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My internet keeps cutting in and out, fairly rapidly. Not really down, but in and out. My wireless service (WOW) says their info says that I receive strong signal into the modem. That appears to be true.

I ran a wireless diagnostic on my laptop and received the following disconcerting report:

Conflicting Country Codes
A nearby wireless router has been detected which is identifying itself as originating from a country which conflicts with your current settings. This may prevent your Mac from automatically re-joining a previously joined Wi-Fi network.

Certain wireless routers have the ability to identify the country they are designed to work in, this is called the Country Code. Wireless routers should only be used in the country they were originally obtained from. Failure to do scan result in performance and reliability issues for nearby wireless clients.

If possible, contact the network owner to resolve the problem.

Additionally, verify that Location Services is enabled on your Mac to ensure the correct country code is adopted based on your physical location.

The following nearby networks conflict with your current country code (US): ashamed (74:da:da:30:98:79) - NA

I am reasonably savvy with computers, but this stumps me. What does this mean? I have an Eero, US bought router (and it has the correct country code) but how can this other router interfere with my network? (I do have it password protected.) Can anyone explain this in low tech terms; any suggestions on what to do? Thanks!
 


I think this article explains the issue pretty clearly:

https://www.howtogeek.com/211993/how-to-fix-conflicting-country-codes-and-improve-your-macs-wi-fi/

It seems, unfortunately, the only real solution is to knock on neighbors' doors until you find the offending router and get them to fix it.

You should probably confirm first that it is actually the WiFi that is the issue. I would suggest connecting your laptop to your router via Ethernet and disable WiFi. If your connectivity issues disappear, then it is indeed the WiFi that is at fault. And if it is the WiFI, and your WiFi works normally at other locations (for example, Starbucks), then it sounds like this Country Code thing could indeed be a prime candidate for causing your issues at home.
 


I think this article explains the issue pretty clearly:

https://www.howtogeek.com/211993/how-to-fix-conflicting-country-codes-and-improve-your-macs-wi-fi/

It seems, unfortunately, the only real solution is to knock on neighbors' doors until you find the offending router and get them to fix it.

You should probably confirm first that it is actually the WiFi that is the issue. I would suggest connecting your laptop to your router via Ethernet and disable WiFi. If your connectivity issues disappear, then it is indeed the WiFi that is at fault. And if it is the WiFI, and your WiFi works normally at other locations (for example, Starbucks), then it sounds like this Country Code thing could indeed be a prime candidate for causing your issues at home.
Todd, Thanks for the suggested test and great article. I will check these things out.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Folks might want to reboot their routers, at the very minimum, because of Russian "VPNFilter" malware....
Reuters said:
FBI warns Russians hacked hundreds of thousands of routers
The FBI warned on Friday that Russian computer hackers had compromised hundreds of thousands of home and office routers and could collect user information or shut down network traffic.

The U.S. law enforcement agency urged the owners of many brands of routers to turn them off and on again and download updates from the manufacturer to protect themselves.
 


Folks might want to reboot their routers, at the very minimum....
More technical information, including a list of affected devices here.
Ars Technica said:
FBI tells router users to reboot now to kill malware infecting 500k devices
  • Linksys E1200
  • Linksys E2500
  • Linksys WRVS4400N
  • Mikrotik RouterOS for Cloud Core Routers: Versions 1016, 1036, and 1072
  • Netgear DGN2200
  • Netgear R6400
  • Netgear R7000
  • Netgear R8000
  • Netgear WNR1000
  • Netgear WNR2000
  • QNAP TS251
  • QNAP TS439 Pro
  • Other QNAP NAS devices running QTS software
  • TP-Link R600VP
 



I duly dug into my files, figured out what kind of router Verizon supplied for FiOS (FiOS Quantum Gateway), managed to find a copy of the manual and figure out how to reboot the router. But the Verizon manual supplies no instructions on downloading firmware, saying they automatically download it to the router. Nor was I able to find anything on the Verizon help site (now rather hard to reach thanks the way they handed off their email servers and separated them from the Help system). Did anyone see any information from Verizon about this whole security mess? I have email from my Verizon account forwarded to another account, so I'm wondering if Verizon sent a notice that got swallowed by a spam filter, or just ignored the whole thing.
 


Amusingly, to keep my [piece of junk] Asus router running properly, I have it set to reboot automatically every night.

