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I'm an ex-Quicken user who switched to MoneyDance several years ago. MD works fine for most everything, but I'd like to start using a budget. Either I don't quite get MD's budget, or it doesn't work very well. And calling up the budget interface is really slow. So, I'm thinking of switching to another program to track my banking, finances, and start using a budget. I've heard that Banktivity (iBank) is good for this. I remember there were some reservations about iBank in the past - transactions that didn't link to other accounts and security issues. Are these still issues and are there others? Do you use and like the Banktivity budgets?
 


I'm still using Quicken 2007, but the small bank I deal with recently upgraded its web banking service and in the process broke the Web Connect downloads I have been using. Some extensive digging - by opening the .qfx files with TextEdit and Nisus - reveals a change in format of the Web Connect files. Those that work include invisible characters (apparently tabs) between entries in the format <XXXXXX>YYYYYYYY . The new Web Connect files have no tabs separating the entries; they all run together in the text file. Both versions of WebConnect files will open in identical-looking readable form in Numbers.

I'm trying to work with my bank on the issue, but I'm not optimistic it's going to work. So far the big bank where we have credit cards has not broken WebConnect, but I wouldn't be surprised if they do eventually. (The big bank does not support Firefox for the Mac, although so far they have not blocked me from using it.)
 


I'm still using Quicken 2007, but the small bank I deal with recently upgraded its web banking service and in the process broke the Web Connect downloads I have been using. Some extensive digging - by opening the .qfx files with TextEdit and Nisus - reveals a change in format of the Web Connect files. Those that work include invisible characters (apparently tabs) between entries in the format <XXXXXX>YYYYYYYY . The new Web Connect files have no tabs separating the entries; they all run together in the text file. Both versions of WebConnect files will open in identical-looking readable form in Numbers.
I'm trying to work with my bank on the issue, but I'm not optimistic it's going to work. So far the big bank where we have credit cards has not broken WebConnect, but I wouldn't be surprised if they do eventually. (The big bank does not support Firefox for the Mac, although so far they have not blocked me from using it.)
We who rely on Quicken 2007 are living on borrowed time.

[See Quicken & alternatives in the older MacInTouch forum] for the many previous conversations we've had about alternative ways to import data into and out of Quicken.

At work we download all bank and broker data as .CSV and store in spreadsheets. In some accounts, we summarize the data by category in the spreadsheet and enter just the summary. Keeps the Quicken file from ballooning.

Data that works best in Quicken can be converted from .CSV to .QIF manually, but we find ProperSoft's CSV2QIF worth the $40 price. It's even "Mojave" compatible. A restricted free trial is available. ProperSoft offers a wide variety of conversion products.

The MoneyDance "Quicken alternative" may provide an alternate way to download your bank data, and will export .QIF files Quicken 2007 can import. I've used it that way, and keep it around, but much prefer Quicken 2007. The current 2017.10 version of the $49.99 MoneyDance is Mojave compatible. There's a free trial, at the link below:
 


I know Quicken 2018 won’t work for everybody who depends on 2007 features. For me, however, I finally made the change this past summer - found the data migration to be troublesome enough to take a number of trial runs before I felt I had cleaned up the data sufficiently. All in all, though, I have to say that the data conversion was quite remarkable given the complexity.

In addition, the current version of Quicken 2018 is fast, friendly and quite usable. A few things I can’t find, like an individual stock’s performance over time, and getting account balances, portfolio balances, and YTD investment transactions into Excel, are awkward. For the most part, though, it’s a quite significant improvement over Q2007.
 


I know Quicken 2018 won’t work for everybody who depends on 2007 features. For me, however, I finally made the change this past summer - found the data migration to be troublesome enough to take a number of trial runs before I felt I had cleaned up the data sufficiently. All in all, though, I have to say that the data conversion was quite remarkable given the complexity.

In addition, the current version of Quicken 2018 is fast, friendly and quite usable. A few things I can’t find, like an individual stock’s performance over time, and getting account balances, portfolio balances, and YTD investment transactions into Excel, are awkward. For the most part, though, it’s a quite significant improvement over Q2007.
I'm still using Quicken 2007, so my day of reckoning is coming. Can you buy Quicken 2018 or do you have to rent it on a year-by-year basis?
 


