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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Meanwhile I am looking for an external enclosure or PCI card which will hold two removed Mac SSDs. Each is 256GB and are kinda useless individually. Bonus points for making them look like a single drive to the Mac it is attached to.
If they're typical special/proprietary Apple SSDs (and not standard 2.5" SATA SSDs), you probably need to determine which one of the oddball proprietary configurations they are. OWC has some enclosures for some of Apple's special SSDs, but I don't know of any others, off-hand.
 


Meanwhile I am looking for an external enclosure or PCI card which will hold two removed Mac SSDs. Each is 256GB and are kinda useless individually. Bonus points for making them look like a single drive to the Mac it is attached to.
I have the Oyen Digital MiniPro RAID V3 USB-C [Amazon] external enclosure, which can take two SSDs and is configurable as hardware RAID. It’s not Thunderbolt 3, so it’s not very fast, but at $99 it ought to serve your purpose very nicely.
 


Those look a little clunkier than the Samsung T5's I've been buying and using, but I've bought Oyen Digital enclosures in the past and had decent luck with them.
Concerning the T5, the drive arrived yesterday, and I erased and reformatted as HFS+ (Journaled), etc. My current iMac has USB 3.0 ports. I did a trial backup of the entire drive using Carbon Copy Cloner. The internal drive is a 1TB 5400 RPM mechanical drive with about 135GB of data on it. A full backup to the T5 took a little over 120 minutes, including the recovery partition. Last week I did a trial backup with CCC to an older mechanical drive I pulled from an earlier iMac and installed in an external enclosure from OWC. This has FireWire ports on it, which I connected to the current iMac's Thunderbolt 2 ports with an adapter cable (bit of a kludge but it works). Now, that too took a little over 120 minutes – including the recovery partition, maybe 125 minutes.

I would have expected the T5 to be much, much faster than the old mechanical drive. Is the limiting factor the internal drive on the iMac? The simple fact of moving the data? I'm wondering what a command line copy using tar or something similar would have taken? I realize that the USB 3.0 port does not provide the throughput that the T5 is capable of. I'd be curious to benchmark the read/write speeds of the drive. Is there an easy way to do that? Nice little drive though. So amazingly compact.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I would have expected the T5 to be much, much faster than the old mechanical drive. Is the limiting factor the internal drive on the iMac?
Well... yes, of course. Adding a fast T5 doesn't make that slow internal hard drive any faster than it was before nor let you copy data off it any faster. (The USB 3.0 port is not a significant limitation.) Try booting off the T5 and see if you notice any difference in speed....

Also, see post #24040 for more perspective on backups to a T5.
 


Also, see post #24040 for more perspective on backups to a T5.
Interesting. I'm assuming the internal drive on the MacBook Pro 2015 was a SSD. You don't mention the port interface. Was it Thunderbolt 3? By the way, an incremental backup using SuperDuper to an external mechanical drive (7200 rpm) takes about 60 minutes to back up 6GB of files on a system with about 950,000 files on it. I'll try booting from the T5 to see what that's like.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Interesting. I'm assuming the internal drive on the MacBook Pro 2015 was a SSD.
Yes, that's the only possible configuration for a 2015 MacBook Pro. (These computers use an AHCI SSD, which is slower than the NVMe SSDs in 2016 and newer MacBook Pros.)
You don't mention the port interface. Was it Thunderbolt 3?
I didn't mention it because there's only one possibility: USB 3.0. The laptop doesn't have Thunderbolt 3, and the Samsung T5 [Amazon] isn't a Thunderbolt device; it's a USB device, which plugs into the MacBook Pro's USB 3.0 port.
 


My mom's Early 2012 Mac Mini needs a new 2.5"drive and I have the pulled SSD from my Early-2015 MacBook Pro. How about an Apple SSD to 2.5" SATA adaptor that I can use to repurpose my old SSD into my mom's Mac Mini?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
My mom's Early 2012 Mac Mini needs a new 2.5"drive and I have the pulled SSD from my Early-2015 MacBook Pro. How about an Apple SSD to 2.5" SATA adaptor that I can use to repurpose my old SSD into my mom's Mac Mini?
Good luck, and let us know if you find one...
iFixit said:
MacBook Pro 13" Retina Display Early 2015 Teardown
  • The proprietary PCIe SSD still isn't a standard drive.
I suggest just buying something like a Samsung 860 EVO [Amazon] or Crucial MX500 [Amazon]. The current prices at Amazon for the 500GB versions of these two high-quality SSDs are under $60.
 


