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...All others get sent directly to voicemail, and as we know, most scammers don't leave voicemail messages. ...
Many do, however. Dear sweetheart Rachel and her sisters from Cardholder Services, and a few others, like robot "Windows Technical Support" callers, do indeed drop voicemail messages, both on my iPhone and on the house (yes I still have one) landline.
#Make.It.Stop.
 


Many do, however. Dear sweetheart Rachel and her sisters from Cardholder Services, and a few others, like robot "Windows Technical Support" callers, do indeed drop voicemail messages, both on my iPhone and on the house (yes I still have one) landline.
#Make.It.Stop.
I love it when they leave a message with valid contact information. It gives me enough evidence to file a report with law enforcement.

I don't know if these reports do any good, but I definitely know that the legal system can't take any action unless there are complaints on file, so I file them whenever I have enough information to do so.
 


Many do, however. Dear sweetheart Rachel and her sisters from Cardholder Services, and a few others, like robot "Windows Technical Support" callers, do indeed drop voicemail messages, both on my iPhone and on the house (yes I still have one) landline.
#Make.It.Stop.
Many of these bots are too stupid to tell the difference between a human and an answering machine, so they start playing their message as soon as the answering machine picks up the call, talking through the outgoing message, so only the last part of their message winds up on the recording.
 


Probably like most of us here, I use SpamSieve for my emails. Once the emails arrive, SpamSieve reads through them looking for criteria I set, and sorts according to that.

Why can't text message software have a similar tool/feature, that works the same way? I'd love to never see emails addressed to "Maximinio" or offering "Russian Beauties" ever again.
 


I love it when they leave a message with valid contact information. It gives me enough evidence to file a report with law enforcement.
I don't know if these reports do any good, but I definitely know that the legal system can't take any action unless there are complaints on file, so I file them whenever I have enough information to do so.
The problem is that many of these spams are from off-shore sites with spoofed phone numbers so that they appear to be local. That puts them beyond effective legal action.
 


The problem is that many of these spams are from off-shore sites with spoofed phone numbers so that they appear to be local. That puts them beyond effective legal action.
You're absolutely correct. Which is why I don't bother filing reports if all I have is a Caller ID number.

But sometimes they leave a voice-mail message including valid contact information, like a phone number I can call to connect with them. When this happens, I will call the number (to confirm it is going to the scammers) and then include it in my report to law enforcement.
 


I use Nomorobo for my seldom-used Vonage home phone, and it has has done a good job of sending spam calls to the cornfield after 2 rings. Within the past 4–6 weeks, I now get an AI voice announcing "Call from (666-666-6666)…" after the two rings. It is a lot more intrusive and disturbing than the two rings followed by silence.

I can't figure out who is to blame. There appears to be no new Vonage setting that causes the voice announcement to occur. Nor do I see any Nomorobo setting that would control this. I'm getting these every day, sometimes several per day or in quick succession. Is there some new trick that the spammers are using?

I emailed Vonage support a few minutes ago, but of course have not heard from them yet.
 


I use Nomorobo for my seldom-used Vonage home phone, and it has has done a good job of sending spam calls to the cornfield after 2 rings. Within the past 4–6 weeks, I now get an AI voice announcing "Call from (666-666-6666)…" after the two rings. It is a lot more intrusive and disturbing than the two rings followed by silence.
For me, Nomorobo nukes a call after one ring if it's deemed spam. If Nomorobo passes a call, it keeps ringing, and my phone system announces the Caller ID. Did you get a new phone? Or accidentally enable voice announcing on your old one?
 


For me, Nomorobo nukes a call after one ring if it's deemed spam. If Nomorobo passes a call, it keeps ringing, and my phone system announces the Caller ID. Did you get a new phone? Or accidentally enable voice announcing on your old one?
It's an old phone, a Panasonic cordless with answering machine. The handset display is sometimes wonky, as in no text showing up, so I can't work through whatever menu options it may have. I have Nomorobo set to two rings because that gives the answering machine time to kick in. I feel like I must have accidentally enabled something somewhere, but I have no clue how or where. I don't see anything on the handset or base that would set turn this "feature" on. I should probably replace it at this point for other reasons, but it would be a bummer to discover that the problem isn't just something that accidentally got changed on the old one. I just tested it by calling it from my iPhone, and it announced my call, too. So it isn't a new spam caller thing.
 


I use MagicJack's call screening, which requires the caller to enter a randomly chosen number between 0 and 9. No entry or the wrong entry? The call is ended. Correct entry? The call is put through and actually rings. This has completely ended robocalls on my two MagicJack lines.