I'm still using Quicken 2007, so my day of reckoning is coming. Can you buy Quicken 2018 or do you have to rent it on a year-by-year basis?
It’s year by year. I gave a lot of thought to that. I came to the conclusion that in this world where everybody wants to give you a website to do your finances, it’s worth an ongoing investment to make sure we have a product that works on the Macs.
 


I'm still using Quicken 2007, so my day of reckoning is coming. Can you buy Quicken 2018 or do you have to rent it on a year-by-year basis?
It is subscription; however, it is in my view subscription done right. Most subscriptions either totally disable the software or change it to read-only if you don't renew. Quicken is still mostly functional as local software on your computer if you don't renew. You can view and edit your data, run reports, etc. What is disabled is the online features: downloading transactions, updating stock quotes, cloud sync to your mobile devices, etc.

See the Quicken Data Access Guarantee.

In other words, it's really not all that different than what it's always been, except that with Quicken 2007 we've had an abnormally long grace period where online functions still worked. When the day comes that online features of 2007 no longer work, you'll be in the same boat as if you subscribed to the current version and then cancelled your subscription. The only difference would be that, for how old the 2007 code base it, it seems more likely that a future macOS update will break 2007 than it would a more recent version.

Yes, it will cost a little more, because you'll have to renew the subscription every year instead choosing to only purchase upgrades every 3-4 years. But, the subscription price is lower than the upgrade price used to be, and you also have access to the Windows version in the event you want to try that out.

Note: I still use 2007 as my primary financial software, but I did purchase a Quicken 2018 subscription last year when they had a sale. I did that for two reasons, to test it out and because for the relatively low cost I felt it was worth rewarding Quicken for what I viewed as a solid, good-faith effort to improve the Mac version of the software.

I still prefer the utilitarian, multi-window UI of 2007 over the "slick" unified UI of the newer versions. But from a functionality standpoint, 2018 will meet my needs. I had to change how I had entered some of my investment transactions which didn't play well with the conversion process. Those are all fixed, and the rest of my data all converted cleanly into 2018. All that remains is to catch up on some old transactions I never entered related to a real estate transaction. I'm more comfortable entering those details in the familiar 2007 UI, but once that's done I'll be moving permanently to the new Quicken and renewing my subscription when the time comes.
 


It’s year by year. I gave a lot of thought to that. I came to the conclusion that in this world where everybody wants to give you a website to do your finances, it’s worth an ongoing investment to make sure we have a product that works on the Macs.
I purchased both Mac and Windows versions of Quicken 2017 in order to effect my conversion from Quicken 2007. My experience and recommendations are on the old forum. I continue to use Quicken 2017 without upgrading to 2018, and Q17 has received a few updates.

After a year, I can say that I am quite happy with the Windows version, which works very well. The only problem is that my muscle memory continues to follow the order entry of Quicken Mac, but the register entries are somewhat different on Windows Q17.

I run Q17 in a Windows 7 virtual machine. The only internet service I use is for my portfolio transactions. I still prefer manual entry and reconciliation of purchase transactions, and I don't want to rely on third-party services and interfaces that will be arbitrarily changed in order to get me to accept a wallet-ectomy.

I think you could safely run the Windows version for a decade in a VM, if you don't mind manual entry.

I wouldn't use a Mac for any vital personal data, as they have proven to be unreliable suppliers, with security flaws, data loss, API changes that keep legacy software from operating, poor and changing UI (Windows is now closer to Mac UI guidelines), higher cost, small installed base, etc.
 



It is subscription; however, it is in my view subscription done right. Most subscriptions either totally disable the software or change it to read-only if you don't renew. Quicken is still mostly functional as local software on your computer if you don't renew. You can view and edit your data, run reports, etc. What is disabled is the online features: downloading transactions, updating stock quotes, cloud sync to your mobile devices, etc. ...
Joe F - this is extremely promising news. I use Quicken 2007 as purely local software, and I intend to continue using it in that way. So it sounds like I could buy Quicken 2018 and just keep using it (in local mode) after the subscription runs out. I.e. I'd be able to keep entering transactions even with no active subscription. Assuming this is indeed the case, it looks like I'll be happy buying Quicken 2018. Thanks for the careful explanation of how this works.