Try booting off the T5 and see if you notice any difference in speed....
Holy smokes, what a difference! The T5 booted in a matter of seconds (maybe 10-15); the internal drive took over a minute and then another 30-60 seconds to populate the desktop icons. Surprisingly fast for an external device. Interestingly, it is listed on the screen as "EFI-boot" rather than "Samsung-T5," which is how it is labeled. I'm impressed.
 


Holy smokes, what a difference! ... I'm impressed.
This is one reason I am not so quick to dismiss any of the recent iMac models which come with an hard disk or Fusion drive. If they have USB 3.0 or Thunderbolt 3, there are affordable external solutions you can boot from to provide a faster, and very acceptable, performance increase. This allows you to use the internal drive for archival storage. The roles are reversed, but the result is much the same.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
This is one reason I am not so quick to dismiss any of the recent iMac models which come with an hard disk or Fusion drive. If they have USB 3.0 or Thunderbolt 3, there are affordable external solutions you can boot from to provide a faster, and very acceptable, performance increase.
While that's true and noteworthy, let me also add:
  • Internal SSDs in modern Macs are not only "neater" but also much faster than USB 3 SSDs (the newer and the larger, the faster).
  • External Thunderbolt drives can be much faster than USB 3 drives but involve issues with compatibility, thermal throttling and high prices. Thunderbolt 3-equipped Macs benefit more than Thunderbolt 2 Macs (by supporting Thunderbolt 3 external drives, such as the Samsung X5).
  • Thunderbolt has had some nasty, low-level reliability issues that affect different people/systems differently, depending on many obscure details.
  • Thermal throttling may be an issue with external SSDs used for intensive work. (Large, self-powered Thunderbolt enclosures with built-in cooling may mitigate the issue.)
  • 10Gbps USB-C devices can be an appealing intermediate step (e.g. with an NVMe SSD or SATA SSD RAID), but these are not common and may not be worth fussing with. Standard USB 3 SSDs, despite their limitations, provide giant improvements of hard drives, amplified further by Apple software changes that have crippled hard drive performance since OS X 10.9.
 


MCE Technologies MacBook Air and MacBook Pro SSD (flash) upgrades still look good to me, but I don't see AHCI options for the MacBook Air, so macOS 10.13 is required for these (but NVMe also provides much higher performance):
FYI - It appears MCE Tech is no longer in business.

I had a client inform me that a link to one of their drives I had sent him is no longer working. Upon further review none of the product links on their website work when trying to make a purchase and all of the phone numbers I found said they were no longer in service when dialed.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
FYI - It appears MCE Tech is no longer in business. I had a client inform me that a link to one of their drives I had sent him is no longer working. Upon further review none of the product links on their website work when trying to make a purchase and all of the phone numbers I found said they were no longer in service when dialed.
That’s very disappointing news, as the company was a rare source of upgrades for Apple’s non-standard SSDs. I wonder what happened?
 


... Critical compatibility issues:
... You cannot use a non-powered Thunderbolt 3 device — e.g. Samsung X5 or Envoy Pro EX — with an older Mac's Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 port, even with a Thunderbolt 3-to-Thunderbolt 2 adapter — it simply won't work all by itself.​
You can use such a non-powered Thunderbolt 3 device with an older Mac, however, only by connecting it to a powered Thunderbolt 3 dock that you then connect via the Thunderbolt 3-Thunderbolt 2 adapter and Thunderbolt 2 cable to the older Mac's Thunderbolt/Thunderbolt 2 port.​
I had a chat with the OWC tech support a couple of weeks ago and they told me the Envoy Pro EX would work with the Thunderbolt adapter. I guess even they get confused on their own products.

One reason why I'm looking into a fast external boot device for my 2014 iMac 5K is I'm getting the following message from DiskWarrier at startup:
DiskWarrior Hardware Test Notice
The hard drive's built-in temperature sensor indicates an above normal temperature of 134.6 F (57 C), this might indicate a failure or pending failure that could result in loss of data.

