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I'll cast a vote for Moneydance. I had tried the new Quicken, I think starting with 2014 or 2015, but preferred to stay with Quicken 2007. I started keeping a separate set of books in Moneydance and a couple of years ago decided to switch over permanently instead of opting for the newer versions of Quicken. I'm not really fond of the interface but I can work with it, and if I move to another OS (Windows or Linux), it can move with me. I keep a copy of Moneydance on my backup Windows laptop and synch it with my Mac regularly.
I, too, will cast a vote for MoneyDance. I moved to it around 2010, when Intuit was in a bit of turmoil and kept delaying updates to Quicken 2007 on the Mac. When it came out, Quicken 2010 didn't even have features that existed in Quicken 2007, never mind parity with Quicken on Windows.

Yeah, it's Java based (so not very fast), and it's not as slick looking as other Mac apps. But MoneyDance does everything I need it to, including downloading from all my financial institutions and keeping track of investments. It has a Dropbox-based sync system, which allows me to sync across Mac/PC/Linux but also to iOS (though the iOS version is limited to showing bank accounts, credit cards, assets and liabilities, with no reporting functions, so it's basically a data entry front-end more than anything). This allows both my wife and I to input transactions on the iPhone as they happen, which keeps our records reasonably up-to-date. I also like that the file format is cross platform. Given the debacle around Quicken 2010, I would be concerned about migrating data to other platforms should Intuit - or whoever owns Quicken now - ever decide to drop the Mac (again).
 


I hope the following helps folks who are reluctantly looking for a replacement for the venerable Quicken 2007.

Now that I've been reluctantly forced to abandon Quicken 2007 (no more downloading transactions soon!), I spent a few days reviewing the alternatives and am happy to report that SEE Finance 2 is working really well for me. SEE Finance imported ~50,000 transactions flawlessly (even highlighting a few discrepancies I'd overlooked over the years). The OFX-based (think Microsoft Money) one-step update of prices and account transactions works better for me, and for more accounts, than Quicken 2007 ever did.

I have bank accounts, investment accounts, mutual funds, individual investments and some assets — all handled without problems. The program is very fast and seems to be rock solid. And I am rapidly adjusting to the new interface after all these years of muscle memory Quicken data entry.

The program handles multiple currencies, which might be a great feature for some, but I don’t need it.

I think the only thing I will probably miss is Quicken 2007’s extensive reporting capabilities. I haven’t fully explored the reporting in SEE Finance yet, but it looks adequate for my needs, though there may be some minor gaps.

Currently, you can buy the program for $39.99 “for a limited time”. Unlike current Quicken, no subscriptions are needed!

I have no connection with the developer, Scimonoce Software; I’m just, so far, a happy customer.
 


I actually did call AmEx yesterday (July 22). While they didn't say why the change was made, they were aware of the problem and were planning on fixing it within 4-6 weeks, but apparently due to the outcry from other Quicken/AmEx customers, there should be a fix in place by the end of this week (July 26). We'll see what happens.
Your skepticism was justified. As of 10pm EDT on Tuesday, 30 July 2019, AmEx still has no .qbo or .qfx available for download.
 


I hope the following helps folks who are reluctantly looking for a replacement for the venerable Quicken 2007. Now that I've been reluctantly forced to abandon Quicken 2007 (no more downloading transactions soon!), I spent a few days reviewing the alternatives and am happy to report that SEE Finance 2 is working really well for me. ... I have no connection with the developer, Scimonoce Software; I’m just, so far, a happy customer.
Ditto. Their email help has been very helpful. I've sent them wonky QFX files, for example, and they've been able to show me how 1) it was the bank's fault and 2) how to get them imported.

The program still doesn't have Quicken's smoothness in certain functions; getting a loan properly set up to amortize is a pill, for example. But for basic home bookkeeping, I've been very happy. And I'm happy not to be shelling out for another subscription.

I also have no connection with the developer.
 


Your skepticism was justified. As of 10pm EDT on Tuesday, 30 July 2019, AmEx still has no .qbo or .qfx available for download.
I actually use Moneydance and download .qfx files via the American Express website. In order to download .qfx or .qfo files, you need to select 'Preview New Version' from the 'Statements and Activity' tab and select the appropriate statement to view. You can then select 'Quicken' or 'Quickbooks' after clicking the download icon at the upper left corner of the transaction list.
 


I, too, am affected, except on Windows Quickbooks. I called Amex to ask where are the files? The tech said to call Intuit for workaround and that they are implementing direct download in four to eight weeks.