Indeed Quicken 2007 is going to stop working soon. It's a 32-bit app, and very likely the next OS after Mojave will no longer permit 32-bit apps to work. So the clock is ticking on that front. I'm a bit (a lot) unhappy to hear that I can't have separate windows for my separate accounts, but I guess I'll just have to learn to live with that.
 


Joe F - this is extremely promising news. I use Quicken 2007 as purely local software, and I intend to continue using it in that way. So it sounds like I could buy Quicken 2018 and just keep using it (in local mode) after the subscription runs out. I.e. I'd be able to keep entering transactions even with no active subscription. Assuming this is indeed the case, it looks like I'll be happy buying Quicken 2018. Thanks for the careful explanation of how this works. Indeed Quicken 2007 is going to stop working soon. It's a 32-bit app, and very likely the next OS after Mojave will no longer permit 32-bit apps to work. So the clock is ticking on that front. I'm a bit (a lot) unhappy to hear that I can't have separate windows for my separate accounts, but I guess I'll just have to learn to live with that.
As JSchaffe correctly points out above, you can open accounts in separate windows, which makes it tolerable. But you still have the main unified window that tries to cram a lot of info into it and that takes up a lot of screen space. The old UI definitely looked cluttered, but I could make much better use of the limited space on my laptop screen than I can with the new UI. And I'm not sure what other data sets, other than individual accounts, you can "pop out" from that main window (not at my Mac right night to check). Can you open just the accounts list in a separate window? Your total investment portfolio? Your loan amortization schedule? I have a base set of windows I always have open in Quicken 2007. When I need to see other stuff, I can open the relevant window (ie, Portfolio) and when done, close it, and all my normal windows are right where I left them. I don't have to navigate back to them. Not a deal breaker, but as a Quicken user since 1994, that's a lot of muscle memory and inertia to overcome!

As for Quicken's subscription policy... who wants to be the first to not renew their subscription and verify what happens? LOL But seriously, the new owners seem to be trying really hard to make up for Intuit's past sins and do right by their customers. So it's very promising.
 


As a decades-long Quicken Mac (Q-Mac) user, and a subscriber to Q-Mac 2018, I offer the following thoughts:
  • If you're in love with opening lots of separate windows to manage your Quicken accounts ("the utilitarian, multi-window UI of 2007"), you can still do this in Q-Mac 2018. Double-click on each account name (in the sidebar list) you want to open separately; their windows will open. Then (if you don't like the "the main unified window that tries to cram a lot of info into it and that takes up a lot of screen space"), simply close the "main" window. Your individual account windows will remain open, you can arrange them as you prefer, and simply ignore the "main" window altogether... or bring it back on screen again at a moment's notice with the CMD-1 shortcut or the aptly named command under the "Windows" menu.
  • Can you open other things from your sidebar, such as your entire portfolio, in separate windows? Yes. Double-click on "Investments" in your sidebar, and your entire portfolio opens in a separate window. I do not think it's possible merely to open the sidebar list of accounts, without showing anything else in the "main" window.
  • To find "a few things I can’t find, like an individual stock’s performance over time," click on the individual security's name in the Portfolio view, then choose "Security Overview." You'll arrive at a website run by Quicken containing security overviews. It's limited, and might not fulfill your desires, but Quicken sells its "Premier" version which includes deeper/longer overview results for individual investments.
  • Re: Subscription - I, too, concluded that for software on which I depend consistently, year after year, decade after decade, I'd be silly to expect up-to-date performance without buying upgrades. I used to buy upgrades every 2-3 years anyway. Now I buy them annually, at a lower price. And, as others have said above, I sincerely want to reward the new owners of Quicken for very significantly improving Q-Mac, and for keeping it up to date. To me, that's worth the price.
 


I'm still pretty angry about the huge changes that have been made to the Quicken UI. This is a horrible case of putting a square peg into a round hole. I had purchased Q2016 for two purposes: 1) To obtain access to an updated version of Q2007 which would survive an Apple update and continue full functionality, and 2) To see if Q2016 was as bad as people were saying. It was bad. Very bad. And I am not seeing anyone here say anything that encourages me to think that they have improved any whatsoever.