Device: APPLE SSD SD0128F
Serial number: ...
Volume(s): iMac Fusion, vm
I don't know if this is a real problem or not. My Mac has the 3TB Fusion drive, and it gives this message even when the machine just cold booted. Maybe it's from the last time it was running for a longer time period.

I'd prefer to get a fast device now that I can make work with my older iMac but is still usable should I get a new Mac with Thunderbolt 3 in the future.
 


OWC's product naming is absurdly confusing to say the least... Critical compatibility issues:
Thunderbolt 3 and USB-C ports look the same but aren't. You can use a USB-C device with a Thunderbolt 3/USB-C port, but you cannot use a Thunderbolt 3 device with a non-Thunderbolt USB-C port nor with any other USB port.​
You cannot use a non-powered Thunderbolt 3 device — e.g. Samsung X5 or Envoy Pro EX — with an older Mac's Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 port, even with a Thunderbolt 3-to-Thunderbolt 2 adapter — it simply won't work all by itself.​
You can use such a non-powered Thunderbolt 3 device with an older Mac, however, only by connecting it to a powered Thunderbolt 3 dock that you then connect via the Thunderbolt 3-Thunderbolt 2 adapter and Thunderbolt 2 cable to the older Mac's Thunderbolt/Thunderbolt 2 port.​
I have a late 2015 iMac with a fusion drive. I have purchased a Samsung T5 2TB SSD. I tried to hook it up to the Thunderbolt 2 port using an Apple Thunderbolt 2 to Thunderbolt 3 adaptor with the adaptor plugged into the T5. Apparently the adaptor does not pass the power. So I connected the T5 to the USB port. The USB port is good for up to 5 Gbps and the Thunderbolt 2 port is good for up to 20 GPS. Using the T5, would I be able to tell the difference if I can find a Thunderbolt 2 to a Thunderbolt 3 adaptor that passes power? My iMac works just fine booting on the T5 using Mojave with the T5 formatted to APFS with a clone of the fusion drive using CCC. I intend to use the fusion drive as my backup.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I have a late 2015 iMac with a fusion drive. I have purchased a Samsung T5 2TB SSD. I tried to hook it up to the Thunderbolt 2 port using an Apple Thunderbolt 2 to Thunderbolt 3 adaptor with the adaptor plugged into the T5. Apparently the adaptor does not pass the power. So I connected the T5 to the USB port. The USB port is good for up to 5 Gbps and the Thunderbolt 2 port is good for up to 20 GPS. Using the T5, would I be able to tell the difference if I can find a Thunderbolt 2 to a Thunderbolt 3 adaptor that passes power? My iMac works just fine booting on the T5 using Mojave with the T5 formatted to APFS with a clone of the fusion drive using CCC. I intend to use the fusion drive as my backup.
This is certainly confusing stuff, and you're very confused... :-)

Let me try to explain again:

The Samsung T5 is a USB device, not a Thunderbolt device. It will never, ever, ever work as a Thunderbolt device, no matter what adapters you use. It will never work with Thunderbolt 1 or Thunderbolt 2 ports. You will have to plug it into your USB 3.0 ports, where it will work really well at 5Gbps and give you far better performance than a Fusion drive.*

If you want even faster performance, what you can do is buy a Thunderbolt 3 powered dock, such as the CalDigit TS3+ and connect that via the Apple Thunderbolt 3-to-2 adapter and a Thunderbolt 2 cable to the Thunderbolt 2 port in the iMac. Then you can connect a Thunderbolt 3 device - such as a Samsung X5 (not T5) - to the dock and max out your Thunderbolt 2 performance.


*If you have a newer Mac with a USB-C port, you can plug a Samsung T5 into that, too, but you'll get only the slightest increase in performance.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... One reason why I'm looking into a fast external boot device for my 2014 iMac 5K is I'm getting the following message from DiskWarrier at startup...
I don't know if this is a real problem or not. My Mac has the 3TB Fusion drive, and it gives this message even when the machine just cold booted. Maybe it's from the last time it was running for a longer time period. I'd prefer to get a fast device now that I can make work with my older iMac but is still usable should I get a new Mac with Thunderbolt 3 in the future.
Fusion drives make me nervous re reliability (and performance), and I've avoided them completely.