For my T-Mobile phone, I use conditional forwarding to one of my MagicJack nunbers. If the incoming call has an ID I recognize, I'll answer it. If not (unrecognized or no ID), I push it to my voicemail; but because of the conditional forwarding of unanswered calls to the MagicJack nunber, I get the call screening, so, again, no more robocallers leaving messages.

I provide my cellphone number to anyone who might legitimately robocall me (like a scheduled callback from a doctor or a company); I then recognize the ID and can answer it. If I erroneously send a live person to my call screening, well, he can leave a voice message (which MagicJack forwards to my email so I see it on my cellphone).

Nothing extra required. I'm only using the existing services provided by MagicJack and T-Mobile.
 


It's an old phone, a Panasonic cordless with answering machine. The handset display is sometimes wonky, as in no text showing up, so I can't work through whatever menu options it may have. I have Nomorobo set to two rings because that gives the answering machine time to kick in. I feel like I must have accidentally enabled something somewhere, but I have no clue how or where. I don't see anything on the handset or base that would set turn this "feature" on. I should probably replace it at this point for other reasons, but it would be a bummer to discover that the problem isn't just something that accidentally got changed on the old one. I just tested it by calling it from my iPhone, and it announced my call, too. So it isn't a new spam caller thing.
I, too, have an old Panasonic wireless with answering machine. Whenever I get a legit call, the autovoice announces "Call from {attempts to pronounce caller ID}."

Nomorobo-filtered calls only ring once, and the auto voice never kicks in. So I'm pretty sure it's your phone, not Nomorobo, that's responsible. You can probably find the manual for your phone online. On my model, settings are changed by scrolling through a menu on a handset, not the base.

I've been using Nomorobo for a couple years, and I can't overstate the difference it's made. I used to get multiple spam calls every day. A few still sneak through, but it's only a fraction of what I used to endure.
 


I, too, have an old Panasonic wireless with answering machine. Whenever I get a legit call, the autovoice announces "Call from {attempts to pronounce caller ID}."

Nomorobo-filtered calls only ring once, and the auto voice never kicks in. So I'm pretty sure it's your phone, not Nomorobo, that's responsible. You can probably find the manual for your phone online. On my model, settings are changed by scrolling through a menu on a handset, not the base.

I've been using Nomorobo for a couple years, and I can't overstate the difference it's made. I used to get multiple spam calls every day. A few still sneak through, but it's only a fraction of what I used to endure.
My answering machine is set to respond after 2 rings. Until recently, if Nomorobo had intercepted the call, I heard only the two rings, nothing further. I have decided it’s time to retire the old phone, which has been in use for at least 10-12 years. I know I didn’t change any settings by scrolling through the options on its handset screen, because the screen has been shy about displaying information for years, and has transitioned from intermittent display to displaying absolutely nothing.

I tentatively ruled out spammers somehow fooling Nomorobo when I test-called it from my cell. The Panasonic announced my name and number. It did not do this in the past when legit calls went to the answering machine. When I get the new phone, I will check my Nomorobo settings again and hope for the best.
 


I use MagicJack's call screening, which requires the caller to enter a randomly chosen number between 0 and 9. No entry or the wrong entry? The call is ended. Correct entry? The call is put through and actually rings. This has completely ended robocalls on my two MagicJack lines.
Sounds like a great plan. The only problem is that there are (sadly) legitimate robocalls as well.

I frequently get robocalls from my pharmacy (letting me know that a prescription is available for pickup) or from my HVAC service (reminding me of an upcoming appointment) and from several other companies I do business with.

I'd rather they have a human call me, but the robocall is better than no notification at all.
 


I tentatively ruled out spammers somehow fooling Nomorobo when I test-called it from my cell. The Panasonic announced my name and number. It did not do this in the past when legit calls went to the answering machine. When I get the new phone, I will check my Nomorobo settings again and hope for the best.
My Panasonic phone is considerably newer than yours. I don't use Nomorobo, but I can tell you this:

For me, the phone announces all calls, whether they go to the answering machine or not. I also did not have to turn this on; on the contrary, if I didn't want the voice announcement, I'd have to turn it off. It is possible that my phone behaves differently from yours by virtue of being newer, but I don't think the answering machine has anything to do with the call being announced or not.
 