The 2016 fiasco showed that they could 'patch' the 2007 version at some level to maintain OS compatibility (for example, they still have not 'lost' the source code!). The clear 'checkbook/accounts book' interface is fundamental to how finances are managed (having all entries shown as a database layout is simply not sensible; does anyone at Quicken know how to balance a checkbook or manage investments?). They clearly have a huge share of the marketplace, even more so now that Apple is the largest company in the world; why wouldn't a company maintain (properly) a viable product for the Mac community? Why can't they update Q2007 and start a subscription model for keeping it up to date?

OK. Enough sour grapes. I guess it makes sense to update to Q2018 to support this achy-breaky company as they 'fiddle' with their product line. But I don't like it!
 


As a decades-long Quicken Mac (Q-Mac) user, and a subscriber to Q-Mac 2018, I offer the following thoughts...
Helpful comments, Ralph. Thanks

Given the positive comments here regarding Quicken's latest Mac incarnation I decided to give it a try. The very reasonable price was encouraging - I elected for the middle price, "DeLuxe" . I've been using SEE Finance for the last several years and find it to be invaluable for getting quick reports, as well as producing summaries of business expenses for schedule C tax return data.

The import went well up to a point, although including investments accounts caused a stall within a "prices" field somewhere towards the end. So I tried importing just non-investment accounts from SEE Finance. This did the trick. On another account, there was no problem with importing everything, but the account balances were all over the place.

The user interface is quite nice. I particularly like the quick look at investment data (that is lacking in SEE Finance ) via Quicken's web link. I cannot go back and import new QIF files (those pesky investment accounts) whether by a direct import of a QIF file or trying to merge a Quicken file (new) generated from an investment account. It is possible to import QFX files

Reports (by payee or category) are quite attractive, although printing them to a PDF is ugly (>100 pages of a PDF file).There does not seem to be a way to print just the summary data, even if that is what you are looking at.

Reconciling is dire - SEE Finance allows a download of of a QIF file that is then used to compare bank data with your data. There are some slight clumsinesses here, but if you find a bank transaction that you don't have, you just click the "reconciled" box and add it to your transactions. There doesn't seem to be anything like this in Quicken (see above regarding importing QIF files).

The investments view is quite helpful, but the way it calculates returns within a partfolio is a bit dubious - if you have bought or sold something, it will cause the longer-term internal rate of returns (IRR) to be ridiculous. There is no accurate internal rate of return that I can find (SEE Finance doesn't have this either).

I was going to run Quicken and SEE Finance in parallel, but given the shortcomings in Quicken, I think I will just mothball it and go back to SEE Finance. I haven't quite got used to SEE Finance 2 (it is challenging to teach an old dog new tricks), although its iOS integration is very useful if I'm not in front of a computer.
 


I was going to run Quicken and SEE Finance in parallel, but given the shortcomings in Quicken, I think I will just mothball it and go back to SEE Finance. I haven't quite got used to SEE Finance 2 (it is challenging to teach an old dog new tricks), although its iOS integration is very useful if I'm not in front of a computer.
It looks like SEE Finance 2 has finally fixed the transfer problem, where it treated transfers as two separate transactions and didn't automatically keep them in sync.

I wonder what else SEE Finance 2 has improved.
 


I'm using Quicken 2007 on Mojave and ran into a problem with the "Save a Copy" feature. I'm getting the error "Unable to erase partly-copied files." I assume this is an incompatibility with APFS. Any comments would be appreciated.
 


I'm using Quicken 2007 on Mojave and ran into a problem with the "Save a Copy" feature. I'm getting the error "Unable to erase partly-copied files." I assume this is an incompatibility with APFS. Any comments would be appreciated.
Qucken 2007 will not back up or save a copy in Mojave. It will backup via Time Machine....
 


Qucken 2007 will not back up or save a copy in Mojave. It will backup via Time Machine....
For whatever reason, the "package" that is a Quicken 2007 .QDFM file will not rsync. Dragging and dropping the .QDFM package in Finder, as I recall from long ago because I don't do it anymore, was at best unreliable. The same rsync fail afflicts sparsebundles. This was an issue trying when trying to back up or attempting to exchange QDFM files with another user over the internet.

