is a bit hokey, but then so was the Yahoo widget! I wish I could remember where I got it, but it was many years ago. There are some hits on DuckDuckGo - be careful out there!
 




It may be interesting that the Weather widget is continuing to work in older macOS versions e.g. El Capitan.
For me, Weather widget does not work on OS X 10.8.5 or macOS 10.12.5. In both OSes, Console says, "DashboardClient: com.apple.widget.weather: Fetching data failed, no <result>"

So, I wonder what's up. To be clear, /Library/Widgets/Weather is version 2.0.7 (on OS X 10.8.5) and 2.0.8 (on macOS 10.12.5).

Also, I'm suffering some déjà vu about this issue; are those whose widgets are working certain that they are updating and not showing some old stale data?
 


It may be interesting that the Weather widget is continuing to work in older macOS versions e.g. El Capitan.
I just rebooted into Snow Leopard and Mountain Lion. The Yahoo Weather widget does not work in either of these older OS'es.

A quick journey over the Apple dashboard site lists many widgets -- but most of the links are broken. For example, the Fair Weather widget page shows the widget is developed by CH4 Productions but following that link takes you to the LegoBoy web site. Many of the widgets redirect to this site.

What a mess!
 


A quick journey over the Apple dashboard site lists many widgets -- but most of the links are broken. For example, the Fair Weather widget page shows the widget is developed by CH4 Productions but following that link takes you to the LegoBoy web site. Many of the widgets redirect to this site.
Heh, I did the same as you, with an extra step: the Fair Weather widget can be had via the Internet Archive:

Fair Weather seems a decent replacement for the Apple widget if you're interested in USA weather. Simple design. Talks to US NOAA. Works.

LegoBoy and CH4 seem to be the same person.

All those out of date and missing widgets at Apple's Dashboard Widgets site remind me of a garage sale or thrift store. As a daily Dashboard user, it seems a little sad.
 


Same here. I started using the 11-year-old Accuweather Dashboard Widget, version 1.0.2, which still works on macOS 10.13.6. Its interface is a bit hokey, but then so was the Yahoo widget! I wish I could remember where I got it, but it was many years ago. There are some hits on DuckDuckGo - be careful out there!
Some of my widgets disappeared after I upgraded to High Sierra. The Weather Channel works, the Movie widget works, the MLB widget still works, and Amazon now works when it did not in Sierra.
 


A suggestion for those lamenting the loss of some favorite widgets: it's still possible to create your own widget by simply selecting a part of any weather page in Safari. Under the File menu, you'll find "Open in Dashboard..." Of course, this applies to just about anything you can view in Safari, not just weather.
 


I just made an interesting discovery (as Apple likes to hide things). It turns out that a lot of things that seemed to be available as Widgets are now available under the "Notification" panel. In particular, I was surprised that weather (including multiple locations) is available under the "Today" tab in the Notifications panel.

And there is a link to the App Store "Notification Widgets Center". It appears that Apple has replaced the more traditional Widgets with this new version.

I don't recall hearing about this with the various OS upgrades (I'm using El Capitan), but I find it just about as easy as the traditional Widgets.
 



My most useful widget is iStat Pro v4.9.2 -- long since replaced by iStat Menus.
Yup. That's another one I've been using from Dashboard for a long time. I haven't really wanted to switch to iStat Menus. I've already got way too many of those little bitty icons up in the menu bar (plus a couple of dozen or so things downstairs in the Dock).
 


Yup. That's another one I've been using from Dashboard for a long time. I haven't really wanted to switch to iStat Menus. I've already got way too many of those little bitty icons up in the menu bar (plus a couple of dozen or so things downstairs in the Dock).
If you have too many items in your menu bar, you might consider getting Bartender, which allows you to maintain an alternate menu bar.
 