No notice. Thanks Amex. This merits saying Adam Sandler’s line from the movie Wedding Singer... "Information that would have been helpful yesterday."
 


Your skepticism was justified. As of 10pm EDT on Tuesday, 30 July 2019, AmEx still has no .qbo or .qfx available for download.
As a follow up... transaction downloads now work, but as 'Web Connect' rather than 'Quicken Connect'. You can right-click on the account, select Edit... Settings, and then Change Connection Type. I haven't checked out AForkosh's 'preview new version' trick yet... but I will.
 


As a follow up... transaction downloads now work, but as 'Web Connect' rather than 'Quicken Connect'. You can right-click on the account, select Edit... Settings, and then Change Connection Type. I haven't checked out AForkosh's 'preview new version' trick yet... but I will.
Bank of America has been calling its downloads "Web Connect for Quicken 2017" for a while, and they still worked on Quicken 2007 the last time I tried, a few weeks ago.
 


I actually use Moneydance and download .qfx files via the American Express website. In order to download .qfx or .qfo files, you need to select 'Preview New Version' from the 'Statements and Activity' tab and select the appropriate statement to view. You can then select 'Quicken' or 'Quickbooks' after clicking the download icon at the upper left corner of the transaction list.
I believe that the various direct connections from Quicken and other financial programs essentially work by scripting and screen-scraping the web-based interaction. So, when the website changes, a new interface must be supplied. I'm assuming that the financial institution, not the financial program writers are responsible for providing that. In American Express's case, they dropped the Quicken and Quickbook options from the current web interface when they made them available in the new version. On the website, they provided a patch to allow a user to manually go from one version to the next. However, when the new version becomes the current version, that patch will disappear. They probably thought that it was not worthwhile to provide a similar temporary patch for the financial program scripts. I predict that all will be well shortly after the version replacement occurs.

(I think that the sane thing to do with financial reporting is to not rely on independent financial programs directly importing data from a financial institution. You are relying on two companies with no direct dependence on one another to coordinate a change. Instead, one should export the data manually in the format most compatible with the program and then manually import the data into the program.)
 


I also believe that Quicken fetches information by scripting web-based user interaction. They seem to use a farm of Windows NT machines (quite probably virtualized on some hosting provider).

When you create a new account in Quicken, it asks for your login credentials and password. Quicken sends these to its cloud servers so they can screen-scrape bills and etc. The security implications are very troubling when you stop to consider them.
 


the various direct connections from Quicken and other financial programs essentially work by scripting and screen-scraping the web-based interaction
This is one of those factoids that has at least some truth but is also ambiguous. It seems that's what Mint may do, at least in part, and Mint has long been a part of Intuit. Quicken, once Intuit's main offering, has been sold off to a buyout company.

This article is the closest I could find to explain screen scraping, and I'm pretty sure it was about, or mostly about, Intuit's Mint aggregation program, less, if any, about Quicken the application:
American Banker - 11/12/15 said:
The Truth Behind the Hubbub Over Screen Scraping
Many PFM and other data aggregators obtain customer data by logging in to customers' online banking accounts, using their user names and passwords, and literally copying and pasting the bank account information into their own or partners' apps, usually tools for helping consumers manage their money.
Digging deeper, none of these Quicken methods seems to be "screen scraping"; however, it really isn't clear what Express Web Connect (Windows) or its Mac equivalent, Quicken Connect, is doing. Some details in the link below:
Quicken Help'' said:
Connection Types in Quicken
There are three ways Quicken interacts with your bank:
  1. Express Web Connect (Quicken Connect in Quicken for Mac)
  2. Direct Connect
  3. Web Connect
Ironically, the Moneydance website has the best explanation of "Express Web Connect / Quicken Connect" I found. As I read it, screen scraping, in the sense of copying a transaction set from a display, isn't involved, though, given that every financial institution seems to place the "download" button in different locations, it may be in that sense.
InfiniteKind (Moneydance) Knowledgebase said:
Why doesn't Moneydance support Express Web Connect?
... Quicken's server essentially pretends to be a human and logs into your bank's website for your. It will navigate to wherever the transaction file download link is and download the QFX, OFX or QIF file for you. The Quicken server aggregates these downloads and stores them on its own server. Quicken's server will do this on a regular basis, typically every day. Then when you run Quicken, instead of connecting to the bank's server directly, Quicken connects to the Quicken server and retrieves everything it has ready for you.
 