Two workarounds:

1. Create a standard DMG, not a Sparsebundle, and use it to store the QDFM file. Using a filename convention, such as 2019-01-31v1, for the DMG makes it easy to back up after Quicken is closed and the DMG unmounted. Simply duplicate the DMG and update its file name. For transferring between users over the Internet, encrypt the DMG at creation. An 11MB DMG will hold a "large" QDFM, and until Google started bouncing encrypted DMGs, was easy to email. Currently, we're using Google Drive to exchange encrypted DMGs and 7- Zip (the other encrypted format Google isn't accepting as a Gmail attachment).​
2. Compress the QDFM with Zip, if security isn't important, or encrypted 7-Zip if the file might be transferred over the Internet. Again, it is possible to rename either the original QDFM and/or the compressed copy for archival backups. This protects the QDFM, but the unzipping is actually an extra step compared to opening a DMG, and requires the QDFM be given an incremental name change before zipping, or on unzipping it might overwrite the original.​
Would these techniques work in Mojave?

If, for example, the standard DMG holding a Quicken QDFM is larger, say 200 MB, would Quicken 2007 File > Save a Copy work if the save-to target is the mounted DMG, not a "Mojave disk?"

(It should be obvious: I don't have Mojave installed to test.)
 


... would Quicken 2007 File > Save a Copy work if the save-to target is the mounted DMG, not a "Mojave disk?"
FWIW, I tried the "Save a Copy" command using a DMG and external disk, both formatted as HFS+, with the same results. Therefore, Mojave itself is the culprit.

I've used this command over the years since it seems that it also checks the database for problems when it does the backup. (Not an issue for now, since this is my company machine that I only use on occasion for Quicken.)
 


My bank where I use Quicken 2007 with Direct Connect has been acquired by a larger one that supports only Web Connect. I have found that Quicken 2007 is unable to properly read a QFX file from the bank. I tested a new account that just had a cash balance and no transactions but it did not see the balance. I've seen a post that says QFX format changed to remove tabs that used to be in there. Has anyone got a solution or seen a Perl script that might fix this?
 


My bank where I use Quicken 2007 with Direct Connect has been acquired by a larger one that supports only Web Connect. I have found that Quicken 2007 is unable to properly read a QFX file from the bank. I tested a new account that just had a cash balance and no transactions but it did not see the balance. I've seen a post that says QFX format changed to remove tabs that used to be in there. Has anyone got a solution or seen a Perl script that might fix this?
The financial institutions we use at work provide .CSV downloads. We bought and use CSV2QIFCSV2QIF to Convert CSV to QIF for $39.99 Works well.

It is also possible, once you've examined the format by exporting a QIF from an account, to do it yourself using spreadsheets and mail merge.
ProperSoft said:
Import into Quicken (Windows and Mac)
CSV2QFXCSV2QFX
Convert CSV to QFX (Web Connect)
$39.99
CSV2QIFCSV2QIF
Convert CSV to QIF
$39.99
PDF2QFXPDF2QFX
Convert PDF to QFX (Web Connect)
$49.99
PDF2QIFPDF2QIF
Convert PDF to QIF
$49.99
Bank2QIFBank2QIF
Convert PDF/QFX/OFX/QBO/QIF to QIF
$69.99
Bank2QFXBank2QFX
Convert PDF/QFX/OFX/QBO/QIF to QFX
$69.99
CSV2CSVCSV2CSV
Convert CSV to Mint/QB Online/Xero
$19.99
QFX2QIFQFX2QIF
Convert QFX to QIF
$39.99
QIF2QFXQIF2QFX
Convert QIF to QFX (Web Connect)
$39.99
Quicken 2007 is being extinguished as rapidly as possible by its new owner....
 


It's not all QFX files that no longer work with Quicken 2007. Bank of America's have been working for me, but those from my small local bank stopped working when they upgraded their web site. I imagine BoA's will stop working sooner or later. You can read QFX on some versions of Numbers.
 


So, what is the final summary on the Mojave upgrade and Q2007?

