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Somebody here should appreciate this. In the days of the "DOS Compatible" PPC models i.e. 6100/66 w/DOS compatibility card (circa 1995-1996), a co-worker who was a LINUX guru was writing some AppleScript and Perl code, we were utilizing the DOS card for something, I forget the details, but we were having some friendly platform banter one day and he says (imagine your best Darth Vader impersonation, with clenched fist) "you don't knnnooww the powah of the DOS Side". Still cracks me up. Jesse, if you're out there, you da man!
 


Had a dozen of these in my company. I left the organization and, a couple of years later, someone dropped off all dozen at my house saying they no longer would power up and did I want them for play toys. I did. Scratched my head for a minute or two and then remembered that these Power Macs would fail to turn on when...wait for it...their PRAM batteries went dead. Replaced the batteries and they all fired up. Sold 'em locally to DOS-heads. (Couldn't give 'em away today, eh?)
 


Dare I post a picture of my (outgoing, going, gone) garage sale stack of same said Macs and their cousins?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Well, FWIW, some macintouch.com servers ran for years on these "pizza boxes" (although I wasn't using the DOS card version). Accessibility! Those were a model of easy access - something sadly lacking in the Mac Mini. :-(
 



Had a dozen of these in my company. I left the organization and, a couple of years later, someone dropped off all dozen at my house saying they no longer would power up and did I want them for play toys. I did. Scratched my head for a minute or two and then remembered that these Power Macs would fail to turn on when...wait for it...their PRAM batteries went dead. Replaced the batteries and they all fired up. Sold 'em locally to DOS-heads. (Couldn't give 'em away today, eh?)
Wasn't that true of all the ones that used the 9-volt battery for the PRAM instead of the half-size AA?
 


I think the 9V was only Performa PPC 603 6xxx and 5xxx series machines if I recall correctly. Just quick Googled to confirm it at least wasn't the 61xx family.
 


...their PRAM batteries went dead. Replaced the batteries and they all fired up.
Reminds me of what I had to do for my Apple IIGS. Dead PRAM battery, so system settings and the clock got reset with every power-down. In this case, the 1/2AA battery was soldered to the motherboard, so there was no easy fix. (I think later motherboards had a socket).

In my case, I carefully removed the battery with diagonal cutters, leaving as much of the vertical posts (from the motherboard to the battery) as possible. I bought a cheap 2-cell AA battery holder and soldered it to the posts. So when I lose the clock in this computer today, I just replace the AA batteries, which is really cheap and easy. The voltage isn't exactly right (3v instead of 3.6v) but it seems to work just fine for keeping the system settings.
 


I think the 9V was only Performa PPC 603 6xxx and 5xxx series machines if I recall correctly. Just quick Googled to confirm it at least wasn't the 61xx family.
Some of the towers took that battery too, I seem to remember. I had brand-new batteries of both types in my kit and that was the first thing I would try with a non-booting 9 V battery Mac.
 



Well, FWIW, some macintouch.com servers ran for years on these "pizza boxes" (although I wasn't using the DOS card version). Accessibility! Those were a model of easy access - something sadly lacking in the Mac Mini. :-(
I setup a web server in 1993 on a Mac SE/30. It worked fine! I don't recall what I used for the software, perhaps someone can jog my memory. To browse I used the original NCSA Mosaic web browser.
 
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From TIDbits:

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Susan Kare [dogcow creator] Honored with AIGA Medal

Susan Kare, who designed the icons and some of the fonts for the original Macintosh, has been awarded the prestigious AIGA medal. Previous recipients include design legends like Paul Rand, who Kare brought in to NeXT to develop the company’s distinctive logo.

To celebrate Kare’s achievements, the New Yorker has published a profile of Kare, who has designed icons for Microsoft, Facebook, and Pinterest, where she is now a creative director.
 