Sounds like a great plan. The only problem is that there are (sadly) legitimate robocalls as well.
I frequently get robocalls from my pharmacy (letting me know that a prescription is available for pickup) or from my HVAC service (reminding me of an upcoming appointment) and from several other companies I do business with.
I'd rather they have a human call me, but the robocall is better than no notification at all.
We have "dial 1-9 to connect" but only for numbers that are not in our address book. It takes a bit of maintenance (I go through the incoming call list each month to look for "new" numbers). Then most people get a phone tree "dial 1 for Chris, 2 for Pat, etc." which also messes up most legitimate robocallers. When I can identify those numbers, I set them to ring through directly. New "legitimate" robocalls generally do not get through until I notice them in the last month's call list. Oh well.

This is all done through the features of callcentric.com which provides our VOiP service. Maybe not the absolutely lowest price, but I like the feature set a lot. Calls to me ring through the land-line and also my cell number. I can use the home landline and have it give my business or cell number as a Caller-ID. Voice-mail can be delivered as email attachments.

It took a bit of work to find, order, and set up our hardware (some Grandstream GS-HT812 2-line ATA devices like this Grandstream Powerful 2-Port ATA Gigabit NAT Router), but it has been well worth the added flexibility compared to our earlier Vonage line. Our kid's college dorm room is part of our phone system, and calls to his room also go to his cell.
 


Re: wireless landline phones, I have Panasonic DECT 6.0 systems at home and work. One great advantage over earlier brands: they use standard rechargeable and replaceable batteries. Great range. Only problem has been the wall warts. Thus far, I've just gotten around the ones that died (at home, not work yet) by moving phones around once a week. Need to look for "warts" compatible with the Panasonic charging cradles.

It is possible to add phones or replace units that die, if Panasonic still sells them, and, while I haven't exhausted every resource, the model at home doesn't seem to still be on offer. Answering machine component works well.

Message: "Hello, this is 555-5555. If you're not a telemarketer, leave a message."

Amazing how many hang up. The few (and robos) that start talking can be shut off by picking up and hanging up, if anyone's close to the handset. Get very few "real" calls, but I can attest the 911 number tied to address function is a lifesaver.
 


Re: wireless landline phones, I have Panasonic DECT 6.0 systems at home and work. One great advantage over earlier brands: they use standard rechargeable and replaceable batteries. Great range.
Yep. All true. And some models, like the one I have, have a built-in Call Block function capable of holding 250 entries, which can be single numbers, an area code and exchange, or even an entire area code. Works well, and you can block a call while it's still ringing. The numbers that used to nag me daily actually stopped calling!
 


Nigerian scamming goes full meta.
...We have been able to track down so many of this scam artist in various parts of west African countries which includes (NIGERIA, REPUBLIC OF BENIN, TOGO, GHANA CAMEROUN AND SENEGAL) and they are all in our custody here in Lagos Nigeria. We have been able to recover so much money from these scam artists. The United Nation Anti-crime commission and the United State Government have ordered the money recovered from the Scammers to be shared among 100 Lucky people around the globe.

This email is been directed to you because your email address was found in one of the scam Artists file and computer hard disk in our custody here in Nigeria. You are therefore being compensated with $2.5 Million Dollars. We have also arrested all those who claim that they are barristers, bank officials, Lottery Agents who has money for transfer or want you to be the next of kin of such funds which does not exist. Since your name appeared among the lucky beneficiaries who will receive a compensation of $2.5 Million, we have arranged your payment through our (KTT) Bank to Bank Telegraghic Tranfer center...
 





When I want to have fun, I use a script that I wrote for telemarketers who call: "Pennington County Sheriff's Office, Telemarketer Fraud Division, how can I help you?" They are gone in less than a second.
I had planned a similar response if I ever caught the scare scammer threatening "legal action in any court."

Hi, ___, I'm glad I caught you. This is George Harris of the FCC Department of Consumer Fraud Protection and Enforcement. I head a force of anti-fraud attorneys, cybercrime technicians and Federal Marshals. In a few seconds the techs will have your true phone number and physical location. The marshals should be there shortly with Federal warrants for your arrest. Have a nice day!

As in your case, I expect a hangup in seconds.
 


I check my Junk folder (mail.app) occasionally and am always amused/annoyed by the number of obvious phishing attempts from criminals attempting (badly) to pose as well known corporations. I usually take a few minutes and report the recent ones. I'm keeping a list of addresses for that undertaking and for your convenience will post it here:
Of course this list is but a start. I don't know how many of these companies take any real action, but it makes me feel better to report the bad guys. Usually there is no response. Sometimes I receive a stock "thank you" and "don't click on anything" reply. But I can't help thinking that if we all did this there might eventually be less of this crap. It's not a lot of work: right click—Forward as attachment, drag the appropriate address from the list.
 



