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Sometimes when I am in the mood and feeling evil, I tell them that that another call is coming in and I put them on hold forever!
My temptation is to tell scammers that they have reached an FBI number and that their call is being traced. However, the general recommendation is to minimize you time on the call so that they can't collect info.
 


My temptation is to tell scammers that they have reached an FBI number and that their call is being traced. However, the general recommendation is to minimize you time on the call so that they can't collect info.
Be cautious: impersonating a law enforcement officer is a misdemeanor in most states.
 


Sometimes when I am in the mood and feeling evil, I tell them that that another call is coming in and I put them on hold forever!
One of my favorite tricks. I also have been called back more than once for being rude (and I wasn't even really wound up yet... ;-)
 




I called BS on a scammer and hung up, and they actually called me back to yell at me for being rude. Seriously?
Let me caution those tempted to lash out at human robocallers. They have a number of means to make your life miserable. The simplest one for them, which is a real pain for you, is the robo-no-response tactic: There are robocaller programs which are designed to call numbers in databases and just hang up when you answer or stay on the line for 10 or 20 seconds. All intended just to annoy a robocall victim who gives them a tongue lashing. The robocallers can set this up to call you several times a day from spoofed phone numbers, and it costs them very little since they already have a cheap phone access system.

Further, they can sell your phone number to robocallers you really don't want it to be associated with, such as child porn sellers.

The legal way to counter real humans is to say "Take me off your list". Yes, I know that won't work very often. However, I have found that changing the message to "This is a business phone (even though it's your home phone); take us off your list" actually does result in slightly fewer interruptions.
 


Let me caution those tempted to lash out at human robocallers. They have a number of means to make your life miserable. The simplest one for them, which is a real pain for you, is the robo-no-response tactic: There are robocaller programs which are designed to call numbers in databases and just hang up when you answer or stay on the line for 10 or 20 seconds. All intended just to annoy a robocall victim who gives them a tongue lashing. The robocallers can set this up to call you several times a day from spoofed phone numbers, and it costs them very little since they already have a cheap phone access system.

Further, they can sell your phone number to robocallers you really don't want it to be associated with, such as child porn sellers.

The legal way to counter real humans is to say "Take me off your list". Yes, I know that won't work very often. However, I have found that changing the message to "This is a business phone (even though it's your home phone); take us off your list" actually does result in slightly fewer interruptions.
How can that be any worse than what we all ready have?

I have repeatedly asked callers to not call us. They all ignored it. I have asked three times for one "worthy cause" we've donated to in the past to quit calling. Each time they have promised no further calls. Guess how that went.

Our land line is answered by an answering machine. Our iPhones are set to "Silence Unknown Callers."
 


Sometimes when I am in the mood and feeling evil, I tell them that that another call is coming in and I put them on hold forever!
One time I had a scam caller I put them on speakerphone, carried on with my own work while chatting away to them as if I was a really dumb user, constantly asking for the instructions to be repeated, not knowing where buttons or icons were. Kept them going for over 25+ minutes but the best bit was the scammer getting more and more exasperated as he kept saying right click or click the second button for over 5 minutes, at one point, as if I didn't understand the instruction. I eventually relented and told him my computer was a "Mac" and my mouse only had *one* button. He slammed the phone down on me…
 



On the subject of phishing, over the last few months, a number of email accounts I manage, plus those of a fair number of my clients, have been getting very short emails from people known to the recipient. One account gets several a day. The content will normally be the name or the recipient, then a line space, then a very short coded URL, then another line space, then the name of the sender.

They appear to come from Vietnam. They have the sender's correct name and email address, except that the domain is replaced by the Vietnamese one. Quite often the sender has a Yahoo address - but not always.

I tell everyone to treat them as malicious and delete them. So far, no one has come to harm, but does anyone know what these things aim to do?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
FYI regarding robocall phone abuses...
Ars Technica said:
DOJ sues US telecom providers for connecting Indian robocall scammers
... Fraudulent robocalls are a serious problem in the United States—and the Justice Department says two US companies contributed significantly to the problem. Over a 23-day period in May and June of last year, for example, defendant TollFreeDeals connected 720 million calls to US numbers. According to the Justice Department, 425 million of the calls lasted for one second or less—suggesting that many were unwanted.

The feds say that during those two months, TollFreeDeals connected 182 million calls from a single India-based call center. Of these calls, more than 90 percent appeared to come from one of 1,000 source numbers. And of those numbers, more than 80 percent have been associated with fraudulent robocalls.
Ars Technica said:
FCC “fined” robocallers $208 million since 2015 but collected only $6,790
... Since Ajit Pai became FCC chairman in January 2017, the FCC has issued $202 million in forfeiture orders against robocallers but has collected none of it, the Journal wrote. That includes a $120 million penalty issued in May 2018 against a robocaller that was accused of making 96 million robocalls during a three-month period in order to trick people into buying vacation packages.
 


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