I am running macOS Sierra (10.12.6) and Q2007 runs fine for me right now (download stock prices, import transactions from a Fidelity account, budget and easy reports). I understand that there is a problem with the automatic Q2007 backup feature, but I thought that someone said if the backups were on a HFS volume (other than the boot drive), the backups would work still.

I got a nasty-gram from Intuit saying that the version of Q2016 that I bought (solely to get them to give me the working Q2007 fix) will stop downloading stock prices and (maybe) bank/investment transactions. I understand that that is true for Q2016, but is it true for Q2007?
 


So, what is the final summary on the Mojave upgrade and Q2007?
I am running macOS Sierra (10.12.6) and Q2007 runs fine for me right now (download stock prices, import transactions from a Fidelity account, budget and easy reports). I understand that there is a problem with the automatic Q2007 backup feature, but I thought that someone said if the backups were on a HFS volume (other than the boot drive), the backups would work still.
I got a nasty-gram from Intuit saying that the version of Q2016 that I bought (solely to get them to give me the working Q2007 fix) will stop downloading stock prices and (maybe) bank/investment transactions. I understand that that is true for Q2016, but is it true for Q2007?
I'm running Q2007 fine on High Sierra and Mojave. Yes, for these O/S versions, for the automatic backups to work (not that I've ever needed to use them) your Quicken data needs to reside on a HFS+ formatted volume. I used Disk Doctor to create a small HFS+ volume for my Quicken data and everything works fine.

I've had a few problems with financial institutions, like my local S&L, giving up using the format of QFX files that Q2007 can handle. AMEX, Chase, CitiBank, TD Ameritrade, and Vanguard still work for me.
 


I'm running Q2007 fine on High Sierra and Mojave. Yes, for these O/S versions, for the automatic backups to work (not that I've ever needed to use them) your Quicken data needs to reside on a HFS+ formatted volume. I used Disk Doctor to create a small HFS+ volume for my Quicken data and everything works fine.
I've had a few problems with financial institutions, like my local S&L, giving up using the format of QFX files that Q2007 can handle. AMEX, Chase, CitiBank, TD Ameritrade, and Vanguard still work for me.
I can confirm Q2007 runs well and automatically backs up on High Sierra running on an HFS+ formatted volume (an external spinning FireWire startup drive on a 2010 Mac Mini).

The QFX formatting issue seems to be buried somewhere inside the software used by banks. I ran into two problems when my small local bank upgraded their web operations. The first problem came a while back when the software started naming the QFX files in a format that Q2007 could not understand. I was able to overcome that by renaming the files after downloading them. The second one several months ago apparently changed the internal format of the files so Q2007 could not read them at all. Someone upstream suggested the change was dropping embedded tabs, and when I investigated, that seemed to be the case, but I could not see an easy way to change that formatting so I went back to entering data manually, which I normally do to keep the bank balance up to date.

The 2010 Mac Mini won't run Mojave, so I am tempted to just keep it to run Q2007, but I may give the new version a test run to see if it meets my report needs.
 


The QFX formatting issue seems to be buried somewhere inside the software used by banks. I ran into two problems when my small local bank upgraded their web operations. The first problem came a while back when the software started naming the QFX files in a format that Q2007 could not understand. I was able to overcome that by renaming the files after downloading them. The second one several months ago apparently changed the internal format of the files so Q2007 could not read them at all. Someone upstream suggested the change was dropping embedded tabs, and when I investigated, that seemed to be the case, but I could not see an easy way to change that formatting so I went back to entering data manually, which I normally do to keep the bank balance up to date.
I noticed the same issues, Jeff. If your bank makes a change where the download name of a QFX file becomes something really long, it's worth trying shortening the name before trying to import the file into Quicken. I had at least one bank where that worked.

Although I can't be bothered to do this any more, I came up with a way to modify new format .qif files so they could be read by Q2007. Here it is, for anyone interested:
  1. Open the .qif in TextWrangler
  2. Remove blank line at start
  3. replace all other blank lines with ^
  4. end with two lines of ^
 


... The 2010 Mac Mini won't run Mojave, so I am tempted to just keep it to run Q2007, but I may give the new version a test run to see if it meets my report needs.
macOS Mojave Patcher will allow Mojave to run on the 2010 Mac Mini. Works best in dark mode!
 


