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So it's less that it was actually ever pronounced "sexy" than that it was supposed to be but never was. I certainly know which one feels more appropriate.
I only heard it pronounced "sexy" once, by a Mac advocate who was trying to use it as a reason why Macs are better than PCs back in the late 80's.
 


The most memorable SCSI device for me:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CkG_l8VaKDM​

The Seagate Elite 23. This was huuuuuuge in 1996, I deployed 6 of them at work for a Mac-hosted (Power Mac 8500/150) near-line storage system.
 


Thanks for the tips. The older PowerPC has Ethernet port on back. But I'm afraid the hard drive isn't booting (Mac face is all I get). I no longer have any "disk doctor" or first aid floppies. If I can get a SCSI chassis, I will go with Charlap's suggestion that the G3 does have an external SCSI connection (oh, the ID and termination memories come back). But now I need to make sure the drive is either bootable or accessible via a SCSI chassis. Might put the USB Sonnet card in the G3, format a USB drive for HFS+, then put it back in the Power Mac to read the drive. Also, I may reach out to a few former clients if they still are hoarding old Apple stuff (Iomega drive, etc.).
 


The Seagate Elite 23. This was huuuuuuge in 1996, I deployed 6 of them at work for a Mac-hosted (Power Mac 8500/150) near-line storage system.
The Elite 23 was in a standard full-height 5.25" form factor. This was very popular in the 80's, because platter density wasn't high enough to get high capacity in a half-height drive. I remember, for example, Seagate's ST-4096 was an incredibly popular 80MB drive until it was replaced with the half-height ST-296N.
 




Not mentioned in the article is that (at least throughout the 80's and 90's), Clarus was the official mascot of Apple Developer Technical Support (which evolved into the current developer program). Which is why she appeared all over developer materials (documentation, sample code, etc.) at the time.

Macworld said:
We miss you, Clarus the dogcow
But still, that nostalgia persists for us old-timers. Take Clarus, the dogcow, for example. This was a bitmap glyph originally created by Susan Kare for the Cairo dingbat font that came with the original Mac in 1984. But Clarus broke out to become an official mascot of Apple’s Developer Technical Support, and an unofficial symbol of the Mac for the rest of us.
 


Clarus even made a few appearances in the main UI of the (somewhat obscure?) e-mail client POPmail II version 2.2 by Dave Johnson of the University of Minnesota. Anyone besides me ever use that?

I recall that it even supported POP2 in addition to POP3. I've been curious to find out more information about that, specifically in the context of how it differs from its more modern sibling, but surprisingly little information is available to make that comparison.
 


Does anyone remember the time when the original Microsoft Word exceeded the space of one 3.5" floppy disk when included with the Mac OS? I remember seeing many posts about how 'inefficient' the code was and now required the infamous disk swapping to use Word. This would have been circa 1992-1993.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Does anyone remember the time when the original Microsoft Word exceeded the space of one 3.5" floppy disk when included with the Mac OS? I remember seeing many posts about how 'inefficient' the code was and now required the infamous disk swapping to use Word. This would have been circa 1992-1993.
I'll never forget the experience of trying to backup the system discs on a new 128K Mac... and the countless floppy swaps involved.
 


I'll never forget the experience of trying to backup the system discs on a new 128K Mac... and the countless floppy swaps involved.
Am I the only person who insisted from day-one on buying computers with two floppy drives, specifically because of this?

My Apple II systems always had two drives (my IIGS has four - 2 5.25" and 2 3.5") and my first Mac (an SE) had two floppies in addition to a hard drive. Ditto for my first PCs, which had two floppies (later 4 - 2 of each size) in addition to whatever hard drives there may or may not have been. I only started getting systems with a single floppy drive after hard drives got big enough that there was always room to use one as a buffer when duplicating floppies.

Was I that unusual?
 



The external floppy drives weren't available initially, but I certainly bought one when they arrived, before hard drives became available. (I'd check the price, but the Multiplan spreadsheet doesn't open on my current Mac.... Wikipedia says it was $495.)
I don't remember if I bought an external floppy with my 512K or shortly afterwards, but I considered it a must; swapping floppies could drive me batty. At some point after I got a hard drive (or had replaced the 512K) I sold the external floppy drive for $25 to a local kid named Andy Ihnatko.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I don't remember if I bought an external floppy with my 512K or shortly afterwards, but I considered it a must; swapping floppies could drive me batty. At some point after I got a hard drive (or had replaced the 512K) I sold the external floppy drive for $25 to a local kid named Andy Ihnatko.
Did you buy it at Sherman Howe?
 