Howard Oakley writes about a major change coming in the next macOS Mojave release, though it won't be immediately obvious to end users:
Eclectic Light Co. said:
Apple quietly pre-announces major change in macOS 10.14.4
... This isn’t something that users will notice immediately, but is the culmination of nearly a decade of heavy investment and the efforts of many of the finest software engineers: Swift 5.0. Before you abandon reading this thinking it’s relevant to those writing apps, not those using them, please bear with me: this will change your Mac, because it marks the moment that Swift becomes part of macOS.
... In releasing Swift 5.0 at this stage of the Mojave cycle, Apple is preparing the way for 10.15.
I think this change should receive more attention. I suspect one holdup on release of the next Mac Pro has been completion of the object-oriented operating system. I predict the next “component” Mac Pro will require the OO operating system, and be available, along with macOS 10.15, next fall.

My comments are speculation based on general knowledge and following Apple developments for years, with no information about specific details. For several weeks I have been looking at a draft of this comment, knowing that although the general idea may be valid, the details might be laughable to those who really understand. Then I realized, that is why we have MacInTouch. Please consider this as much a question as statement. Does it make sense? My intention is to provide a framework for thoughts about the upcoming changes. I encourage comments from others who know more, to correct my misperceptions and poor guesses, or confirm where appropriate. I suspect those who really understand may be constrained by NDAs.

Incorporation of Swift will enable more fully a transition of macOS from procedural to object-oriented form. Encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance characteristic of OO design will facilitate simultaneous deployment of various disparate hardware implementations.

Finalization in macOS 14.4 of the Application Binary Interfaces (ABI) will allow software objects representing various hardware devices to interact interchangeably. A potential problem is if OO software adds overhead that reduces performance. However, software performance depends to a very large extent on compiler function. Apple builds its own compliers, so the compilers can be optimized to compile Swift OO source code into efficient applications.

An object-oriented operating system might have a root software class which defines messages and data by which other parts of the system interact. Subclasses for specific processors would allow encapsulation of processor operation entirely in local variables. Subclasses specific to a particular type of processor would inherit the same ABI to interact with other parts of the system, while using ARM, Intel, AMD or graphics subsystem processors and local variables. Such varied implementation would be examples of polymorphism enabled by inheritance. Encapsulation would isolate the details of processor use, allowing each software object subclass to be optimized by the processor manufacturer.

Other software objects could similarly isolate other hardware component details, while standard ABIs facilitate integration with the system. A system would be composed of interacting relatively independent modules. End users could build their system by choosing components which meet their needs. If they prefer low-energy, low-cost processing, they could choose ARM processors. If they need ECC or other functions supplied by X86 processors, they could choose Intel, or AMD, processors. If they need coprocessing power for compute-intensive jobs, they could choose whatever processor best meets their needs, including choosing among any type of graphics coprocessors.

A first step towards such a system would be production of an object-oriented operating system. Apple has been working towards this for about ten years. A penultimate step might be an operating system in which the specifications for interactions among software objects, the Application Binary Interface, was stable. That is Mojave 10.14.4, as Apple advised us and Howard Oakley pointed out.

A system which defines stable interactions among software components will allow Apple to optimize its compilers, and hardware component manufacturers to create software objects which encapsulate their devices, and begin to optimize them. The “final” step will be release of a fully object-oriented operating system, along with a variety of hardware components which the OO system allows to be interchangeable. That will be macOS 10.15, accompanying the new Mac Pro.

Attaining the long-sought goal of an OO system linking disparate hardware components will be an achievement, but in no way “final”. Rather, it will be the first instance of future computer systems that are extendable and configurable in whatever ways the user desires, using whatever hardware the market provides.

Release of Mojave 10.14.4 with a stable Application Binary Interfaces should allow independent component manufacturers to begin production of hardware components, along with their encapsulating software object, designed to integrate with Mac systems. The timing is appropriate to reveal preliminary components, and perhaps a preliminary example of an assembled system, at the WWDC in June. Will Nvidia provide an early example of alternate hardware enabled by encapsulation in a graphics driver subclass? Will Olympus, with a subclass enabling use of its TG-5 camera?

This is all speculation. To my uninformed mind it sounds pretty good. But “if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” Does any of this make sense?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I suspect one holdup on release of the next Mac Pro has been completion of the object-oriented operating system. I predict the next “component” Mac Pro will require the OO operating system, and be available, along with macOS 10.15, next fall....
I know that Object Oriented Programming for the Macintosh goes back a very long way, even before NeXTSTEP, the object-oriented operating system that morphed into Mac OS X.

