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The Kansas City metro area has a few providers, including Google Fiber, which is not available in the weird little overlap of municipalities where I live in Kansas. The big competitors are AT&T (including Uverse and Dish), Spectrum, Comcast Xfinity, and Cox. Cell phone-wise, we have all the big players and some of the little MVNOs, too.

I don't like being tied to one company for all my services, and I worry that MVNOs like Ting won't have enough coverage.

I'm on T-Mobile here in Kansas City on a legacy plan with 5 phone lines, unlimited text and talk, 2GB of 4g data per phone, unlimited 3g data. Roughly $135 per month, taxes & fees included. This was T-Mobile's old Simple Choice North America Plan: Unlimited Talk + Text -
$80 for two lines, $20 second line, $10 every other line plan. My kids have only gone over the 2GB data a few times, and it was right before a new billing cycle. Most of the time, the kids have WiFi anyway (home, school, the library, Starbucks, friends' houses) and don't do too much on their phones besides texting and YouTube. I have a daughter away at college who even does most of her calling over WiFi now, because her dorm is in a low spot on campus and she can't always get a good cell signal in her room.

We also still have a land line, but it's UVerse (we still have a gradeschooler who doesn't need a smartphone). We opt for the Internet & Phone plan, no cable or DishTV included, and pay about $80 a month for both "unlimited internet" (100 GB of data) and unlimited local/long distance phone. This was a promotional bundle that's set to expire next year, so I'm getting prepared to haggle and jump ship if need be.

I also keep an old Tracfone flip-phone around that I throw a service plan on every few months to keep it alive, so my grade schooler can carry it around when we drop him off at practices and music lessons or goes to his friend's house. Maybe $20 every three or four months? I just buy the scratch-off cards at the grocery store for that.

So, I'm paying roughly $215-ish for monthly services, not including the flip phone.
 


I worry that MVNOs like Ting won't have enough coverage.
They have the same coverage as the company they're reselling, usually. I've never had an issue with Ting that wasn't experienced by normal Sprint users. (Ting also uses another company, I think it's AT&T, now.)
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
They have the same coverage as the company they're reselling, usually. I've never had an issue with Ting that wasn't experienced by normal Sprint users.
I don't know if this applies to "roaming" areas, where the host company and the MVNO may differ (or not, I'm not sure).
 


While the final say is required by the FCC, there has been some movement at the state level in regards to modernization of this infrastructure and the phasing out of POTS access. Illinois is one such state which has already passed legislation.
I worked for phone companies in the Northwest for 24+ years, What you should do is call the local phone company. One local land line might be less than $100. Verizon can charge for bundles because they are not a phone company only. They have contracts that do phone, TV and Internet. As you experienced, it is not as simple to buy just phone service. So see if the local company is in your area. Here in Seattle and 14 other states, the company is CenturyLink. Even they are selling bundles, but I believe they can also sell you phone service separately at an affordable cost.
 


While the final say is required by the FCC, there has been some movement at the state level in regards to modernization of this infrastructure and the phasing out of POTS access. Illinois is one such state which has already passed legislation.
In some areas, such as Texas, Verizon got rid our their copper lines by selling them to Frontier. Frontier seems to think that copper wiring has considerable value. I would at least think that the existing copper wiring from the road or alley to the house has value. I believe, in Missoula, Century Link was running fiber down the alley in a really nice neighborhood but hey ran DSL on the existing copper wiring from the alley into the house, thus avoiding digging up the yard and bushes. I do note that the utility often buries the fiber just below the roots of the grass and thus the installation of fiber might not be terribly disruptive, but I guess you might have patios and sidewalks in the way. You can have fairly high data rates using DSL over short distances. This system might be useful when supplying rural homes where you would would run fiber in the road ditch and then run DSL to the house.

In my case, I am getting 13 Mbps over two DSL streams on different phone pairs added together at the modem from the central office that is about 4 1/2 miles away.
 


We live in St. Louis, and switched from POTS to ATT Uverse when they made us an offer we couldn't refuse: $73/month (including taxes and fees) for unlimited VoIP "landline" and 6 Mbps internet, which actually tests at 7.5. I negotiated free hardware as well. That's less than we'd been paying for POTS and 3 Mbps DSL. Every year I call ATT before the deal expires, and so far, every time they've extended my pricing for another year without drama.

ATT obviously wants to get out from under POTS, which is fine with me. Uverse VoIP has been solid, with excellent voice quality. 7.5 Mbps is more than enough bandwidth to stream two different HD movies simultaneously.
 