Can Quicken 2007 Mac support Quicken Express Web Connect, or is it restricted to only Direct Connect and Web Connect? If so it might get around the issue of certain QFX files not being readable due to missing tabs or long file names (which is easy to fix).
 



My 2010 Mac Mini is running on a spinning external FireWire drive, and speed is becoming an issue on High Sierra, so I'm planning to replace it with a new Mini by 2020. It doesn't seem worth running a hack to run Mojave when I would have to worry about the hacked Mojave eventually having problems with Quicken 2007. I [don't] expect imports to Quicken 2007 to keep on working forever, but I could keep the old machine to access my old business and personal finance records, if need be.
 


How does it perform? A 2010 Mac Mini is probably slower than the minimum supported hardware configuration.
The Mini performs OK with the patch/hack. The old Core 2 Duo is no speedster compared to new chips but adequate, in my opinion. Quicken 2007 should work to EOL in Mojave. I plan to run Quicken 2007 in a VM (Parallels) with the next edition of macOS.
 



Has anyone had experience subscribing to Quicken 2018 or 2019 and continuing to use Quicken after the subscription expires? I know that online transactions and downloading aren't supported after it expires, but I hope that editing, viewing, and creating new files is still possible with full functionality.

I'm considering subscribing to the latest version to import many years of Quicken 2007 data then quitting after a year. I know that importing 2007 data improved in the 2018 version, and maybe it's better in 2019? I have 2017. Their Quicken Data Access Guarantee sounds promising but a little unclear.

I also wonder if they've added the ability to start a new year by bringing investements forward but clearing out other transactions? Using that feature in 2007, I have many separate years of data to import and keep as separate 2019 files.

I noticed in Quicken 2017 that you can turn off data syncing, but it shows that it syncs when a file is first created, even though the preference to sync is disabled. So my plan with 2019 would be to create a file then try blocking all outgoing connnections and hope that none of my data is uploaded. Any feedback is appreciated.
 


Has anyone had experience subscribing to Quicken 2018 or 2019 and continuing to use Quicken after the subscription expires? I know that online transactions and downloading aren't supported after it expires, but I hope that editing, viewing, and creating new files is still possible with full functionality. I'm considering subscribing to the latest version to import many years of Quicken 2007 data then quitting after a year. I know that importing 2007 data improved in the 2018 version, and maybe it's better in 2019? I have 2017. Their Quicken Data Access Guarantee sounds promising but a little unclear. I also wonder if they've added the ability to start a new year, by bringing investments forward but clearing out other transactions? Using that feature in 2007, I have many separate years of data to import and keep as separate 2019 files. I noticed in Quicken 2017 that you can turn off data syncing, but it shows that it syncs when a file is first created, even though the preference to sync is disabled. So my plan with 2019 would be to create a file then try blocking all outgoing connnections and hope that none of my data is uploaded. Any feedback is appreciated.
I plan to run a dual operation for a while after Catalina is issued in the fall. Quicken 2007 will be run in Parallels on El Capitan and Quicken 2017 on Catalina. As I refer to Quicken several times/day I plan to use the Parallels Picture in Picture feature. My only concern at this point is RAM usage and how that may affect the performance of certain applications.
 


As a long-time Quicken 2007 user, I, too, have been seeking a suitable replacement before it finally becomes obsolete. Until now, nothing seemed adequate for my needs.

Thanks to Ric's recent mention of a SEE Finance 2 update, I downloaded the trial version and gave it a spin. It looks like I've finally found something that checks all of my boxes:

- Imports Quicken QIF export file flawlessly​
- Imports transactions from my banks and credit card companies via Web Connect (QXF)​
- One-button security price updates​
- Easy manual update of prices for non-listed securities​
- Adequate reporting of transactions and holdings that I can import into a spreadsheet for further analysis​

I use Quicken to track investments, cash flow and expenses. I don't use bill pay or check writing, neither of which SEE offers. SEE does have a budgeting feature, but I haven't tried it.

I do like Quicken's loan amortization feature, which allows me to easily split payments into their proper expense categories. SEE Finance 2 has a number of loan account types, but I haven't seen any way to automatically account for interest and principal payments. I can easily split those transactions manually.