The external floppy drives weren't available initially, but I certainly bought one when they arrived, before hard drives became available. (I'd check the price, but the Multiplan spreadsheet doesn't open on my current Mac.... Wikipedia says it was $495.)
In 1982, I had saved up enough to upgrade my Radio Shack TRS-80 Model III from the cassette "storage" to a floppy drive (5-1/4"). The upgrade also required upgrading the RAM from 16K to 48K. The total cost was around $1000 (lots of odd jobs and lawn work in my last two summers of high school). I recall that I was the only freshman in any of my classes who turned in word-processed, mint condition essays and term papers. WordStar and CP/M...

My first Mac (SE) didn't manifest itself until 1986, after I had moved on to an Apple II (plus?), Osborne with external 12" amber monitor, and an HP touchscreen PC...
 


Did you buy it at Sherman Howe?
I may have bought something at Sherman Howe; the name sounds familiar, and I think there were in Newton, but I can't remember what.

Nor do I remember the name of the dealer from whom I bought my first Mac in 1985. I believe it was from a local dealer exhibiting at the Boston MacWorld show that year. What I do remember that they didn't charge my credit card for well over a year, until I got a call one day from the bankruptcy trustee for the company, asked if I had bought a computer from the by-then defunct company. I admitted I had and paid up.
 



Yep, in a little building right where 30 crosses the Pike. Those were the days! $7K for our LaserWriter. Ouch.
That was the place; it's less than a mile from my house. When I finally paid for the 512K, the AppleWriter dot-matrix printer, and a few other things, it came to $3K. Then there was $500 for the 1200-baud modem, which took a long time to come from someplace in Connecticut but eventually became a lifeline to filing news stories to magazines in Britain and the US.
 



I don't remember if I bought an external floppy with my 512K or shortly afterwards, but I considered it a must; swapping floppies could drive me batty. At some point after I got a hard drive (or had replaced the 512K) I sold the external floppy drive for $25 to a local kid named Andy Ihnatko.
My company's first hardware purchase was an external 800K floppy disk drive for my Mac Plus. Stopping constant floppy disk changes was a great productivity improvement.
 


The external floppy drives weren't available initially, but I certainly bought one when they arrived, before hard drives became available. (I'd check the price, but the Multiplan spreadsheet doesn't open on my current Mac.... Wikipedia says it was $495.)
When I bought my Mac 512 in Nov 1985, I bought an external floppy drive at the same time. The store, Macy's, also through in a free copy of Pagemaker.
 





That's exactly what I did, and it was a wonderful, reliable drive, with Dave Winzler's outstanding backup software, too.
Thanks for sharing about the HyperDrive. I'm glad there was a video of it, and I wish there were one for the MacBottom too!

It's one of those things that you can read about, but seeing it in action really (at the risk of a bad pun that I can't resist) drives home the ingenuity of the day.

My own personal Mac experience starts with the SE in 1987, when SCSI was already the standard for external hard drives. It's a real treat to be able to see how we "got there."

I do have an HD 20, but those were fairly similar to the modern experience, apart from having to load the driver from a floppy disk! ;)
 




The killer upgrade for early Macs was the GCC HyperDrive, which was one of the most brilliant hacks ever. Unfortunately, the drives they used (Micropolis, if I recall correctly) were defective, and I've been obsessive about backup ever since....
According to the video, the drive used is made by MMI and is model M112. The CSC Hard Drive Bible lists it on page 132. (BTW, this book is a great reference for the entire history of storage devices up to 1994 when it was published.)

Micropolis was a different brand and, back in the day, was known for being a pretty high quality manufacturer.
 


Wow! What a 'memory lane' discussion! I'm tempted to peek inside my old Lisa/Mac XL box to ensure it's still there. Still have the old Lisa documentation and external 5MB hard drive.
 


Micropolis was a different brand and, back in the day, was known for being a pretty high quality manufacturer.
if I recall correctly I had a 9GB 3.5" Micropolis "A/V" Wide SCSI HD in what we would consider the standard form factor today (1/3 height). I think I bought it off some guys that were at a big swapfest in Minneapolis (an annual affair for me for a few years) in the mid 90's and always had what I'm thinking were pre-release or developer sample hard drives for sale, cheaper than street. And then there was Pro-Direct, they seemed to operate off a similar source for drives in the same time-frame.
 