My every-day belt, which was custom made by a leatherworking friend. Unfortunately she could not produce a Clarus stamp, so I had to settle for MOOF. Sadly, in the five years I've worn it only one person has ever asked what it meant. And a millennial Apple-authorized repair tech didn't even know!
[ATTACH]57[/ATTACH]
 



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... Before that we had PhoneNet that used regular telephone wire.
My first exposure to Macs was in 1986. The company had a LocalTalk network linking over 30 Macs on three floors. The network went far beyond specifications for both cable length and the number of connectors. When it would crash (several times a week) I'd have to walk the building shutting down all Macs and then walk it again powering them back on.

Once I installed PhoneNet our network problems nearly vanished. I setup a Kinetics FastPath to link the Macs to our Ethernet network containing both Thick-Ethernet (10Base5) and Thin-Ethernet (10Base2). Cutting into the 10Base5 coax to add a vampire tap was a royal PITA. The FastPath enabled developers to telnet from their quiet offices into the noisy computer room containing a myriad of Unix based computers including Apollo Domain, Silicon Graphics, MASSCOMP, and Sun.

We were acquired by BBN, the developers of ARPANET, the predecessor to the Internet. They used some of their original equipment to hook us up to ARPANET. I've been on the Internet since 1987!
 



I maintained a similar network in the Director's offices at the Oak Ridge National Lab in the late 80s-early 90s. I quickly learned when I got a call about the network being down to ask if anyone had moved out recently. More often than not someone had, and just left the LocalTalk wires hanging in the office. I'd take an adapter up and plug them in (LocalTalk was a daisy-chain network). We also had problems with the wires pulling out of the Apple adapters, until I discovered some plastic clamps that fit around the adpters.
 


... We also had problems with the wires pulling out of the Apple adapters, until I discovered some plastic clamps that fit around the adapters.
I recall buying some of those. I also made a kludge with tie wraps. Two went around each cable's strain relief on the connector. Two more locked the first two together. That stopped them from being accidentally unplugged. But when a foot or chair caught a cable on the ground it got tugged very hard and sometimes got ruined. PhoneNet, and later BaseT Ethernet, were game-changers. Phone cords have always been cheap.
 


I recall buying some of those. I also made a kludge with tie wraps. Two went around each cable's strain relief on the connector. Two more locked the first two together. That stopped them from being accidentally unplugged. But when a foot or chair caught a cable on the ground it got tugged very hard and sometimes got ruined. PhoneNet, and later BaseT Ethernet, were game-changers. Phone cords have always been cheap.
Heh. At Princeton U., we had the vampire taps (use orange tool with basically a broken drill bit on the end, set to a depth to reach the conductor of the ethernet backbone) and Cabletron AUI transceivers. We used to joke that some engineer from Princeton designed that vulnerable slide-lock on the AUI cable-to-transceiver. And you reminded me of the "wire tie lasso" I devised to secure the cable to the transceiver.
Then there were the troublesome "ThinNet, a.k.a. 10Base2" terminators. Nothing more than a resistor in a BNC plug. Speaking of resistors, Phonenet had them in an RJ11mod connector. You had to terminate that 2nd jack or else Appletalk would have problems.

Folks, RJ45 connectors are so much better than what we had 30 years ago....
 
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... Once I installed PhoneNet our network problems nearly vanished. I setup a Kinetics FastPath to link the Macs to our Ethernet network containing both Thick-Ethernet (10Base5) and Thin-Ethernet (10Base2). Cutting into the 10Base5 coax to add a vampire tap was a royal PITA. The FastPath enabled developers to telnet from their quiet offices into the noisy computer room containing a myriad of Unix based computers including Apollo Domain, Silicon Graphics, MASSCOMP, and Sun....
I was a hardware QA engineer for Farallon after they moved on from PhoneNet and were developing early fast and gig Ethernet cards and switches -- good times!
 
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While remembering, I created a network for my church consisting of three Mac Pluses, PhoneNet, and one hard disk hanging on one of the Mac Plus machines. We used MacServe to share that hard disk (32 MB for about $1,000 from Ehman Engineering) over PhoneNet. Compared to floppy disks, it was really fast. And we had an AppleTalk ImageWriter for printing.
 


All the talk of AAUI and 10BASE2 certainly triggers my nostalgia. Basically my first "real" job, while I was still in college, was to try and get the office's 10BASE2 network of about a dozen Macs spread across four rooms of an 80-year-old building connected with AAUI transceivers to stop flaking out.