I find it strange there are no "senior/AARP" discounts on communications. Had a quote from Verizon that is $39 for 100/100 (BYOR: Bring your own router) but only with phone for $29, so that is $60/month plus fees/taxes (likely over $70).

I have a parent we want to monitor/FaceTime with, and allow to watch YouTube (so much to watch/learn from), etc. So $70/month isn't too unrealistic (in my opinion, FiOS has been reliable) - by the way, that is 2-year contract.

Tip: If you have no need for TV, tell FIOS to provision the ONT for Cat5/ethernet and not MOCA. Then you can use your own router (I am going with Netgear Orbi).
 



If you have no need for TV, tell FIOS to provision the ONT for Cat5/ethernet and not MOCA. Then you can use your own router (I am going with Netgear Orbi).
Alternatively (e.g. if your ONT is outdoors and you don't want to pull Ethernet cabling through your walls), you can use MoCA along with a MoCA bridge to convert its signal to Ethernet where it connects to your router.

DSL Reports has a FiOS FAQ that talks about this and mentions several different MoCA bridges known to be compatible with FiOS.
 


Have you guys tried the VOIP service, Ooma? I've had it for over 5 years. You buy a small unit for about $99 to connect to your internet line, and plug your phone (or wireless base unit) into the box. Port your landline number.

The base service is included; the premier service includes two lines and a bunch of useful services, including ringing your cell, home, and an app for calling using the phone, worldwide. It is dramatically cheaper per month than what the phone companies charge. And you can take your base unit with you when you move...
 



FiOS business Internet costs $100/mo. here, while Verizon Wireless is $60/mo. for one line and Consumer Cellular is $74/mo. for two lines.
I live in Eugene, OR, and in most of our city, the only possible internet, business or home, is Comcast. For business, we pay about $160/month, with static IP and all taxes and fees included.

My office is approx 1 mile from the heart of downtown, in a business district, and the traditional landline carrier, Centurylink, offers only DSL.
 


Another cheap VoIP option is Voip.ms. You pay $0.40 to setup, and $0.85 per month for your phone number. Then, you only pay about $0.01 per minute for incoming and outgoing calls.

You just need to provide your own VoIP equipment. ATA's can be obtained cheaply, like a Cisco SPA112 for $30 on Amazon or less on eBay. You can also use SIP softphones so you can access the service on your smartphone or computer.

For anyone who is still paying $20-25 per month for landline POTS service, unless you have some absolute need to have telephone service during a power outage, I don't know why you wouldn't switch to a cheap VoIP provider like Ooma, Voip.ms, or Magic Jack. The rates are so much cheaper and the features are so much greater.
 


I'm just about 4 miles out from my local central office and have Frontier for both a POTS line and companion DSL service. My line was conditioned for working DSL more than 10 years ago, and recently water breached one of the boxes along the route up on a pole. Instead of remedying the connection issue at the box, the line tech moved me to a different copper pair. Guess what? My DSL no longer works!

The follies of trying to explain this to the Frontier line tech, initiating yet another service request and having their tech call my home number instead of my alternate contact number (we all work, right?) has led to unbelieveable frustration, not to mention multiple days without working internet!

I'm trying to avoid getting in bed with Comcast, but I don't know if I'll ever find somebody at Frontier who "gets it" and will actually, successfully fix this.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
For anyone who is still paying $20-25 per month for landline POTS service, unless you have some absolute need to have telephone service during a power outage, I don't know why you wouldn't switch to a cheap VoIP provider like Ooma, Voip.ms, or Magic Jack. The rates are so much cheaper and the features are so much greater.
Thanks for the good info, and I'll just note that you have to provide Internet access for these phones to work, which presumably costs something in addition to their up-front, VoIP and tax/fee costs.
 


I'm a happy Google Voice user since their beta. We have several lines. Can't beat the price: free (no taxes).
 