I was a little surprised, by the way, to see the highly regarded Microtik routers on the “hacked” list.

I have seen nothing from anyone but MacInTouch and Ars Technica, who had good details on the issue, and then mainstream sites essentially repeating the FBI warning, free of context or intelligence (and not suggesting anyone update firmware, ever — something which I have to do manually on my Asus, since it can never contact the mother ship to do it. It can find out if there is new firmware, but when you try to auto-download, it claims it can't reach Asus, and then you have to reboot it before you can get in and do it manually. Firmware's just as rubbish as any other mainstream router).

Verizon does indeed automatically download firmware to keep their routers updated. Last time I looked, they had the passwords printed on a label on the router itself, so you can usually go to 192.168.1.1 or 192.168.0.1 and get into it.
 


I've got Verizon FIOS and just checked my Verizon email, nothing from them about the router problem. Was wondering about rebooting the router -- I assume it means more than just powering it off/on.
 


I've got Verizon FIOS and just checked my Verizon email, nothing from them about the router problem. Was wondering about rebooting the router -- I assume it means more than just powering it off/on.
Nope. Shut off, turn on. (Or unplug, replug if there's no on/off switch.)
 



I was a little surprised, by the way, to see the highly regarded Microtik routers on the “hacked” list.
MicroTik's vulnerability was fixed over a year ago (March 2017) as part of the v6.38.5 RouterOS update, so only those who neglect updates would be affected.
 


You have to log into a router gateway page and use the advanced feature to find the reboot. It does something more than just pushing the button because I had to reset some settings afterwards.
Routers/modems vary, but in typical terminology, "reboot" and "reset" mean two different things. You can reboot using the on/off switch, or pulling the router's plug, and waiting a few seconds; that may restore a dropped connection, but your saved configuration settings are probably not affected.

On the other hand, for more serious problems (i.e. not just a dropped connection), you may need a reset. There may be a software method for this (as in your case); the hardware method typically involves a straightened paperclip or other pointy thing -- you press it into a little hole on the side or bottom of the modem, which presses the recessed button inside. You have to hold it down for some specified period of time. I haven't had to do this in a long time so I don't remember whether the modem is supposed to be off or on when you do this. A reset restores the router/modem/firewall/etc. to its initial factory settings; hopefully you've recorded all your configuration options somewhere (I find screenshots and brief text descriptions in a document work well for this) because you'll need to restore all your old settings afterwards.

In other words, a reset is a much bigger deal than a reboot.
 


+1 to Jonas S. If you have the quite-large Verizon routers, they definitely have the paper clip switch for resets, and on mine (FIOS) they printed the default password on a sticker on the router.

Thanks, Neil Maller, for the clarification. I have a Microtik on order, since my Asus is dying after just three years.
 


How "important" do people think it is to "reset" (rather than merely reboot) our routers? Reset really is a much more anxiety-producing procedure, because of the need to re-enter manually all those settings in "router world's" ridiculously unfriendly user interface environment (featuring all those unintelligible acronyms) ;)
 


I have the known vulnerable QNAP TS251 running as a music server for my Sonos network. It is behind the Apple Extreme router, and I don't use it for any other purpose. It has a stupid complex administrative password, and I always stay current on the operating system and firmware. In a paroxysm of caution, I've rebooted, scanned it for malware, and even set it to reject any attempt to log in from the full domain ranges of the published IP addresses of the second stage. Still, with Sonos' lagging security practices, I remain a little nervous. I'm just a casual user, not terribly knowledgable about security settings, and for that reason I've not set it up for any kind of remote access, personal cloud storage, etc. It is a very capable device and seems fairly well supported, but I know there are a lot smarter people out there than me and I have no confidence in my own efforts to secure it from attack. I definitely exceeded my needs for a music server in acquiring it!
 


How "important" do people think it is to "reset" (rather than merely reboot) our routers? Reset really is a much more anxiety-producing procedure, because of the need to re-enter manually all those settings in "router world's" ridiculously unfriendly user interface environment (featuring all those unintelligible acronyms) ;)
I found what appears to be an FBI press release that says reboot:

I say "appears" only because it's not on an FBI site, it's on a different government site that I reached from a link on an fbi.gov page.