What a nightmare that was--even after removing abandoned segments, pulling new cable through the attic, installing terminators, and checking every connection, segments would still flake out from time to time for absolutely no apparent reason. And of course being a daisy-chained network, you could never be entirely sure which segment was really the problem, nor whether what you did actually fixed it, or whatever randomness caused the problem just decided to stop causing it at that moment.

That was still an improvement, from what I hear, over the PhoneNet network that predated it, although the improvement may have been as much speed as reliability.

What a relief it was when modern 10BASE-T Ethernet finally became available. It wasn't fun stringing new cable through the attic, but you could tell which segment was to blame if there was a problem, and more importantly, you never actually had to, because it never had problems.

Though I admit, to this day I prefer the solid metal half-turn click of a BNC connector to RJ45 jacks and that tab that is basically designed to catch on everything it possibly can and break off at the slightest provocation. I mean, it's cheap and it works, but wasn't there some way we could have used something just a hair more robust and less snag-prone? EtherCON was one attempt, although it's too bulky to be practical in the modern era.
 


... What a nightmare that was--even after removing abandoned segments, pulling new cable through the attic, installing terminators, and checking every connection, segments would still flake out from time to time for absolutely no apparent reason.
I spent so much time in the ceilings of a University of Washington building I should have put in a cot. Serial/RS-232 cables ran from most rooms down to a Vax 11/780. For instrumentation there were thick 1" cables containing both analog coax and RS-232 style groups of wires.

The Vax 11/780 was retired within a couple of years of my arrivial in 1988, along with the thick cables and most of the RS-232 cables. When I went to pull 10Base2 to a computer lab, the cable trays going into the computer room were so full there was no space left. So I gutted the building of unused cables. There was at least a ton of cabling. It took a long run of coax to reach from the Cisco router in the basement to the lab on the first floor on the other side of the building.

I wired the lab with 10BaseT and used a converter from 10Base2 to 10BaseT. I left the job in 1993. Nobody has done any cable cleanup since. The telecommunications folks did rewire all the twisted pairs since they were originally from 1965.
 


My first exposure to Macs was in 1986. The company had a LocalTalk network linking over 30 Macs on three floors. The network went far beyond specifications for both cable length and the number of connectors. When it would crash (several times a week) I'd have to walk the building shutting down all Macs and then walk it again powering them back on.

Once I installed PhoneNet our network problems nearly vanished. I setup a Kinetics FastPath to link the Macs to our Ethernet network containing both Thick-Ethernet (10Base5) and Thin-Ethernet (10Base2). Cutting into the 10Base5 coax to add a vampire tap was a royal PITA. The FastPath enabled developers to telnet from their quiet offices into the noisy computer room containing a myriad of Unix based computers including Apollo Domain, Silicon Graphics, MASSCOMP, and Sun.

We were acquired by BBN, the developers of ARPANET, the predecessor to the Internet. They used some of their original equipment to hook us up to ARPANET. I've been on the Internet since 1987!
A year or so later we got our Macs at Princeton Plasma Physics Lab networked. We were an outlying building so the network crew was slow to respond to problems. Mac SEs in cubes were daisychained with PhoneNet and the offices had single drops. The end of the daisychains and the drops all disappeared into the phone closet. One day they left the door open and I found that the cables were all punched down into a panel that linked everything together into an unpowered star topology. No wonder everything went flopbott occasionally - especially in the offices with the longest runs. I found that if I unplugged unused lines folks would get their connection back and email and telnet into MFENET would work again like magic. And with that I became the Mac network guru, and that got me a job when my Aeronautical Engineering degree didn't...
 