I recommend first that you immediately check the SMART data on your Fusion drive SSD and hard drive. (I typically use the DriveDX app, but SoftRAID and other apps should be able to help do this.)

After that, you can decide if and how to replace the Fusion drive. A Samsung T5 is easy, modestly priced and fast. If you have USB 3.0, that should work just fine. (You can split the internal Fusion drive and use the hard drive for backup, if it checks out clean on SMART data, or get another external drive for backup.)

If you really want to go through the trouble and expense of buying a high-performance Thunderbolt 3 system, you can do what I suggested earlier:
You can use such a non-powered Thunderbolt 3 device with an older Mac, however, only by connecting it to a powered Thunderbolt 3 dock that you then connect via the Thunderbolt 3-Thunderbolt 2 adapter and Thunderbolt 2 cable to the older Mac's Thunderbolt/Thunderbolt 2 port.
Or you can buy an externally powered Thunderbolt 3 storage system and connect that via Apple's Thunderbolt 3-Thunderbolt 2 adapter to the older Mac's older Thunderbolt port.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
There's one more approach for very high-speed Thunderbolt 3 storage, which I described previously:
See also:
But what happens if you connect it to a CalDigit TS3 Plus Thunderbolt 3 dock and then connect the dock to a Apple Thunderbolt 3-to-Thunderbolt 2 adapter and then connect that with a 6' OWC Thunderbolt cable to a 2015 MacBook Pro?

Write: 1315 MB/sec
Read: 1333 MB/sec
 


Meanwhile I am looking for an external enclosure or PCI card which will hold two removed Mac SSDs. Each is 256GB and are kinda useless individually. Bonus points for making them look like a single drive to the Mac it is attached to.
I agree. I would love to have an enclosure, like the OWC drive enclosure that is the same footprint and dimensions of my Mac Mini but be able to hold 3-4 SSDs. Now that would be nice.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I agree. I would love to have an enclosure, like the OWC drive enclosure that is the same footprint and dimensions of my Mac Mini but be able to hold 3-4 SSDs. Now that would be nice.
Well, this isn't quite the same, but...
Kickstarter said:
Animaionic – turns your Mac Mini into a Workstation
A docking station for extra graphic cards and SSD drives – long awaited compact alternative to a Mac Pro giant.

Estimated delivery May 2020
 




I had a chat with the OWC tech support a couple of weeks ago and they told me the Envoy Pro EX would work with the Thunderbolt adapter. I guess even they get confused on their own products.

One reason why I'm looking into a fast external boot device for my 2014 iMac 5K is I'm getting the following message from DiskWarrier at startup:

I don't know if this is a real problem or not. My Mac has the 3TB Fusion drive, and it gives this message even when the machine just cold booted. Maybe it's from the last time it was running for a longer time period.

I'd prefer to get a fast device now that I can make work with my older iMac but is still usable should I get a new Mac with Thunderbolt 3 in the future.
Wasn't the 3TB drive the one Apple replaced due to extensive failures? That was a Seagate, if I recall correctly.
 




My DiskWarrior warning is about the 128GB SSD piece of the 3TB fusion drive.
Not having a Fusion drive in my office, I was wondering if DiskWarrior is being mislead by the "Fusion'ing" of the drives and is reporting the SSD as the problem rather than the 3TB. (Sorry; I just hate Apple's cheap-a$$ workaround to spinning hard drives.)
 


That’s very disappointing news, as the company was a rare source of upgrades for Apple’s non-standard SSDs. I wonder what happened?
I'm not all that surprised. I bought a SSD (NVMe, I think) and enclosure about a year ago.
It really didn't work quite right. I had a long and nice interchange with the head of the company about it, but it seemed to me something was off with product and likely the company. Too bad...
 


I had a chat with the OWC tech support a couple of weeks ago and they told me the Envoy Pro EX would work with the Thunderbolt adapter. I guess even they get confused on their own products. One reason why I'm looking into a fast external boot device for my 2014 iMac 5K is I'm getting the following message from DiskWarrier at startup:
DiskWarrior Hardware Test Notice
The hard drive's built-in temperature sensor indicates an above normal temperature of 134.6 F (57 C), this might indicate a failure or pending failure that could result in loss of data.