I still have heard nothing official from Verizon about whether or not their system actually updates firmware automatically, as the manual mentioned above claimed. Has anyone on Verizon FiOS seen anything from Verizon on this whole mess? So far it looks like a total fail on their part.
 


I still have heard nothing official from Verizon about whether or not their system actually updates firmware automatically, as the manual mentioned above claimed. Has anyone on Verizon FiOS seen anything from Verizon on this whole mess? So far it looks like a total fail on their part.
Verizon does push firmware updates into their routers. Back when I was a FiOS customer, I would occasionally notice UI changes on its web interface and (much less frequently) new features appear. And occasionally some bugs.

But I don't know how often they do this, nor could I say how long it will take for them to fix the vulnerability being exploited here (if ever, and assuming that their router actually is vulnerable.)
 


I have the known vulnerable QNAP TS251 running as a music server for my Sonos network. It is behind the Apple Extreme router, and I don't use it for any other purpose.
Here is my suggestion: Add a "burner" 2.5" hard drive to your AirPort Extreme and use that to store a copy of your music collection. Use the Extreme to share the content of the drive, and enable user authentication. Add a Sonos account to the hard drive and then direct the Sonos to the hard drive on the Extreme. Even slow 2.5" spinners that get their power via the Extreme's USB port work just fine.

Afterwards, tighten protocol security on the QNAP to SMB2 or higher. Whenever you add musical content to the QNAP, run Carbon Copy Cloner to make a copy onto the drive on your Extreme. Very quick, easy to set up. Granted, a few more steps, but it protects your data from a known attack vector with un-patched issues: SMBv1. If the drive on your Extreme gets hosed due to a hack, your canary in the coalmine just paid for itself.

Unfortunately, patching known security issues just does not seem to be a priority over at Sonos right now. While the CEO claims per Twitter that a SMB upgrade is on the to-do list, he hasn't shared where it is on the list, or what the expected release date is. To me, this sort of attitude re: security is not acceptable, especially when users have been asking about it for years.

Perhaps, secretive Sonos has been working on a upgrade behind the scenes. After all, the development team over at Microsoft that 'owns' SMB has offered to help... upgrades to the relevant Linux networking stack have been available for years... yet, despite applicable Sonos teams being 'aware', nothing has happened.

I've given up on them fixing it, because it's a NAS-related issue. The current development focus at Sonos seems to be squarely elsewhere, i.e. streaming, Alexa integration, ducking, Airplay 2, and all that jazz. NAS' are associated with Sonos' early adopters, and that market is now saturated. "No need to address that issue, the future is streaming!", or something like that.

FWIW, Bluesound offers SMB3 support and (unlike Sonos) the user can download, store, and apply applicable firmware as needed - i.e. you actually own and control your equipment! And, unlike Sonos, its competitors have yet to intentionally disable user-owned equipment (like the CR100 controller, which as of firmware 8.5 is no longer recognized by Sonos zone players or speakers).

To me, Sonos' approach is a different security risk: You only get to use your Sonos equipment as long as the company deems fit... unless you go to extremes to 'protect' it from 'upgrades'. Has anyone else here have had to protect their equipment functionality by preventing upgrades?

P.S.: Blocking upgrades will only work as long as your Sonos equipment doesn't have a system crash necessitating a factory reset, you don't upgrade your iOS Sonos app, you don't pair a new smartphone/tablet/whatever with a different revision of the Sonos app, and you don't attempt to add more Sonos equipment (controllers or speakers). Any of these events can trigger a site-wide update requirement to restore system functionality. Thus, any Sonos equipment slated for obsolescence by Sonos will live on borrowed time, by design. Caveat Emptor.
 


SANS Internet Storm Center:
Resetting Your Router the Paranoid (=Right) Way
You probably heard the advice given earlier this week to reset your router due to some malware referred to as "VPNFilter" infecting a large number of routers. I do not want to second guess this advice, but instead, outline a couple of issues with "resetting" a router.

First of all: Pretty much all router malware (Mirai variants, TheMoon and various Linux Perl/bash scripts affecting routers) will not survive a simple power cycle of the router. However, the vulnerability that allowed access to the malware will. Secondly, some configuration changes may survive. In particular changes to DNS settings that are often done without actual malware, but by using CSRF vulnerabilities in the routers web-based admin interface.