... Micropolis "A/V" Wide SCSI HD ...
That "A/V" feature probably made it a very expensive drive.

At the time, hard drives would have to go through "thermal calibration" from time to time, in order to tweak settings (like head-positioning logic) to compensate for temperature changes (e.g. platters expanding and contracting).

A typical hard drive would pause all operation during thermal calibration. It didn't take a long time and wouldn't affect normal usage. But when recording audio or video, it could be catastrophic.

Remember that this was in the day before cheap RAM. Computers wouldn't have large caches, and drives would have minimal (if any) buffers. A drive pausing while recording a stream of audio could easily result in buffer overruns and lost data - ruining the recording.

An A/V drive had special firmware to detect when recording streams of data and would deliberately delay thermal calibration until a pause/stop in the recording. I think they also had buffers to minimize the impact of calibration, should it become necessary to perform it while recording.

Modern hard drives are much more stable and don't need to perform thermal calibration, and even if it is necessary, both drives and computers have very large amounts of RAM that can be used as buffers. So you no longer see anyone marketing "A/V" drives.
 


I bought an Imation SuperDisk USB drive to go with my Bondi Blue iBook in 1999. I have actually used it in this decade to retrieve some files off a floppy that was floating around without any labels. I did have to use the iBook for the Classic Mac OS system, so I could actually see the files.
 


The killer upgrade for early Macs was the GCC HyperDrive, which was one of the most brilliant hacks ever. Unfortunately, the drives they used (Micropolis, if I recall correctly) were defective, and I've been obsessive about backup ever since....
I had one of those! I don't remember if I had to install it myself, but I do remember that when I became a beta-tester for Harvard Nephrology Professor Burton (Bud) Rose's "UpToDate", the quarterly updates shipped on a stack of 3.5 inch floppies, and transferring those to my "huge" 5- (or maybe 10-megabyte) HyperDrive made life tolerable by eliminating the "floppy shuffle" that also was necessary to load many early Mac programs. I also remember either snipping a lead on a resistor on the motherboard or soldering something to increase the RAM of an early Mac (I think it might have been a Mac Plus, but don't remember for certain).
 


A long, long time ago, just after I got out of college, I worked for a (now defunct) Mac utility developer. Several of the machines in the office were Mac Pluses with SCSI MacBottoms. The rule in the office was to never, ever turn the MacBottoms off, even over weekends.

If they were turned off, they didn't like to start up again. If they did get stuck, the best way to get them going was to disconnect them from the Mac, turn the power on, carefully pick them up and then give them a sharp twist like turning a balky steering wheel.

If you were lucky, the heads would lift off and the drive would be fine.

If you were unlucky... well.
 


I also remember either snipping a lead on a resistor on the motherboard or soldering something to increase the RAM of an early Mac (I think it might have been a Mac Plus, but don't remember for certain).
The Plus had resistors on the board to configure it for 1M (four 256K SIMMs), 2.5M (two 1M and two 256K SIMMs) or 4M (four 1M SIMMs) of RAM. Upgrading the memory required cutting away one of the resistors. Downgrading back to 1M required re-soldering it to the board.

Early model SEs had a similar system. Later SEs had jumpers, making it easier to upgrade RAM.

See also the Apple Memory Guide, pages 4-6.
 


I bought an Imation SuperDisk USB drive to go with my Bondi Blue iBook in 1999. I have actually used it in this decade to retrieve some files off a floppy that was floating around without any labels. I did have to use the iBook for the Classic Mac OS system, so I could actually see the files.
If only there were a way to read 800K floppies, which seems to be impossible, due to their variable-speed encoding.
 


The rule in the office was to never, ever turn the MacBottoms off, even over weekends.

If they were turned off, they didn't like to start up again. If they did get stuck, the best way to get them going was to disconnect them from the Mac, turn the power on, carefully pick them up and then give them a sharp twist like turning a balky steering wheel.
Sounds like a case of stiction which was problem that commonly occurred on hard drives from the 80's and early 90's. Percussive maintenance was a common, if not completely safe, workaround.
 



And, perhaps an even greater hack than the HyperDrive, the IWM (Integrated Woz Machine) floppy controller packed extra data into the floppy while using very few parts.
Ah yes. I forgot about that ingenious bit of hardware. I wonder if the Amiga later used something similar to get 880K on a disk? There's a platform I wish I'd gotten to play with. But my only Commodore experience is limited to the 64c (my first computer) and the 128, which one of my science teachers from high school gave me years later. I now have neither, apart from some floppies.
 


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