I'm not sure how macOS 10.15 and Swift could take that concept further (but I'm no expert on the topic), and I wonder how it could solve critical user interface issues with the vastly different iOS touch-based approach vs. the classic macOS keyboard/mouse-based approach.

Or are you thinking Apple would abandon the Mac OS user interface model for a touch-based design across all systems? Or somehow combine the two? Plus Apple Watch and Apple TV?

Ultimately, I suppose, we'll be interacting with something else - artificial intelligence agents - in a radically different user interface (currently represented by the nascent voice-based Siri, Alexa, and Google AI agents, among others).

I'll be very interested to see what Apple introduces at WWDC in June, but I'd be surprised if it's a new object-oriented operating system to span all its hardware platforms. In fact, to me it looks like Apple is in the process of building an AI operating system....
Apple said:
Metal 2
Building on an efficient low-overhead architecture with precompiled shaders, fine-grained resource control, and multithreading support, Metal 2 evolves to give the GPU even greater control of its graphics pipeline, accelerate neural network training, and provide powerful new tools that give deep insight into your shader code.

Create ML
Use Create ML with familiar tools like Swift and macOS playgrounds to create and train custom machine learning models on your Mac.

SiriKit
Siri handles all of the user interaction, including the voice and natural language recognition, and works with your extension to get information and handle user requests.

GKStrategist
A general interface for objects that provide artificial intelligence for use in turn-based (and similar) games.

IBM Watson Services for Core ML
Your apps can quickly analyze images, accurately classify visual content, and easily train models using Watson Services. Get started with pre-trained Watson models, or customize and train models that continuously learn over time.

2018 Platforms State of the Union
"Machine Learning is at the foundation of our operating systems and many of our applications."
The Verge said:
Apple has poached another of Google’s top AI researchers
AI is a key technology for tech companies and finding researchers who can push forward cutting-edge products is a huge challenge. Google is generally seen as the world’s top AI company, but Apple also uses the technology throughout its products, powering everything from facial recognition to photography.
 


I know that Object Oriented Programming for the Macintosh goes back a very long way, even before NeXTSTEP, the object-oriented operating system that morphed into Mac OS X.

I'm not sure how macOS 10.15 and Swift could take that concept further...
NeXSTEP was an object-oriented layer on top of Unix (which remains a procedural OS under macOS, as far as I know). Are they planning to move lower layers of the OS to object-oriented? BeOS tried to take object-oriented development down to the smallest elements of its kernel, but I don't think Apple wants to do that? (Be was fun to code though.)
 


I know that Object Oriented Programming for the Macintosh goes back a very long way, even before NeXTSTEP, the object-oriented operating system that morphed into Mac OS X.

I'm not sure how macOS 10.15 and Swift could take that concept further (but I'm no expert on the topic), and I wonder how it could solve critical user interface issues with the vastly different iOS touch-based approach vs. the classic macOS keyboard/mouse-based approach.

Or are you thinking Apple would abandon the Mac OS user interface model for a touch-based design across all systems? Or somehow combine the two? Plus Apple Watch and Apple TV?

Ultimately, I suppose, we'll be interacting with something else - artificial intelligence agents - in a radically different user interface (currently represented by the nascent voice-based Siri, Alexa, and Google AI agents, among others).

I'll be very interested to see what Apple introduces at WWDC in June, but I'd be surprised if it's a new object-oriented operating system to span all its hardware platforms. In fact, to me it looks like Apple is in the process of building an AI operating system....
The Kurt Schmucker book you mention, plus Macintosh Programers Workshop, with implementation in Tom Leonard’s TML Pascal (for Macintosh, not Apple II), were my introduction to object-oriented programming. That illustrates how long these ideas have been around, especially at Apple, as well as how antiquated my knowledge is. Yet, as the details change, the principle of the advantages of object-oriented software remain.