My main problem with having thousands of users reset their routers to factory default settings is that they inadvertently may reset it to use a simple default password.
...
For a simple reset that will take care of > 99% of malware I see on routers:
  1. Reboot the router
  2. Verify that you use a strong password (even for access from your own network)
  3. Disable remote admin features
  4. Verify the DNS settings
 


Like many, I decided to replace a pair of AirPort Time Capsules (main and extender) with something new rather than waiting until one of them failed.

The big problem was how to continue to use the Time Machine disks in them and there weren’t any good answers on the Internet. Here is how I did it so that other MacInTouch readers can benefit:

I powered down both AirPorts and completely installed my new Linksys EA9500 router using the same SSID as the AirPorts. After the Linksys was up and running, I connected the master AirPort to my Mac with an Ethernet cable and used Airport Utility to make several changes to the configuration: Bridge mode, don’t broadcast the SSID, no guest network, disable 5GHz and a selected new SSID.

I connected the main AirPort's Internet port to a spare port on the new Linksys router and powered it up. I then connected the extender AirPort to my Mac via Ethernet and just changed the SSID to the same as the master AirPort. The other changes apparently were made automatically because those options weren’t visible in AirPort Utility.

[None of the] devices connecta to the two AirPorts wirelessly. While they talk to each other over Wi-Fi, the Macs that use their disks connect to the Linksys.

So my AirPort disks are still available to my Macs until they fail and I assume that I can connect a USB printer — but I haven’t tried that yet.
 


So my AirPort disks are still available to my Macs until they fail and I assume that I can connect a USB printer — but I haven’t tried that yet.
Update: I connected a USB printer to one of the Airports, and it's available to my Macs.
 


The article has a full list of targeted devices:
Ars Technica said:
VPNFilter malware infecting 500,000 devices is worse than we thought
Malware tied to Russia can attack connected computers and downgrade HTTPS.
... researchers from Cisco’s Talos security team say additional analysis shows that the malware is more powerful than originally thought and runs on a much broader base of models, many from previously unaffected manufacturers.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
More on the Russian VPNFilter router malware:
Sophos said:
Check your router – list of routers affected by VPNFilter just got bigger
The VPNFilter router malware, a giant-sized IoT botnet revealed two weeks ago, just went from bad to somewhat worse.

Originally thought to affect 15-20 mostly home/Soho routers and NAS devices made by Linksys, MikroTik, Netgear, TP-Link, and QNAP, this has now been expanded to include at least another 56 from Asus, D-Link, Huawei, Ubiquiti, UPVEL, and ZTE.

Talos gets this information by trying to determine the models on which VPNFilter has been detected but given the size of that job (affected devices number at least 500,000, probably more) the list is unlikely to be complete.

The updated alert confirms that VPNFilter has the ability to carry out man-in-the-middle interception of HTTP/S web traffic (something that SophosLabs own investigation of the malware concluded was highly likely), which means that it is not only able to monitor traffic and capture credentials but potentially deliver exploits to network devices too.
 



Ric Ford

MacInTouch
WPA3, a new generation of the wireless security standard, is gradually rolling out. (I don't expect it to be supported by Apple's abandoned AirPort product line.)
The Verge said:
Wi-Fi security is starting to get its biggest upgrade in over a decade
Wi-Fi devices have been using the same security protocol for over a decade. But today, that’ll begin to change: the Wi-Fi Alliance, which oversees adoption of the Wi-Fi standard, is beginning to certify products that support WPA3, the successor to the WPA2 security protocol that’s been in use since 2004.

The new protocol provides a number of additional protections for devices connected over Wi-Fi. One big improvement makes it harder for hackers to crack your password by guessing it over and over again, and another limits what data hackers can see even once they’ve uncovered the passcode. Nothing will change as far as users see it; you’ll still just type in your password and connect to the network.

WPA3 protections won’t just flip on overnight — in fact, it’s going to be a many-years-long process. First, you’ll have to buy a new router that supports WPA3 (or hope that your old one is updated to support it). The same goes for all your gadgets...
 


A client of mine asked about an Indiegogo startup campaign for a Firewalla Blue firewall/VPN server/ad blocker appliance designed to work in-line with your router - their example shows it connected in-line to an Apple Airport Extreme.