Another cheap VoIP option is Voip.ms. You pay $0.40 to setup, and $0.85 per month for your phone number. Then, you only pay about $0.01 per minute for incoming and outgoing calls.
You just need to provide your own VoIP equipment. ATA's can be obtained cheaply, like a Cisco SPA112 for $30 on Amazon or less on eBay. You can also use SIP softphones so you can access the service on your smartphone or computer.
For anyone who is still paying $20-25 per month for landline POTS service, unless you have some absolute need to have telephone service during a power outage, I don't know why you wouldn't switch to a cheap VoIP provider like Ooma, Voip.ms, or Magic Jack. The rates are so much cheaper and the features are so much greater.
I can recommend VoIP.ms also. I have used them for 3 years. No issues. The major thing I love about them is the control that they give you over your phone setup. You can use a voice recording and direct people to individual voice mail boxes, send all phone calls to voice mail unless they are in your phone book, block anonymous calls, use SMS with your standard VOIP phone numbers, etc. etc. All this is included in the basic cost of the service. They have an excellent wiki that explains how to do everything in detail, and, if you get stuck, they have support that responds well. We have two lines, and our average cost per month is $4-$5 (for both lines) - this includes all the fees and usage charges.
 


Consumer Cellular was particularly AARP-discount-friendly, last time I checked.
I can confirm this is still true.

Also, if one chooses the AT&T network (T-Mobile being the other option) I read somewhere (can't remember where) that Consumer Cellular AT&T customers are on AT&T's postpaid network, while other AT&T MVNO's only have access to AT&T's more limited prepaid network. I have no idea if it's actually true, but FWIW...
 


Some landline services allow one to create a step to make the call go through. The step could be press 1 to make the call go through. That is an effective way of blocking robocalls which will also block pharmacy ‘your subscription is ready’ calls. Our telephone cooperative blocks spam calls on our land line at the central office.
This robocall blocker has saved countless dinners at my house:

 


DFG

Here in the Bay Area, an AT&T/Comcast duopoly:
  • Comcast Xfinity cable internet (70/6): $50/mo. (long-term contract)
  • Ooma phone service: $6/mo (+ hardware cost)
  • Consumer Cellular (2 lines, unlimited calls and texts, 3 GB data no special discount): $63/mo
  • VPN (for streaming videos): $4/mo (one year contract)
 


the old landline wires would never be repaired. ... Verizon is apparently not interested in wiring smaller, older buildings like ours (in NYC) for FIOS ...
Copper quality for voice connections is still fabulous on my Brooklyn block. In the North Slope the 1950s copper plant was great when I got a landline in 1983. By the mid-1990s age, ultraviolet radiation, rain water, and squirrels caused outages. By the late 1990s Verizon began aggressively disinvesting from its Brooklyn landline services. Linemen explained they no longer replaced older cable that had gone bad. Instead, they "bonded" failed lines onto working lines, or temporarily bridged gaps with high-voltage currents. After concatenating block neighbors' complaints, the NYS PSC ordered Verizon to replace the rear yard copper in early 2010.

For FIOS, Verizon has wired all the single-family townhouses, but refuses to wire the same townhouses divided into apartments. FIOS cable runs between poles on the edge of my building's rear yard. A six foot step ladder is all that's needed to reach the FIOS cable.
 


Ooma has one advantage: my alarm monitoring company rates it as the only VOIP service compatible with their system. They do accept most of the cable VOIP systems, e.g. FIOS or Optimum/Cablevision/Altice.

Regarding Tracfone, you may want to look at moving to T-Mobile. We have a spare Motorola flip-phone and they have a minimum $10/year, once you've spent $100 on the account. Generally, even when I used the phone regularly, that worked out to around $20-$50 per year, after that first year when we spent the aforementioned $100. The service is pretty good with the Motorola, which seems to have better reception than the iPhones.

Re Walter Dufresne’s complaints... Verizon’s not a nice company. If they were, then while they were recording huge profits, they wouldn’t have kept trying to “break” their union—thousands of hardworking employees with years of good service under their belt (okay, that was in New Jersey; I don’t know about the New York or New England people). Nor would they leave connections unrepaired — as far as I can tell, just to spite the “regulated” people.
 



I worked for phone companies in the Northwest for 24+ years, What you should do is call the local phone company. ... . So see if the local company is in your area. Here in Seattle and 14 other states, the company is CenturyLink. ... .
You now need a multilayered flow chart, but Verizon is a descendant of pre-breakup AT&T

CenturyLink descends from US West (a regional Bell), and Verizon descends from NYNEX (the regional in the MA area).... One major issue has turned out to be that most of the "local phone companies" now also have mutli-billion dollar cellular business, which clamors for another set of multi-billion infrastructure investments.