The issues and technologies you mention illustrate the advantage of an object-oriented operating system. The operating system in itself need not implement any particular user interface format, nor processor bit-pushing protocol, nor storage mechanism, etc. In object-oriented software, such operations are handled by local methods using local variables. Encapsulation hides these local details. The rest of the operating system interacts only with the results, which are provided in the same form by all objects of this class, through the Application Binary Interface.

The structure of classes and inheriting subclasses are be provided in the development environment framework. The details of what classes, subclasses, messaging systems, etc., work best, is part theory and part empiricism. Some changes can be expected from ongoing optimization of the existing system, some from adaptation of the class system to enable newly developed technology, and hopefully allow future subclasses to accept further, as yet unforeseen, developments. Getting to Swift 5 and its stable ABIs has taken a long time.

The new technologies you mention, I believe, all illustrate the need for, as well as advantages of, a fully object-oriented operating system. It may help to remember that macOS and iOS are both branches from BSD Unix. While macOS adheres to the much more complex multi-whatever (user, processor, disk, network connection…) Unix standard, at one time meeting the POSIX 3 standard, iOS was stripped down to a much simpler single-whatever system. I suspect these differences can be implemented as subclass variants in a unified object-oriented operating system. Creating such a unified system would involve essentially cleaning up existing code. (I know, easy for me to say…)

Let’s suppose the class structure of such a unified operating system included class UserInterface, with subclasses Touch, Mouse, Spoken… Each subclass would implement methods locally, as appropriate for a particular type of hardware, and interact with the system through methods inherited from parent class UserInterface, expressed in a standard Application Binary Interface.

A class structure for your other examples is a little more difficult for us to imagine, but only because we are more accustomed to using a keyboard than Machine Learning. How about class Computation, with subclass ArtificialIntelligence, which has subclasses SuppliedRules and MachineLearning. MachineLearning can be further subclassed as ANN and SteelGROK. (SteelGROK involves wearing a metal band around your head which connects to a USB-C port, and is something I just made up to illustrate extension to unforeseen future technology.)

Class Computation/ArtificialIntelligence/MachineLearning/ANN would illustrate the value of the object-oriented property of encapsulation. Training an ANN typically involves processing a large set of data, comprised of similar but not necessarily identical instances of digital representations of something. Training would involve a lot of computation, which encapsulation would isolate from other system processes. This computation process of training the ANN would be carried out through methods internal to each subclass of class ANN, which through object-oriented polymorphism could be specific to particular types of hardware. The ANN software object would interact with the system in receiving the training data, and returning the trained ANN, through the standard Application Binary Interface. One ANN subclass could run on the A10 (or whatever) processor in your watch, another on a fire-breathing external array of graphics cards, a third might call in IBM’s Watson for some serious ANN processing. An instance of any subclass would be seen by the system as an identical ABI interface, the difference between instances of various subclasses presumably being one would finish the process more rapidly.

I think your examples make my point nicely. In Apple’s demonstration, Machine Learning in the form of pattern learning and recognition is incorporated into a program with a simple line or two of code. That illustrates the benefit of object-oriented design. The software knows standard data input will be the contents of a folder. What the software object does is “analyze contents of a folder added to this folder for similarities, to be designated by the name of the folder”. The methods and functions by which this is done are hidden from the programmer, encapsulated within the software object. The result is a trained ANN, a form of artificial intelligence, which (after training) can classify unknown objects with 96% accuracy. The Application Binary Interface for the trained ANN is input a digital image of a flower, output the name of the flower. Encapsulation hides the details of the ANN. Inheritance and polymorphism allows instances of other subclasses to use other hardware, and/or different forms of AI, to process the data by arbitrarily different methods which are also hidden, receiving input and providing output in the same forms dictated by the standard Application Binary Interface.

I think this is the major development which Howard Oakley was bringing to our attention.
 


The following two lines should be modified:
End users could build their system by choosing components which meet their needs.
to:

"End users could build their system by choosing components that Apple allows."

and
Rather, it will be the first instance of future computer systems that are extendable and configurable in whatever ways the user desires, using whatever hardware the market provides.
to

"Rather, it will be the first instance of future computer systems that are extendable and configurable in whatever ways that Apple allows us, using whatever hardware that Apple has certified."
 