The Firewalla Blue, supporting gigabit connection speeds, looks to be an update to their already existing less-expensive FireWalla Red, available at Amazon.

Does anyone have experience with the existing Red model, or the company, Firewalla?

I welcome something lower cost and simpler for the home user than the business-targeted subscription model firewalls I am used to, and am curious about Firewalla's business support. Crowd-sourced funding of a firewall seems novel to me.
 


FYI, as part of their 8.6 release this week Sonos added a new music-sharing protocol for Windows to replace SMBv1.
Fascinating. HTTP file sharing... not HTTPS? I hope at least the password and login are secure, even if the streams are not?

Anyhow, given how transparent Sonos has been regarding fixing past flaws and how responsive they have been addressing SMBv1, my recommendation re: a local file library for Sonos stands: Treat any library that Sonos can interact with as expendable. My Sonos local library is on a bus-powered burner drive attached to an Airport Extreme. It gets updated from the NAS via Carbon Copy Cloner as I add content to the latter.

My router also blocks a lot of ports to Sonos and its sub-domains. It keeps my functional Sonos hardware from being "updated" out of its functional existence.

Based on a scan of Sonos community forum feedback, Version 9 of the firmware is so buggy that perhaps more users will elect to no longer update their firmware once they find a stable one. I don't need Alexa integration, and I like actually owning my equipment. Others seem to agree.

But if you want to own your equipment (not just the hardware), then Sonos is not the company for you. If you can't choose what firmware you get to run on your equipment, then you don't really own it. Sonos' competitors allow you to download and store firmware images for later use, so the hardware will stay functional indefinitely. Not so with Sonos. Caveat Emptor.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Beware of Linksys routers...
Talos said:
Linksys ESeries Multiple OS Command Injection Vulnerabilities
Multiple exploitable OS command injection vulnerabilities exist in the Linksys E Series line of routers. An attacker can exploit these bugs by sending an authenticated HTTP request to the network configuration. An attacker could then gain the ability to arbitrarily execute code on the machine.
...
Home routers have become one of the main targets for malicious attacks. Although these vulnerabilities require the attacker to have already authenticated with the device, the vulnerabilities are serious as they allow a potential attacker full control over the device, which may include installation of additional malicious code.

Widespread internet-of-things attacks such as Mirai and VPNFilter show that attackers will keep their focus on discovering new vulnerabilities which would allow them to infect devices and conduct large scale as well as targeted attacks. These attacks are more difficult to detect and protection is available only after their manufacturers update the firmware and patch the vulnerability.

Keeping the device firmware up to date is crucial to avoid SOHO routers participating in a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack or becoming an infection vector in an attack targeted to your organization.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Microtik routers also have had major vulnerabilities:
Sophos said:
Unpatched routers bad, doubly unpatched routers worse – much, much worse!
... If you’re a Mikrotik user, skipping the latest patch leaves you at risk, but if you still haven’t applied the previous patch, you’re in double trouble.

With both patches missing, you’re open to an unauthenticated password disclosure bug that could then be chained with the newer authenticated remote code execution bug.

In other words, instead of anyone being able to get some access, or some people being able to get full access, anyone could get full access by pivoting from CVE-2018-14847 to CVE-2018-1156, the RCE flaw.
ZDNet said:
A mysterious grey-hat is patching people's outdated MikroTik routers
... CVE-2018-14847 is a very convenient vulnerability because it allows an attacker to bypass authentication and download the user database file. Attackers decrypt this file and then use one of the username & password combos to log into a remote device and make OS settings and run various scripts.

For the past five and a half months, the vulnerability has been mainly used to plant cryptojacking scripts on outdated MikroTik routers [1, 2] and to hijack DNS servers and later redirect user traffic towards malicious sites [1, 2].

This wouldn't be an issue, but MikroTik is one of today's most popular router brand. There are over two million MikroTik routers around the globe.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Add D-Link and more to the list:
Sophos said:
Serious D-Link router security flaws may never be patched
...
The issue of unpatched and never-to-be-patched routers has become a running theme. According to a recent American Consumer Institute (ACI) report, 155 out of 180 routers it analysed had unpatched flaws, equivalent to 172 each, 28% of which were rated high risk.

What’s irksome about the latest example of slow D-Link response is that it’s happened before in 2017 in an almost identical set of circumstances.