This is one of those factoids that has at least some truth but is also ambiguous. It seems that's what Mint may do, at least in part, and Mint has long been a part of Intuit. Quicken, once Intuit's main offering, has been sold off to a buyout company.
The Quicken connections to download transactions from financial institutions don't screen-scrape. But Quicken 2018 added an "eBill" feature that downloads PDFs of bills.


It isn't clear if Quicken is only downloading the same PDF that the biller already provides or in some cases generating the PDF from screen-scraping.

Note, however, that back when ex-Mint CEO and Founder Aaron Patzer gained control of the Quicken product, his vision for the future of Quicken was that it should be more Mint-like. He didn't think there was any future in a desktop product that stored transactions; he thought that the product should just do online queries (i.e., screen scraping) to the source institutions, like Mint. He was quite dismissive of people who wanted a product with transaction entry, calling them "older boomers and seniors".

I can't find the original email where he said that, but there are two articles that were linked from MacInTouch in 2010:
 


ex-Mint CEO and Founder Aaron Patzer gained control of the Quicken product, his vision for the future of Quicken was that it should be more Mint-like
Back in the day, before we all realized just how much "web companies" wanted to scrape our personal data, I knew people who signed up for Mint and gave Mint every scintilla of financial data they had: bank accounts, broker accounts, mortgages, credit cards. It seemed a disaster waiting to happen, as, if Mint were compromised, it wouldn't be just one of their accounts that a hacker could raid, but all.

For the same reason, this particular luddite won't use a web-connected password manager, or store passwords in a browser.

The InfiniteKind / Moneydance page about Quicken "Express Connect" says it all:
Why does Moneydance not support Express Web Connect?

To use Express Web Connect you have to give the usernames and passwords you use to log into your bank websites to Intuit. Intuit then stores these on their own servers. Intuit has to have your passwords on their servers to be able to connect to the bank on your behalf.

For the technically inclined, an important piece of information here is that Intuit cannot just store a hash of your password on their server. They must store your actual password in order to be able to use it. Storing actual passwords on servers, rather than a hash of a password, is considered extremely bad practice from computer security perspective, but in order to provide this service Intuit has no choice.

By only using Direct Connect, we can guarantee that your username, password and financial data only ever exists with your bank or on your own personal computer, and at no point are your details stored on another server.
 


I also believe that Quicken fetches information by scripting web-based user interaction. They seem to use a farm of Windows NT machines (quite probably virtualized on some hosting provider).
When you create a new account in Quicken, it asks for your login credentials and password. Quicken sends these to its cloud servers so they can screen-scrape bills and etc. The security implications are very troubling when you stop to consider them.
Screen scraping would fail for any financial institution that requires more than user name and password to access your data on their website. For example, my bank requires a PIN after you're logged into their website before you can see your data: every time I log in, I have to provide that PIN. Quicken does not have my PIN. Or if your financial institution requires 2-factor authentication whenever you log in from a new device, that would also fail if Quicken tried to access your data on your behalf.
 


I have Quicken 2019 Deluxe. I bank with Suntrust.

I have seen error messages on occasion when Suntrust changes something. The error messages refer to scraping.

I guess Suntrust doesn't want to license code from Quicken.
 


I have Quicken 2019 Deluxe. I bank with Suntrust. I have seen error messages on occasion when Suntrust changes something. The error messages refer to scraping. I guess Suntrust doesn't want to license code from Quicken.
Are you using Direct Connect to download transactions from Suntrust?

Direct Connect uses the OFX protocol to communicate with the bank. Quicken is actually communicating with a OFX server provided by the bank or by a third-party that provides OFX services to the bank. Quicken sends a request for information to the OFX server. That server collects the information and replies to Quicken with the data in the OFX format.

How does the OFX server get the information from the bank? That is entirely up to how the bank (or third party) has designed the OFX back-end. It is absolutely possible that the back-end is using a screen-scraping process to extract the transactions from the bank's web portal, rather than a more direct method. However this isn't Quicken doing the screen-scraping, it is the OFX server, which is out of Quicken's control.

(This isn't a security or privacy issue; the OFX server and its methods of extracting data are, or should be, within the bank’s secure network. It is just an implementation detail of how their OFX server obtains the data.)

The OFX server can run into errors, and when it does, it can pass back error information in the OFX data. This, again, is under the control of the OFX server. If it wants to pass back an error about screen-scraping, it can.

I've seen this with my own bank. Their OFX server has a bug. The OFX standard says that if you request more data than can be provided, it should provide as much as it can, without an error. For example, if Quicken requests 10 years of transactions, but the bank can only give back 1 year, you should get back the 1 year. But what my bank does is give an error because the request exceeds the limits of their online web portal.