Nothing I've looked at can match Quicken 2007's robust reporting capabilities, but this version of SEE has enough for my purposes.

I need to spend some time checking and cleaning up expense categories and the like, but so far, I think SEE Finance 2 will meet my needs. I took the current $10 discount offer and plan to run Quicken and SEE side by side for a while.

Hope that helps some of you Quicken 2007 users looking for a non-subscription replacement option....
 


As a long-time Quicken 2007 user, I, too, have been seeking a suitable replacement before it finally becomes obsolete. Until now, nothing seemed adequate for my needs. Thanks to Ric's recent mention of a SEE Finance 2 update, I downloaded the trial version and gave it a spin. It looks like I've finally found something that checks all of my boxes:
I've been using SEE Finance for years now - I somewhat prefer Version 1—mostly, I think, because my brain won't change its workflows. It is very robust, very easy to use and produces wonderful on-the-fly reports The iOS connection for Version 2 is also very good—every so often, I do an export from Version 1 to Version 2 and update the files, so that I can look things up when I'm not connected to an actual computer.

I tried almost all the iterations of new Quicken and other programs—hated them all for one reason or another. SEE Finance was by far the closest in functionality to Quicken 2007, with the exception of investment stuff.

One of these days, I'm sure I'll switch to Version 2, which is certainly more attractive. But looks ain't everything, as they say.
 


I'm using See Finance as a replacement for Quicken 2007. My one objection to its interface is that it has a quirky way of distributing single transactions into multiple categories. In Quicken, for example, I could allocate a portion of a credit card expense to "furniture," another to "housewares" or a payroll check into various categories such as gross income and various deductions.

See Finance will do it, but it's a clumsy implementation. Whenever I set up a "split" transaction, it creates two categories by default. If I don't set up a "split" transaction, I'm unable to allocate the entire amount of the transaction to a distribution account. The program will make the allocation, but lists 100% as going to a distribution category or account; e.g., for credit card bills or rent payments, etc., but must contain a second distribution line to the same category to which 0% of the transaction is allocated.
 


Has anyone had experience subscribing to Quicken 2018 or 2019 and continuing to use Quicken after the subscription expires? I know that online transactions and downloading aren't supported after it expires, but I hope that editing, viewing, and creating new files is still possible with full functionality.
Sort of... Last year I signed up for the free year of Quicken Starter that came with my TurboTax. I did some testing with a couple of small-scale files that I imported from Quicken 2007. After the year expired last month, I tried a number of typical operations, concentrating on adding new transactions and editing existing ones. All seemed to work OK. The purpose of the latter test was to see if Quicken's claim was true about not losing the ability to continue using your data if you let the product expire. As far as I could tell, it was, though you lose the capability to download transactions (which I don't use anyway).
So my plan with 2019 would be to create a file then try blocking all outgoing connnections and hope that none of my data is uploaded. Any feedback is appreciated.
I routinely run Quicken Deluxe with connections blocked by Little Snitch, except when I want to check for software updates.
 


I use YNAB 4 for budgeting. The developers (for whom I had great respect) did something far worse than merely going subscription. It's now a subscription cloud-hosted service. Keeping my data 100% local is a non-negotiable requirement. And YNAB 4 is a 32-bit app, so we all know what's going to happen to it. But I'm having a very difficult time finding a budgeting workflow that works as well for me as YNAB (and I have tried!). I can only surmise that a big part of this is because it's a dedicated budgeting app, rather than a financial program that just happens to have a "budgeting" feature.

That being the case, I can think of no other solution than to run it in a VM, such as Snow Leopard Server. Since my workflow is 100% manual, lack of internet access won't be a problem.

I wish I could wrap my head around MoneyWell 3, which definitely checks the dedicated and local boxes, but the workflow is so vastly different.

It'd be nice to find a modern app that works as well for me as YNAB 4, but until that happens...
 


People looking to replace Quicken 2007 should also investigate Moneydance. The last time I did serious testing, Moneydance was the closest to Quicken in capabilities. However, one problem is that the Moneydance trial has a transaction limit that is too small to correct the import errors.
 


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