Device: APPLE SSD SD0128F
Serial number: ...
Volume(s): iMac Fusion, vm
I don't know if this is a real problem or not. My Mac has the 3TB Fusion drive, and it gives this message even when the machine just cold booted. Maybe it's from the last time it was running for a longer time period.
I have gotten that same message occasionally when launching DiskWarrior. It doesn't make full sense to me, so I ignore it. Perhaps I shouldn't?
 






I will be using Turbo Tax for my 2019 returns and will need to migrate from Sierra to Mojave on a 2017 iMac with a 1TB fusion drive. I am concerned about performance and would like some real-world experiences installing Mojave on an internal 1TB Fusion drive. As an option, I could install on a Samsung T5 external SSD.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I will be using Turbo Tax for my 2019 returns and will need to migrate from Sierra to Mojave on a 2017 iMac with a 1TB fusion drive. I am concerned about performance and would like some real-world experiences installing Mojave on an internal 1TB Fusion drive. As an option, I could install on a Samsung T5 external SSD.
I don't have any experience with fusion drives to share, and hopefully someone else can answer the question directly. But here's some information that makes me think that an SSD will be your best option (either a USB SSD, such as the Samsung T5 [Amazon], or a much faster Thunderbolt 3 SSD, such as the Samsung X5 [Amazon]):
Bombich Software said:
If space and cost aren't issues, a Thunderbolt 3 SSD RAID enclosure with good cooling should give you the best performance, and a Thunderbolt 3 PCIe expansion box, such as those designed for eGPUs, can also offer that in conjunction with one of the new PCIe 3.0 x16 cards from Sonnet or OWC that hold four M.2 SSDs.
 


I don't have any experience with fusion drives to share, and hopefully someone else can answer the question directly. But here's some information that makes me think that an SSD will be your best option (either a USB SSD, such as the Samsung T5 [Amazon], or a much faster Thunderbolt 3 SSD, such as the Samsung X5 [Amazon]):
If space and cost aren't issues, a Thunderbolt 3 SSD RAID enclosure with good cooling should give you the best performance, and a Thunderbolt 3 PCIe expansion box, such as those designed for eGPUs, can also offer that in conjunction with one of the new PCIe 3.0 x16 cards from Sonnet or OWC that hold four M.2 SSDs.
I just had a user's older iMac (2013 I think) upgraded to an internal 2TB SSD (Samsung EVO SATA). Unfortunately, I didn't perform the task, but a colleague at work did (Apple Authorized Tech with all the parts/tools available). It required a 3.5" to 2.5" drive adapter.

He noted he left the fusion drive inside, as it would mean taking out the logicboard* to remove the small SSD, and he suggested I run a command to not allow it to mount (or use it as a small storage drive... 128GB). I opted to run the terminal command and not mount it.

I did learn it was a pain to move data from one Catalina drive to another Catalina drive, as there were multiple users, and Apple treats the drive as two partitions (Macintosh HD and Macintosh HD - Data). Kudos to Bombich's Carbon Copy Cloner for making this possible.

Ric's suggestion for external boot drive is another option, since Thunderbolt booting performance along with an SSD [should be far] faster than the internal hard drive Apple provides (if I recall correctly, a Seagate-Apple branded 1TB).

The SSD upgrade made a significant difference over the 1TB fusion drive (really a 128GB SSD and Seagte 1TB hard disk drive).

Note with OWC upgrades that you must upgrade to 10.13.x before doing the Aura Pro SSD upgrade if going that route.

(*I do not endorse and am not affiliated with iFixit for upgrade/repairs.)
 


I was the one who had sent Ric the data on the Sonnet M.2 4×4 PCIe card after he had posted the details for the Pegasus, OWC and other similar solutions. Had been waiting around for the test website to be moved to live so I could link back to it for discussion to make that exact point. The folks at 9to5Mac made a video showing what you described at got around 7000 MB/s read and write speeds with the Sonnet card.
Since I don't have my Mac Pro yet but wanted to take advantage of the holiday sales, I ordered the Sonnet board and four Samsung EVO 970 Plus SSDs, along with a Sonnet external Thunderbolt 3 [PCIe enclosure], so I could burn them in.

Just be aware that you may need to perform a firmware upgrade via Windows before the Samsung EVO 970 Plus drives work on macOS.
 