Different researcher, another group of older D-Link routers, but the same patchy response and outcome – the researcher reveals the flaws without fixes being available and little hope that they ever would be.

Our security advice is simple: when router makers say end of life, some of them really mean it.
 


Mikrotik routers also have had major vulnerabilities:
Which is a real shame, because I switched to their horrifically bad user interface to avoid the rubbish — but usable — software on normal routers.

Perhaps if Mikrotik didn't make it so freakin’ hard to auto-update (write a script, enter it, then figure out how to schedule it, but not by using the instructions because those don't actually work) — say, having an auto-update checkbox like everyone else — these vulnerabilities wouldn't be so bad. But they seem to have an attitude of “let's deliberately use different terms and make ordinary things hard to do, because then users can feel superior at having mastered their router.”
 


The firmware on my D-Link router was several years old and a few weeks ago I considered replacing the unit when I came across this site:

Router Security​


I read the article on a recommended enterprise-class router and purchased it:

Pepwave Surf SOHO Router​


So far I'm happy with its functionality and look forward to regular firmware updates by the manufacturer (next one should squash a password configuration bug).
 


I just read Jo Yoshida's link to the Router Security site. I must say, Mikrotik does not come out well, and it looks as though they are covering up incompetence with deliberate obscurity. (D-link does come out looking even worse.)


Again, some of the problem could be eliminated by adding a checkbox for daily firmware checks/updates.

Mikrotik did not allow auto-upgrade until version 6 — the current version — of their OS. If you want to amuse yourself, read the instructions:


You may notice that this process requires multiple routers at one installation. In short, you have to still manually upgrade at least one of our routers.

Buried underneath all that they have a suggestion to manually update the boot loader because, you know, that's so obvious, why would they include it in the graphic user interface or make it part of the regular instructions?

Anyone want a couple of lightly used Mikrotik routers?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
FYI:
Cnet said:
Verizon issues patch for vulnerabilities on millions of Fios routers
If you have a Verizon Fios Quantum Gateway router, get the latest update.

Verizon is sending out an update for millions of its routers after security researchers discovered vulnerabilities that could allow attackers to take over the devices.

On Tuesday, researchers from Tenable detailed three vulnerabilities with Verizon's Fios Quantum Gateway router. The security company said that it disclosed these security flaws to Verizon in December and that Verizon issued a fix on March 13.

Verizon said that a small percentage of its customers didn't get the update automatically and will still need a patch.

"We were recently made aware of three vulnerabilities related to login and password information on the Broadband Home Router Fios-G1100," a Verizon spokesman said in a statement. "As soon as we were made aware of these vulnerabilities, we took immediate action to remediate them and are issuing patches."

It was a particular type of router that didn't get the update. Verizon said that the people affected won't need to take any action. If the router's firmware is running version 02.02.00.13, they're up-to-date and safe from the vulnerabilities.
 



Looks like there is no need to worry about embracing the new WPA3 standard for your next WiFi router.
Ars Technica said:
Serious flaws leave WPA3 vulnerable to hacks that steal Wi-Fi passwords
The next-generation Wi-Fi Protected Access protocol released 15 months ago was once hailed by key architects as resistant to most types of password-theft attacks that threatened its predecessors. On Wednesday, researchers disclosed several serious design flaws in WPA3 that shattered that myth and raised troubling new questions about the future of wireless security, particularly among low-cost Internet-of-things devices.
 




Log into your Verizon router and click System Monitoring along the top row. The firmware version is displayed there.
I checked my router after seeing this and found that it was not updated so I had a web chat with a Verizon representative. He assured me that the firmware would be updated automatically and when I checked yesterday it was now 02.02.00.14. Note this is higher that what was previously posted here.

I also have an Actiontec 802.11ac Wireless Network Extender with Gigabit Internet and Bonded MoCA (model WCB6200Q) to extend my wireless coverage via my home's wired coax since the FIOS router is in the basement and I wasn't getting adequate coverage in the far corner of the second floor. I checked its firmware and found that it was also out of date. The current version is 1.1.10.20a.t. You can obtain this at
Installation was straightforward except that the WCB6200Q needs to be connected to coax and you need a wired ethernet connection from a computer to the WCB62000Q. Since most relatively current portables lack wired ethernet, this could be a problem. I ended up using an original 2006 MacBook that I have lying around.
 


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