In areas where Verizon and AT&T have rolled out fiber ,they tend to want to get rid of the copper option, so "plain" phone service is all digital (over IP). In these areas, "just phone" has a precondition that it is an addition to Internet services. (Fiber is also an expensive infrastructure investment that also turns into a focus point for those companies.) The cellular system is going to all voice over IP also.

I suspect it might have worked out better if the "phone wire" folks had not been allowed to get into the celluar business. And the cable folks, too. All three methods competing but required to interoperate to move data across networks probably would be better than what we have. If "phone wire" Verizon could only get to customers via a wire, then they would not be as eager to cut off all the wires (e.g., could have put more investment into fiber than into cellular network infrastructure). On the flip side, we'd probably not have the broad, free-roaming networks we do have now. (Coherent national oversight is spotty. Left to well protected niches, regional Bells could have stagnated (just milked the cash cow harder), the celluar biz could have consolidated into just one (given the same oversight that allowed ATT to reform), etc.)

Classic copper POTS wire with classic DSL bandwidth issues is basically dead infrastructure walking at this point. It isn't whether it is dying, it is more a matter of how fast. (It won't be an even death rate everywhere. Local drivers in some places will make it go faster than others. )
 


... For anyone who is still paying $20-25 per month for landline POTS service, unless you have some absolute need to have telephone service during a power outage, I don't know why you wouldn't switch to a cheap VoIP provider like Ooma, Voip.ms, or Magic Jack. The rates are so much cheaper and the features are so much greater.
Which is a contributing reason why the POTS lines are dying off. The more folks who jump off of the classic POTS wires, the less viable the infrastructure becomes. If almost everyone has a POTS line, then the infrastructure costs are spread out over almost the maximum number of people. As there are fewer folks paying for the same infrastructure over a very large area, it trends toward the unviable point.

Given that "local phone" companies own some of the 'exit' points (switching to cellphone or providing basic IP data connection), there is no perfect market dynamic that will get AT&T / Version / etc. to lower costs. If they can see that long term it will fail, they'll just leave the prices higher and ride for as long as they can.
 


Ooma has one advantage: my alarm monitoring company rates it as the only VOIP service compatible with their system. They do accept most of the cable VOIP systems, e.g. FIOS or Optimum/Cablevision/Altice.
That's good to hear. Do you have the Ooma placed behind your router, and if so, have you had to make any QoS adjustments? I haven't set mine up yet. They say putting the Ooma first will allow it to prioritize your phone calls and give the best quality, but I hesitate to do that; my router should handle network security.
 


That's good to hear. Do you have the Ooma placed behind your router, and if so, have you had to make any QoS adjustments? I haven't set mine up yet. They say putting the Ooma first will allow it to prioritize your phone calls and give the best quality, but I hesitate to do that; my router should handle network security.
I initially tried what they suggest (putting the Ooma box in front of the router), but that resulted in degraded performance for non-VOIP traffic. I moved it inside the firewall, and haven't looked back since. It's been working well this way for 8 years now.

I have a Linux server that is up 24/7, so I use that as my firewall. I have not made any QoS changes for Ooma.
 


I initially tried what they suggest (putting the Ooma box in front of the router), but that resulted in degraded performance for non-VOIP traffic.
Thanks, Dan, for answering my question.

After posting it, I got curious. I went to their site and downloaded their QuickStart guide. It seems they no longer recommend that the Ooma box go in front of the router, at least by default; they now simply plug it into any LAN port on your router. They do still claim that putting the Ooma first will give the best voice quality, but now it's listed as an "alternative setup option."

Gee, I wonder why? :)
 


If you are contemplating changing your phone service provider, it may be worthwhile to see if you can "port" your old phone number from your current phone service to the new service.

In many cases (but not all of them), you can bring your old phone number with you, even if you are moving from a land line to a wireless phone or to a VoIP line. This can save you the trouble of having to update your phone number with credit card companies, banks, and so on.

Also, sometimes a provider will offer a discount on your service or equipment if you port your number from a competitor, so be sure to ask about it if you speak with a service representative.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
If you are contemplating changing your phone service provider, it may be worthwhile to see if you can "port" your old phone number from your current phone service to the new service. In many cases (but not all of them), you can bring your old phone number with you, even if you are moving from a land line to a wireless phone or to a VoIP line....
In fact, I was able to port a Verizon landline phone number to a Verizon Wireless cellular number (with a bit of effort), but I don't believe it was possible to port the Verizon landline to other cellular carriers. (But, presumably, I could now port from Verizon Wireless to another celluar carrier.)