He noted he left the fusion drive inside, as it would mean taking out the logicboard* to remove the small SSD, and he suggested I run a command to not allow it to mount (or use it as a small storage drive... 128GB). I opted to run the terminal command and not mount it.
I wonder if it would be possible to create a fusion drive from the Apple blade SSD and your new SATA SSD. The logic here is that the PCIe SSD is probably faster than your SATA SSD, so you may see performance improvement when they're fused.

On the other hand, if the SATA SSD's performance is good enough, then you probably don't want to add the complexity just to boost performance by a few more percentage points.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I wonder if it would be possible to create a fusion drive from the Apple blade SSD and your new SATA SSD. The logic here is that the PCIe SSD is probably faster than your SATA SSD, so you may see performance improvement when they're fused.
In fact, this seems to be an option in some Windows systems (e.g. Dell Inspiron 5491), where you can configure BIOS settings for "RAID" (or not) to combine an NVMe SSD with a SATA device (e.g. SSD).
Dell said:
Inspiron 5491 2n1
Service Manual

SATA Operation
Configures operating mode of the integrated SATA hard drive controller.
Default: RAID. SATA is configured to support RAID (Intel Rapid [Storage] Technology).
Intel said:
Intel® Rapid Storage Technology
... Intel® Smart Response Technology is a feature of Intel Rapid Storage Technology that recognizes and automatically stores your most frequently used applications and data into a high performance SSD while giving you full access to the large storage capacity of a hard disk drive (hard disk drive). This enables a lower-cost, small-capacity SSD to be used in conjunction with a high-capacity hard disk drive. Intel Smart Response Technology enables your system to perform faster than a system with just a hard disk drive.
 


I just had a user's older iMac (2013 I think) upgraded to an internal 2TB SSD (Samsung EVO SATA). Unfortunately, I didn't perform the task, but a colleague at work did (Apple Authorized Tech with all the parts/tools available). It required a 3.5" to 2.5" drive adapter.

He noted he left the fusion drive inside, as it would mean taking out the logicboard* to remove the small SSD, and he suggested I run a command to not allow it to mount (or use it as a small storage drive... 128GB). I opted to run the terminal command and not mount it.

I did learn it was a pain to move data from one Catalina drive to another Catalina drive, as there were multiple users, and Apple treats the drive as two partitions (Macintosh HD and Macintosh HD - Data). Kudos to Bombich's Carbon Copy Cloner for making this possible.

Ric's suggestion for external boot drive is another option, since Thunderbolt booting performance along with an SSD [should be far] faster than the internal hard drive Apple provides (if I recall correctly, a Seagate-Apple branded 1TB).

The SSD upgrade made a significant difference over the 1TB fusion drive (really a 128GB SSD and Seagte 1TB hard disk drive).

Note with OWC upgrades that you must upgrade to 10.13.x before doing the Aura Pro SSD upgrade if going that route.

(*I do not endorse and am not affiliated with iFixit for upgrade/repairs.)
I would very much endorse adding a fast external SSD instead of messing around with a fusion drive. The fusion drive becomes a bootable backup. The T5 disk is so small that one could tape or otherwise affix the SSD to the base of an iMac.
 


My recommendation on spinning drives: do not install APFS, or you will suffer a performance penalty. Also with APFS formatted volumes, Apple's Disk Utility First Aid is the only one that can check an APFS volume for problems. No third-party app yet can work on APFS-formatted volumes including disk defraggers, which on SSD's is only required for Adobe Photoshop or Illustrator, due to their Scratch disk space usage requirements.

One final recommendation, backup, backup, backup, especially with APFS volumes.
I'm curious about this (again) because I've held off moving from Sierra to Mojave for precisely this reason (internal hard drive). However, my sister has a slightly older iMac, also with an internal hard drive, and recently upgraded to Mojave (well, Apple talked her into it). I used her machine briefly the other day, and it did not seem significantly different in actual operation. She said it takes longer to return from sleep, though (more than 30 seconds).

Also, I use my iMac for work, and, although I have lots of space on the drive, I have several professional applications, along with MS Office, all of which I use on a regular basis. My sister, on the other hand, uses only Safari and Mail, and has about 45 GB of drive space in use. I'm still on the fence about this.
 


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