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KJM

Can anyone who has made the move from a 6/7/8 Plus to the iPhone XR/ iPhone 11 (non-Pro) comment on whether the reduction in screen size (not resolution) has been a problem, specifically with regard to using the keyboard?
I made the move from an iPhone 6 Plus to the iPhone XR, and I ended, in fact, a little bit disappointed when I realized that the screen of the 6 Plus had a larger pixel resolution (5.5", 1920-by-1080-pixel) than the iPhone XR (6.1", 1792-by-828-pixel). But you will notice this difference only when you try to edit cells in spreadsheet apps like Excel or Numbers.
 


I've posted here before about wanting to upgrade from the iPhone 6 Plus to the 8 Plus but, the more I think about it, I would be foolish to intentionally put myself more than a single generation behind, if I'm going to spend money on a new phone... unless I want to find myself behind the curve once again – and sooner than I had hoped.

Therefore, I have a question for the community: I have large fingers; that's what drove me to get the 6 Plus rather than the 6. Can anyone who has made the move from a 6/7/8 Plus to the iPhone XR/ iPhone 11 (non-Pro) comment on whether the reduction in screen size (not resolution) has been a problem, specifically with regard to using the keyboard?

The XR and 11 are the only two models in consideration, so that is why I am concerned about sizing. I think they're just about identical, right?
Although the iPhone 11 is smaller in overall size than the 6 Plus, the screen size is actually about the same. It's a bit narrower but taller. The 11 and the Xr have the same screen resolution. The pixel resolution on the 6 Plus and the 11/Xr are different. Bottom line: go to the store and try it out to see if it will suit you.
 


But you will notice this difference only when you try to edit cells in spreadsheet apps like Excel or Numbers.
This is just me, but I couldn't imagine doing that kind of work on even the largest, highest-res iPhone. I'd still want more screen to work with.

On the other hand, when I saw the first iPad, those kinds of applications came immediately to mind.
 



It's from a different industry, but this article reminds me of why the two "new" Macs I bought for my business this year were both 13" mid-2012 MacBook Pros:
Sometime back, I read a book called "One Second After" [Amazon], which was about what life might be like after a massive EMP takes out most of America's technology. In the town that the story was centered in, a local hero was a guy who restored vintage VW bugs for fun. After the event, his were the only cars that would still run. Keeping some 40-year-old tech around might not be such a bad idea.
 


Sometime back, I read a book called "One Second After" [Amazon], which was about what life might be like after a massive EMP takes out most of America's technology. In the town that the story was centered in, a local hero was a guy who restored vintage VW bugs for fun. After the event, his were the only cars that would still run. Keeping some 40-year-old tech around might not be such a bad idea.
Or getting some surge suppressors with picosecond response times instead of nanoseconds.
 


Sometime back, I read a book called "One Second After" [Amazon], which was about what life might be like after a massive EMP takes out most of America's technology. In the town that the story was centered in, a local hero was a guy who restored vintage VW bugs for fun. After the event, his were the only cars that would still run. Keeping some 40-year-old tech around might not be such a bad idea.
I don't blame the farmers one bit for getting fed up with all the nonsense. The same thing has been happening in the passenger vehicle world too... the amount of technology and complexity in modern cars has gotten out of hand, but most consumers don't realize it until they have to start paying crazy high repair bills. Some makers are even going out of their way to prevent owners from performing even the simplest maintenance tasks themselves, like omitting engine oil dipsticks, so you need a dealer scan tool to just check the oil level.

Not to sound like I'm bragging, but I own a '68 Beetle, and the difference between working on it vs. my family's modern cars is truly astonishing. It's like the difference between working on a Power Mac G4 vs. a new iMac... one's designed to be fixed/upgraded, one isn't.
 


I don't blame the farmers one bit for getting fed up with all the nonsense. The same thing has been happening in the passenger vehicle world too... the amount of technology and complexity in modern cars has gotten out of hand, but most consumers don't realize it until they have to start paying crazy high repair bills. \[snip]
I used to own a 1985 Volvo that I bought used. At one point, it developed an oil leak, which the mechanics said could be caused by one of three things. They recommended starting with the repair of the most likely cause, and seeing if that did the trick. By Murphy's law, it turned out to be the third, and least likely cause — and since it was a Volvo, and parts cost roughly the same as the Hope diamond, I'd pretty much paid for a replacement used car by the time that did the trick.

I replaced that with a new, 2000 New Beetle. It worked great for 15 years; the only issues in all that time were (1) when it needed a new battery (twice) and (2) when a dealer mechanic failed to adjust the tension in a power steering belt during a tuneup. The belt managed to stay on throughout the ~ 25 minute drive home, and politely came loose as I was pulling out of my driveway the next morning. I suppose power steering is a luxury, but there are plenty of belts in older cars, as well.

I'm OK with a certain level of technology (say, the OBD II port and associated embedded CPUs, which allow me, and the state, to check emissions levels), but I draw the line at Internet connections that exist only so the manufacturer can sell data about me, my vehicle, where I've been, and so on to people who want to sell me ads — or worse.

#security #privacy
 


So long as we are veering way off topic into tractors and vintage Bugs, I'll add another. In the late 1950s I replaced the main camshaft bearings on my Austin A40 while lying in a street gutter with the passenger side wheels up on the curb. I fixed almost everything in the engine compartment of that car at one time or another.
 


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