I purchased a "used, excellent quality" gold AT&T iPhone Xs 256GB from a reputable online trade-in company. It came in a plain box, along with an aftermarket charger and cable. I turned it on and migrated from my iPhone X. Settings showed that I had 26 days left to purchase AppleCare+. When I did, the expiration date showed up as April 21, 2021. Generally, you get 60 days from the purchase date to buy AppleCare+, and it expires 2 years from the date that the phone was first activated.

I also was able to use a Dutch SIM in it.

Why is this interesting? It means that the phone that I received was brand new, never activated and unlocked. I wonder if Apple is dumping iPhones through this merchant?
 


I purchased a "used, excellent quality" gold AT&T iPhone Xs 256GB from a reputable online trade-in company. It came in a plain box, along with an aftermarket charger and cable. I turned it on and migrated from my iPhone X. Settings showed that I had 26 days left to purchase AppleCare+.
... Why is this interesting? It means that the phone that I received was brand new, never activated and unlocked. I wonder if Apple is dumping iPhones through this merchant?
Maybe. It could also have been from someone who bought it and returned/resold it soon afterward.

The fact that you got an aftermarket charger tells me that it was not "dumped" from Apple - such a phone would not come bundled with non-Apple gear.

I suppose it could also be an illegal resale. Like the repair-and-return scam that two people were recently arrested for.

It's impossible to know for sure without additional information, of course.
 




Hi, Ric... it was Gazelle.com. Even though the listing said that it was an AT&T phone, it was a never-activated unlocked phone.
Who is this Gazelle? They suddenly are all over me on Facebook and other sites. Their website is very seductive, but flakey... try reading their FAQs. Pricing is great, but no mention of what model you're buying or any warranty.

Are they legit? Long term? Anyone have experience with them?
 


Who is this Gazelle? They suddenly are all over me on Facebook and other sites. Their website is very seductive, but flakey... try reading their FAQs. Pricing is great, but no mention of what model you're buying or any warranty. Are they legit? Long term? Anyone have experience with them?
When I was looking for a new iPhone, the site showed exactly what model, what carrier, locked or unlocked, condition and more. Since they are not an authorized reseller, Apple’s warranty may or may not apply, depending on the first activation date. They offer their own 1-year warranty at an additional charge.
Wikipedia said:
Gazelle (Internet company)
Gazelle is an eCommerce company founded in 2006 that lets people sell their used electronic devices, such as cell phones, tablets and computers. The company pays consumers for used or broken electronic devices. It is headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts with operations in Louisville, Kentucky.
 


For many years I've been using Numbers in iWork 9 under Snow Leopard, but just lately I've had to switch to v5.1 running on Sierra. Also new in the mix is a Mac Mini (late 2014).

What I'm finding tricky is being able to work over two screens - my main display and a projector.

Using Keynote is problem-free, and it works as expected with my annotated view on my screen and the audience display sans notes on the projector. However, in Numbers I use a spreadsheet with a chart. I created a wide window, so that the spreadsheet is on my screen and the chart is on the projector. The audience doesn't see the spreadsheet, but they see the chart change as data is either entered or changed.

Now I can't do that. The wide window no longer extends onto the second screen. It appears there in a semi-transparent fashion as I drag it over, but the moment I release the mouse, it vanishes. In fact, the same thing happens to any window dragged off the side of the main display. The only way to get a window to stick is to drag it completely off the main display - and that is what I don't want!

Is this a function of the Mac Mini, Sierra or Numbers? Or is it that the projector is connected via a Thunderbolt-to-VGA adaptor. (Can't see the projector being replaced unless it blows up!)

Or, Is there a way of making the chart into a separate window? If there is, I haven't found a way how yet.
 


My comments are speculation based on general knowledge and following Apple developments for years, with no information about specific details. For several weeks I have been looking at a draft of this comment, knowing that although the general idea may be valid, the details might be laughable to those who really understand. Then I realized, that is why we have MacInTouch. Please consider this as much a question as statement. Does it make sense? My intention is to provide a framework for thoughts about the upcoming changes. I encourage comments from others who know more, to correct my misperceptions and poor guesses, or confirm where appropriate. I suspect those who really understand may be constrained by NDAs.
Incorporation of Swift will enable more fully a transition of macOS from procedural to object-oriented form. Encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance characteristic of OO design will facilitate simultaneous deployment of various disparate hardware implementations.
Wow, long interesting posting that could support a very long reply in response. But here's a short (?) one with just a couple of observations.

