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Just a word of warning to others: I purchased PDFpen from Apple's Mac App Store after trying a demo, because I had a business-critical IRS form I had to fill out, and Apple Preview couldn't do the job. Unfortunately, PDFpen was a disaster, failing to even save changes/files correctly. I tried to get a refund from Apple's Mac App Store, but Apple refused to refund the purchase (which makes me extremely wary of buying any software again from Apple).
The exact scenario happened to me years ago when PDFPenPro was new. I tried it out, all looked good, at about page 11 (as I recall) of a corporate tax return, I watched as everything I had added to the form appeared (quite literally) to just slide off the screen much as decals that were too wet would slide off the models I built as a kid.

The folks at PDFPen (Smile) refunded my purchase and, as a bonus, let me keep a license for their software. Not that I ever used it again. What bothered me most in my conversation with them was my belief they knew of the problem. Why, then, didn't they advise against using their software for the common-enough purpose of filling in forms created with Adobe's Acrobat?

One comment I recall. Preview had (and still has) the same issue, and I believe PDFPen was using (and is probably still using) whatever "engine" is built into macOS to power Preview's handling of PDFs.

We've had several versions of Acrobat Pro at work. I've used it to create our own forms that we posted online that would then auto-generate emails to us with just the tiny amount of data which users added as they completed the forms. That data auto-filled the same forms in our office, which were then completed PDFs ready for review. Slick, but as Acrobat was a moving target, becoming ever more expensive with new versions, it was not cost effective to continue.
The problem with the tax form does appear to be the IRS using Adobe LiveCycle Designer to create their PDF
Had not heard of LiveCycle Designer. Read about it. Seems a way for Adobe to extend the PDF format it created but didn't try to control.

Found this related document, which is, ironically a PDF:
Middle Georgia State University said:
Converting a LiveCycle PDF to an Adobe PDF.
LiveCycle is no longer a recommend way to create or edit PDFs, it requires additional software that may not be available and these PDFs may not display correctly on the University website -
 


The exact scenario happened to me years ago when PDFPenPro was new. I tried it out, all looked good, at about page 11 (as I recall) of a corporate tax return, I watched as everything I had added to the form appeared (quite literally) to just slide off the screen much as decals that were too wet would slide off the models I built as a kid.
Smile Software (PDFPen) and I have a love/hate relationship. It works most of the time but of course never when I have a deadline. They are very good at replying to trouble reports, and they actually take the time to try to reproduce a problem -- even on your PDF if you will send it to them. My last problem was that I could not select a box of text, no matter how I tried. The problem turned out to be a corrupted font in Mojave – a font that wasn't even in the document.

And that lead me to use FontBook to discover that 1/4 of my fonts were bad, and a further deep dive let me know that over half were Postscript Type 1 (antique and barely supported). I let FontBook restore my font folder, and PDFPen worked.

Unfortunately I also had to spend $500 replacing a bunch of fonts that I use on a day to day basis and probably have another $1,000-2,000 to go to replace the lightly-used ones.
 


Unfortunately I also had to spend $500 replacing a bunch of fonts that I use on a day to day basis and probably have another $1,000-2,000 to go to replace the lightly-used ones.
A possible cheaper solution might be something like FontXChange from FontGear. So far, I have had success with converting old Type 1. I have quite a bit more I haven't gotten to though.
 


A possible cheaper solution might be something like FontXChange from FontGear. So far, I have had success with converting old Type 1. I have quite a bit more I haven't gotten to though.
Thanks, Will. FontXChange was my go-to for many years, but I can't get it to run on Mojave. Every time it's started it asks to install components, and every time I try to add a font, it crashes. And even if it did work, converted fonts are missing several characters which didn't exist during the Postscript 1 era, like the Euro symbol.
 


Thanks, Will. FontXChange was my go-to for many years, but I can't get it to run on Mojave. Every time it's started it asks to install components, and every time I try to add a font, it crashes. And even if it did work, converted fonts are missing several characters which didn't exist during the Postscript 1 era, like the Euro symbol.
Seems to be working fine under Mojave here - FontXChange 5.3 and Mojave 10.14.6 (18G3020). I just converted an old CD of fonts ("Bitstream 500" circa 1994) that came in Windows Postscript and TrueType. Both formats converted to OpenType with no obvious issues. They all previewed fine in FontExplorer.

The component installation seems configurable in settings.
 


Seems to be working fine under Mojave here - FontXChange 5.3 and Mojave 10.14.6 (18G3020). I just converted an old CD of fonts ("Bitstream 500" circa 1994) that came in Windows Postscript and TrueType. Both formats converted to OpenType with no obvious issues. They all previewed fine in FontExplorer. The component installation seems configurable in settings.
I also used FontXChange to convert my 8,000+ font library (PostScript and TrueType) to OpenType with minimal problem, if I remember correctly. This was back in 2011 when FontXChange was still at version 2.1. I can imagine that the software has only gotten better since.
 


I want to thank everyone who posted about FontXChange. I have been having instability issues with my computer (now running Mojave) since at least macOS Sierra. It got so bad I upgraded from a MacBook Pro Retina mid 2012 to a 2018 Mac Mini, which helped a little, but I still had some instability – random crashes, restarts, and an inability to install updates without unplugging everything but the monitor and installing a delta update. I put it down to various 3rd-party apps getting in each others' way, but never took the time to try and pin it down, since I like all those 3rd-party apps and utilities.

Well, I did notice that I had some very old Type 2 fonts which are loaded by FontAgent. I decided to fix everything with FontXChange, which took a bit of doing with over 2,000 fonts. After all was said and done, my Mini seemed a little bit snappier, but more to the point, I was able to do the next system update with no problem, and my computer didn't spontaneously shut down (when that would happen, I would have to do a safe boot to get everything back up and running again).

What a dunce! I should have done this years ago. Now, a few weeks after I did this, my computer is rock-solid and hasn't frozen or shut down since. Thank you again, Kathryn, Will, Tony, and FontGear!
 


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