The problem for me is that our old landline number is subject to massive spam/scam/robocall abuse. Having it on an iPhone with Do Not Disturb helps greatly to manage this abuse, but it's still a big PITA, so switching to a new number and killing off the old one is a prime consideration. But, of course, notifying all the people and legitimate organizations about the change is a huge, problematic project of its own.
 


In fact, I was able to port a Verizon landline phone number to a Verizon Wireless cellular number (with a bit of effort), but I don't believe it was possible to port the Verizon landline to other cellular carriers. (But, presumably, I could now port from Verizon Wireless to another celluar carrier.)
Agreed. A lot depends on local circumstances. I just punched a New Jersey-based Verizon landline number I have access to into the AT&T wireless portal, and AT&T indicates that the number can be ported to their wireless services. Personally, I'm considering transferring my CT-based Frontier landline (originally a Bell System / SNET line) to something less expensive, and I've been pleased to see that it is transferrable to a wide range of wireless and VoIP systems.
The problem for me is that our old landline number is subject to massive spam/scam/robocall abuse. Having it on an iPhone with Do Not Disturb helps greatly to manage this abuse, but it's still a big PITA, so switching to a new number and killing off the old one is a prime consideration. But, of course, notifying all the people and legitimate organizations about the change is a huge, problematic project of its own.
Indeed. Unfortunately, it's been very disappointing to see how quickly the frequency of scam calls and robocalls sent to my personal cell phone number has been catching up to the frequency I get on my landline, despite never giving my personal cell phone number to anyone except family and friends. I stopped answering calls from unrecognized numbers on my landline years ago, and I recently started to do the same on my cell phone, too.
 


... The problem for me is that our old landline number is subject to massive spam/scam/robocall abuse. Having it on an iPhone with Do Not Disturb helps greatly to manage this abuse, but it's still a big PITA, so switching to a new number and killing off the old one is a prime consideration. But, of course, notifying all the people and legitimate organizations about the change is a huge, problematic project of its own.
I do not believe that killing off a telephone number clobbered with spam and getting another telephone number will necessarily have less spam. The number that you are transferring to could have had a deadbeat owner who signed up for all kinds of spam and is shared with other spammers. The fact that the number might have been dormant for some period of time, does not necessarily make the spammers go away. If you could make robo calls for nearly nothing, would you spend time cleaning up your call list that has millions of numbers in it?

There is an exception. ATT was late going to Montana to offer cell service and thus the cell numbers being doled out by ATT were new numbers, not reused numbers. We have a million people in Montana with a single 406 area code, so in theory, there are about 7 million spare numbers if each person only had one telephone device. This is only in theory.

Since ATT did not do business in Montana when I purchased an iPhone, I got an iPhone with a number outside of Montana. It turned out to be a reused number with the previous owner of the number having issues with debt collectors. I have on occasion received calls asking for the whereabouts of the previous owner of my cell number. My first iPhone was a 3GS so the callers have long memories and/or seriously out of date call numbers.
 


If you are contemplating changing your phone service provider, it may be worthwhile to see if you can "port" your old phone number from your current phone service to the new service.
In many cases (but not all of them), you can bring your old phone number with you, even if you are moving from a land line to a wireless phone or to a VoIP line. This can save you the trouble of having to update your phone number with credit card companies, banks, and so on.
Also, sometimes a provider will offer a discount on your service or equipment if you port your number from a competitor, so be sure to ask about it if you speak with a service representative.
Nearly 10 years ago my dad changed from AT&T to Vonage, and he had the phone number ported. Days after receiving the Vonage device, Vonage had our phone number ported. Can't believe how seamless it was. People we’d called in the past noticed no difference. Smooth as silk, as they say.
 


Which is a contributing reason why the POTS lines are dying off. The more folks who jump off of the classic POTS wires, the less viable the infrastructure becomes. If almost everyone has a POTS line, then the infrastructure costs are spread out over almost the maximum number of people. As there are fewer folks paying for the same infrastructure over a very large area, it trends toward the unviable point. Given that "local phone" companies own some of the 'exit' points (switching to cellphone or providing basic IP data connection), there is no perfect market dynamic that will get AT&T / Version / etc. to lower costs. If they can see that long term it will fail, they'll just leave the prices higher and ride for as long as they can.
In Seattle, we had an outage yesterday that shut down everything electrical in my condo. I was talking to a government office. They disappeared, because I was using a cordless phone. Then my landline rang. It was the same government official calling me back. This is why I have a land line. It is disappearing, because the phone company can make more money going completely digital. It does not need to be a disaster. I call this a shot across the digital bow. We, the customers, are allowing this to happen.