I apologize for the slightly graceless phrasing, but I think a high-level thought might be that you're looking at a long, gradual, and continuing evolution and hypothesizing a coming revolution instead. A lot of what you describe has been true for a while, and, really, some of it dates to the very dawn of the Mac OS (not "Mac OS X", but the original one!).

One example: Apple more or less pioneered the use of object-oriented constructs for hardware-level programming in a consumer OS early in the evolution of OS X with IOKit, the OS X framework for writing device drivers. The first sentence of this document says:
This document explains the terminology, concepts, architecture, and basic mechanisms of the I/O Kit, Apple’s object-oriented framework for developing device drivers for OS X.
This did exactly as you describe. It simplified the task of writing support for mix-and-match new hardware of various classes, because you could just sub-class an object of the right type, rather than starting from scratch.

In my opinion, IOKit was a real eye-opener when it first showed up, because until then most people outside of academia had thought of object-oriented programming models as too inefficient to use in device drivers. Apple reducing this to practice was quite the innovation.

But, if you look more generally, OS X was object oriented at its heart from Day One. The OS X kernel is rooted in CMU Mach, which is fundamentally organized around message passing between objects that provide the core services of the OS. All sorts of caveats in practice, but the key idea was exactly as you say - an object that provided a given service, say, memory management, could be replaced by a different one that provided the service differently or on different hardware, without the rest of the system needing to change.

Mach was a low-level OS kernel, but NextStep carried the same object-oriented ideas through to the rest of the OS with Objective C as the programming language and the various 'kits' that implemented higher-level objects of various types. So it seems reasonable to say that OS X has been heavily object-oriented in its programming approach ever since it was created.

But all of this OS X history, as interesting as it might be, was not completely radical at the time. What I personally find even more amazing is that some of these ideas could be found in the very first Mac OS, in 1984. The code objects were called 'resources' instead of objects, and the whole thing was hand-optimized beyond belief, but the basic idea of opaque code fragments that implemented a particular class of thing according to a defined protocol, and which could be overridden, replaced, subclassed, etc., was there in the 128K ROM. It's hard to look back and see it from 35 years later, but the sheer level of flexibility, capability, and evolvability that this very object-oriented design gave the Mac OS back then compared to alternatives could very well be why there's still something called a Mac in existence today..
 




I miss ResEdit. ('Nuff said.)
Yes, indeed. My first Mac (my first computer, too), was a Mac Plus, on which I proceeded to max out the RAM to one whole megabyte, so I could set up a RAM disk for speedy operation! Later, while working overseas, I wanted to trade up to the Mac LC. Some friends wanted to buy the Mac Plus, but they needed a French version of the OS.With good old ResEdit, I went into the system, and edited/translated every single English language interface element, dialog box, warning, etc., and "rolled my own" French Macintosh System 6 for my friends. We were all quite happy. But boy, did I feel stupid when I learned that I could have gone to a local store, there in France, and walked out with the appropriate System 6 diskettes!
 


Who is this Gazelle? .... Are they legit? Long term? Anyone have experience with them?
In September, 2018 I purchased from Gazelle a MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015), 2.8 GHz Intel Core i7, 16 GB 1600 MHz DDR3, Dual Graphics (AMD Radeon R9 M370X 2048 MB & Intel Iris Pro 1536 MB). It was described as being in excellent condition, and appearance-wise, that was the case. Nary a mark on it and display was flawless. It came with the original shipping OS loaded, and with a new Apple charging brick and cord. The battery check with coconutBattery indicated it was at 95% of design capacity. It is currently at 93%.

I wiped the SSD, reinstalled OS, upgraded, encrypted and trimmed, and then brought over my data (following Howard Oakley's excellent step by step instructions). It has run faultlessly since, and I have been very pleased with the purchase. This is my only experience with Gazelle.
 


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