I check my Junk folder (mail.app) occasionally and am always amused/annoyed by the number of obvious phishing attempts from criminals attempting (badly) to pose as well known corporations. I usually take a few minutes and report the recent ones. I'm keeping a list of addresses for that undertaking and for your convenience will post it here:
...
Another resource for fighting spammers is SpamCop. It parses email headers and generates abuse reports that can be sent to many ISPs with one click.
In addition to using the the above addresses and SpamCop, I also forward each message as an attachment to the following services that claim to attempt to prevent spam and/or phishing:
 


...I'm keeping a list of addresses for that undertaking and for your convenience will post it here...
Wouldn't it be nice if companies used a standard username for reporting fraud? Lists such as the one Fred keeps wouldn't be necessary, and people would find it easier to file a report. I would prefer 'abuse@' since it is generic, but any standard would be a great improvement over the current situation.
 


Wouldn't it be nice if companies used a standard username for reporting fraud? Lists such as the one Fred keeps wouldn't be necessary, and people would find it easier to file a report. I would prefer 'abuse@' since it is generic, but any standard would be a great improvement over the current situation.
Sadly, from my past experience in trying to report potential frauds, too many companies don't seem to care, and don't want to make it easy for customers to complain about anything.
 


Sadly, from my past experience in trying to report potential frauds, too many companies don't seem to care, and don't want to make it easy for customers to complain about anything.
Once upon a time, the e-mail admin was always "postmaster", the web admin was always "webmaster", and there were many other standard names in use. Some of them even codified by IETF standards.

Since then, however, things have changed. Corporations don't want third parties to be able to e-mail their administrators and standardized addresses tend to get spammed to death. So many organizations have switched to custom names, or they've deleted the addresses altogether (forcing others to use web-forms or chat-bots or other more controllable mechanisms for contact).

In many cases, the reasons are perfectly reasonable, but it does have the unfortunate side-effect of making access more difficult for people with a legitimate need to contact a system administrator.
 








Also, disabling auto-downloading of images won't tell the spammer that one's email address is legitimate....
In general, I agree it's a good idea to disable auto-downloading, but that practice can get you dropped from some mailing lists that keep track of who opens their mail by using 'web bugs' - single pixels that are auto-downloaded when the email is opened. Many people who use mailing services are not aware of how this works, so they think people who block auto-downloading are not reading mail on those lists.

While spammers use these tools to manage their mailings, so do legitimate opt-in mailing lists and other companies. I try to educate mailers, but you can't reach all of them. So I also download images once in a while from mailing lists I like to make sure they don't think I never read their mail.
 


In general, I agree it's a good idea to disable auto-downloading, but that practice can get you dropped from some mailing lists that keep track of who opens their mail by using 'web bugs' - single pixels that are auto-downloaded when the email is opened.
Doesn't that work also when the images are downloaded manually ("Load Remote Content" in Mail) after opening the mail message?
 


Doesn't that work also when the images are downloaded manually ("Load Remote Content" in Mail) after opening the mail message?
Actually, that's what I do - clicking on the "Load Remote Content" in Mail after opening the message. From my viewpoint, the real problem is how few people responsible for mailing lists understand how the software tries to ascertain if the email is read.
 



In general, I agree it's a good idea to disable auto-downloading, but that practice can get you dropped from some mailing lists that keep track of who opens their mail by using 'web bugs' - single pixels that are auto-downloaded when the email is opened. Many people who use mailing services are not aware of how this works, so they think people who block auto-downloading are not reading mail on those lists.
As one who uses such lists... Mailchimp, at least, warns that using web bugs is imperfect at best exactly because not everyone auto-loads images. Most mailing lists should not have a problem with your refusal to show images by default. Usually, they only get rid of people when they get a bounce message.
 


As one who uses such lists... Mailchimp, at least, warns that using web bugs is imperfect at best exactly because not everyone auto-loads images. Most mailing lists should not have a problem with your refusal to show images by default. Usually, they only get rid of people when they get a bounce message.
From my conversations elsewhere on line, Mailchimp users don't always spot that warning, and not all services notify their users. Non-technical users of mailing lists tend not to look at the details, so they didn't know some email users block automatic downloads.

I belong to a small nonprofit that uses MemberPlanet for communicating with members, and the person who handles that service was never told about - or never noticed - the limits of how their system could tell if mail had been read. I checked some members who showed up as not having read any mail and found that many of them had not been opening images.

(The bigger problem is that most people tend to think everybody reads email the same way they do, when in practice email can be read in many different ways.)
 


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