I must also mention that my cell was working, but charging it is limited to what you have on hand to keep it charged. Just a simple thought: in a real disaster, like an earthquake, all bets are off.
 


Regarding Tracfone, you may want to look at moving to T-Mobile. We have a spare Motorola flip-phone and they have a minimum $10/year, once you've spent $100 on the account. Generally, even when I used the phone regularly, that worked out to around $20-$50 per year, after that first year when we spent the aforementioned $100. The service is pretty good with the Motorola, which seems to have better reception than the iPhones.
I don't believe T-Mobile offers the "Gold Status" pay-go plan anymore (where, after spending $100 in a year ,you can pay $10/year). Their current pay-go plan is $3/month for 30 texts or calls, $0.10 per call or text after the initial 30 (and lets you purchase data at $5 for 500 MB for a day or $10 for 1 GB for a week).

For light usage, Red Pocket has some great plans ($60/year for 100 calls/100 texts; 500 MB per month is the cheapest) and can be used on any of the four major carriers.
 


That's good to hear. Do you have the Ooma placed behind your router, and if so, have you had to make any QoS adjustments? I haven't set mine up yet. They say putting the Ooma first will allow it to prioritize your phone calls and give the best quality, but I hesitate to do that; my router should handle network security.
I have Ooma inside the firewall. I originally gave it QoS adjustments, but that died when I got a Mikrotik router.... That said, the alarm company tested the line, and they say it works fine.
I don't believe T-Mobile offers the "Gold Status" pay-go plan anymore (where, after spending $100 in a year ,you can pay $10/year).
Sorry for my outdated info, I must be grandfathered.

Regarding power outages, I do have one of those long-life, low-wattage APC backup power supplies attached to the router and the Ooma box. My phones are old enough to work when you unplug them! (Only one is a real Western Electric phone.)

I gave up POTS but kept my phone number, because FIOS made me do it. I then moved from cable/FIOS phone services to Ooma and CallCentric because of the call spam. CallCentric is not as good as Ooma in sound quality, but they're a lot cheaper. (Maybe it's the adapter, I don't know.)
 


...The problem for me is that our old landline number is subject to massive spam/scam/robocall abuse....
For any number that is still configured as a land line, have you tried connecting it to a fax machine that picks up after five rings?

We did this, and the spam calls slowly went down. Coincidence, or do spammers update each other with the info that our land line is a fax line and so should be removed from calling?
 


Agreed. A lot depends on local circumstances. I just punched a New Jersey-based Verizon landline number I have access to into the AT&T wireless portal, and AT&T indicates that the number can be ported to their wireless services. Personally, I'm considering transferring my CT-based Frontier landline (originally a Bell System / SNET line) to something less expensive, and I've been pleased to see that it is transferrable to a wide range of wireless and VoIP systems.

Indeed. Unfortunately, it's been very disappointing to see how quickly the frequency of scam calls and robocalls sent to my personal cell phone number has been catching up to the frequency I get on my landline, despite never giving my personal cell phone number to anyone except family and friends. I stopped answering calls from unrecognized numbers on my landline years ago, and I recently started to do the same on my cell phone, too.
Many scammers just robocall through every possible number, so they eventually will get to your new number as well. You may lose the callers who are targeting specific people, groups or ages for their scams.
 


For any number that is still configured as a land line, have you tried connecting it to a fax machine that picks up after five rings? We did this, and the spam calls slowly went down. Coincidence, or do spammers update each other with the info that our land line is a fax line and so should be removed from calling?
We still get fax calls now and then on our landlines, and there seems no way to stop those until they give up. Not sure if they are scammers or just wrong numbers.
 


If you are contemplating changing your phone service provider, it may be worthwhile to see if you can "port" your old phone number from your current phone service to the new service. In many cases (but not all of them), you can bring your old phone number with you, even if you are moving from a land line to a wireless phone or to a VoIP line. This can save you the trouble of having to update your phone number with credit card companies, banks, and so on. Also, sometimes a provider will offer a discount on your service or equipment if you port your number from a competitor, so be sure to ask about it if you speak with a service representative.
I was able to port my local NYC Verizon landline number to a new cellular account from Credo with no hassles on either end. Of course, the important thing to remember is to port the number before you cancel the service...
 


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