The ironic thing is that my bank swears that they don't have an OFX server; they claim it is actually Quicken doing screen-scraping. In reality their OFX server is run by a firm that provides OFX services to other companies. That firm is another division of my bank!
 


On Dec 11, Quicken access to some specific financial institutions broke. The symptom is that Quicken reports OFX Error #1 ("Unable to communicate with financial institution name") when attempting to interact for downloading transactions.

I've been working my way through Quicken's support service for about a week. Quicken folks took lots of information, including downloading various diagnostic files from my computer. Eventually, I was told this problem had to be escalated to a higher level, after which I heard nothing.

Today, I called my financial institution (Raymond James) support, and got a substantively useful answer, which implicates a recent Apple security/Catalina update. A senior Raymond James IT support person told me this is a known problem dating back to the most recent Apple security update (he didn't mention which one), and that Quicken, Raymond James and Apple experts have been working hard to solve it. He said the Apple update had interfered with the interface between Quicken and Raymond James (naturally, he didn't know if this is affecting other financial institutions, also), and that many Mac customers are affected. He could not offer an ETA for a resolution, but assured me that everyone involved is very eager to resolve it. (Year-end, of course, is an especially important "moment" for both financial institutions and their customers.)

I will report further if there are new developments.
 



I left Quicken for Moneydance several years back and found it to be a very good change given the poor state of Quicken back then. However, Moneydance remains, oddly, Java based with a consequently unattractive, ungainly, un-Mac user interface. Rock solid database, however, in my experience, unlike my bad memories of frequent Quicken corruption.

Recently I experienced total radio silence from Moneydance tech support regarding online banking problems. After over a month of this went by I experimented with migrating to Banktivity 7 (formerly iBank).

For what it's worth, I find Banktivity much more polished and sophisticated than Moneydance. The online banking interface, including bill pay, is far superior, and it just works. They have live chat support. I used it once already for a question about reports. I had my answer in ten minutes.

I'd urge anyone dissatisfied with their financial software to consider Banktivity. It's early days for me but so far I'm very happy with it.
 


Is Banktivity cloud-based or based entirely on your computer? I could not find a clear answer on their web page, but features such as use of multiple machines makes it sound cloud-based.
 


I've been experimenting with the Ubuntu variant of HomeBank. It is also available for Windows and macOS through Macports.
HomeBank
HomeBank is a free software (as in "free speech" and also as in "free beer") that will assist you to manage your personal accounting.
It is designed to easy to use and be able to analyse your personal finance and budget in detail using powerful filtering tools and beautiful charts.
HomeBank imports/exports .csv and .qif I've been custom-formatting spreadsheets to facilitate categorizing bulk entries, saving the processed data range to .csv, then importing to HomeBank. It would be possible to stop there, though I've gone further and exported from HomeBank to .qif and imported into Quicken 2007.

That's under-utilizing HomeBank's features, including its ability to auto-assign payees and/or categories.
 


Is Banktivity cloud-based or based entirely on your computer? I could not find a clear answer on their web page, but features such as use of multiple machines makes it sound cloud-based.
Your choice. I have my data file stored locally, but I could upload it if I want access on other devices.
 


On Dec 11, Quicken access to some specific financial institutions broke. ...
On Monday, December 23, Quicken connectivity to Raymond James was restored, and users received notices within Quicken of the need to re-connect their associated accounts. The process was easy and familiar, and the restoration was welcome, but the uncertainty at year's end was uncomfortable.

In my case, all accounts re-connected fine, and succeeded in downloading all the transactions missed since the failure on Dec 10. No data appears to have been lost.
 


A mystery has been why Quicken 2007's automatic backup function doesn't work if the data file is located on an APFS volume. Is it a bug in APFS?

The answer is that Quicken 2007 is making an assumption about the order in which file names are returned by file system calls. The order is different in APFS:
Apple said:
Apple File System Guide: Frequently Asked Questions
Some differences between how APFS and HFS+ handle filenames include the following:
  • Calling readdir(2) on a directory in APFS returns filenames in hash order, whereas HFS+ returns filenames in lexicographical order.
Lexicographical order essentially means alphabetized by the file name. It isn't clear exactly why this breaks Quicken 2007; all we know is that Quicken isn't getting the file names returned in the order it expects.

APFS is allowed to change the order because Unix file I/O doesn't require the files to be returned in lexicographical order.
BSD Library Functions Manual said:
readdir Mojave man page
Note that the order of the directory entries vended by readdir() is not specified. Some filesystems may return entries in lexicographic sort order and others may not.
 


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