Before that we had PhoneNet that used regular telephone wire.
...1986. The company had a LocalTalk network linking over 30 Macs on three floors....Once I installed PhoneNet our network problems nearly vanished.
Thanks for the memory jog. Ours was LocalTalk. I can't remember what the difference was between that and PhoneNet.
What a relief it was when modern 10BASE-T Ethernet finally became available. It wasn't fun stringing new cable through the attic, but you could tell which segment was to blame if there was a problem, and more importantly, you never actually had to, because it never had problems.
I remember how satisfying it was to switch from the old network to… AppleShareIP? Anyway, the first Apple TCP/IP networking using ethernet cables. It was soooo much better.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Ours was LocalTalk. I can't remember what the difference was between that and PhoneNet.
Different wiring and connectors - LocalTalk was the Apple local network stuff, while PhoneNet was the cheaper alternative from the folks across the bay, which worked with plain old telephone wires.
 



Different wiring and connectors - LocalTalk was the Apple local network stuff, while PhoneNet was the cheaper alternative from the folks across the bay, which worked with plain old telephone wires.
Yes, but PhoneNet not only worked better, but was much more versatile, allowing star configurations. I still have a couple of Farallon PhoneNet connectors, along with a Mac Plus (which should be in good working condition).

At KLM's headquarters in the Netherlands during the '90s, we eventually operated a quite complex AppleTalk infrastructure, using the company's TokenRing backbone and multiple Mac II's acting as routers. Back then, LocalTalk was called 'AppleTalk Phase 1' and Apple had released EtherTalk, TokenTalk and the Apple Internet Router software as part of AppleTalk Phase 2. It worked very well; the TokenRing was reasonably stable, but for workstations way too expensive. So we switched the high-end Mac IIcx to 10BASE-T, all running over ICS (IBM Cabling System, another very expensive component).

We were even allowing people to dial in from home using Apple Remote Access and connecting to the company's mainframe computer using the ALC and 3270 gateways from InnoSys and Avatar, respectively. Even Apple had a 3270 gateway at one point (FYI the 3270 protocol allowed users to log on to a IBM 370 mainframe and do all sorts of text-based terminal work, like the reservation system, DB2 and SAS).

The only disadvantage was AppleTalk being very 'chatty' as the routing information was propagated throughout the WAN. The 'real network people' (a.k.a. the IT department) were not so enthousiastic, because they had only limited control and suffered from a tiny 'not invented here syndrome'. But when Microsoft realesed their Macintosh Mail platform, email really took off and the DOS guys were really envious at that time.

This was all just before the Internet became the de-facto WAN standard, although I remember that in the early days, we could run AppleTalk over IP using a tunneling protocol.

Yeah, exciting times... I still have the Inside AppleTalk bible, 2nd ed. by Gurshuran Sidhu, one of the networking architects at Apple at that time. Smart guys! And the excellent MacWorld Networking Handbook (1992) by David Kosiur and Nancy Jones. Still makes nice reading stuff.
 
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The only disadvantage was AppleTalk being very 'chatty' as the routing information was propagated throughout the WAN
That seems to be a common attribute of networking protocols at the time. I know that the Microsoft/IBM LAN Manager protocol (a very early version of SMB running over NetBIOS) was also extremely chatty and IT departments didn't like it either.
 


The other advantage of PhoneNet was, its cables would never be confused with ADB cables. It was hard sometimes to figure out which was an ADB extension vs an Appletalk cable.
 


Ahh... PhoneNet! In a previous life I was the IT guy for a manufacturer in Juarez. We had two buildings across the street from one another. I had written some HyperCard stacks that would do intra-office communication, including file transfers (and this was before most folks were using email).

We needed to get both buildings connected, and, as this was Mexico and you just needed to know to whom to give "the little envelope", so to speak, we managed to close down half of the road between our buildings, dig a trench, lay some PVC pipe, and repeat the process with the other side of the street a few days later. Then we pushed some phone wire through the pipe and, presto, we had both buildings connected.

We never had a problem... until a power cable broke from the pole outside the building, hit the fence surrounding our building, and sent a high-voltage charge to earth. The two devices at either end of the wire crossing under the street were damaged; the two PhoneNet boxes exploded, and the ports on the two Macs were fried. Hey! That was no problem as I grabbed a couple of PhoneNet boxes from a cabinet and switched serial ports on the two Mac LCs. Would you believe the phone wire was still good, and, except for those two Macs, nothing else was damaged.

If I were there today, I'd use Pringle can antennas to WiFi the buildings together. :D
 



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