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Model Name: iMac
Model Identifier: iMac16,2
Processor Name: Intel Core i5
Processor Speed: 2.8 GHz
10.13.4 "upgrade"

Startup stalls at about 40% on the progress bar most of the time now, not always. Do a hard restart and then it starts, although it does have a "pause-blink" as I would call it, at the same point as before.

Just another of the dozens of High Sierra "events" in the last 6 months, or something that others have seen?

Even though it's a 2015, it's new; it's only been in use for about two months.

Also, is anyone experiencing Magic Mouse that will only accept diagonal motions? Swapped it out with an older one that I had, no issues. I seldom get a year out of those, anyone else? I like the feel of them, but reliable they are not.

Update: simple answer on the mouse: a piece of lint or something on one of the optic lenses.
 
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it does have a "pause-blink" as I would call it, at the same point as before
That might be normal — it's the spot where the video drivers are loading, if I'm not mistaken.

How long have you tried letting it chew things over before doing the hard restart?
 


That might be normal — it's the spot where the video drivers are loading, if I'm not mistaken. How long have you tried letting it chew things over before doing the hard restart?
As long as an hour (because I was away from the computer). However, it has not happened in the last 3 days, so we shall see.
 
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Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I don't know if anyone else has ever wanted to do this, but I was looking for a way to immediately log out of an account that had been logged into.

I created this AppleScript (using Script Editor.app), which performs an immediate logout when run, exiting to a login screen:
AppleScript:
do shell script "launchctl reboot logout"
I then exported the AppleScript as type Application. Next, I logged into the account to be auto-logged out and went into System Preferences > Users & Groups, unlocked the lock, chose the account name, chose Login Items, and added the application.

Here's a web page where I found some essential information:
What Is the Mac OS X Terminal Command to Log Out the Current User?​
 


Here's a strange one. I have a 2015 iMac 5K with 1TB SSD and 16GB RAM running macOS 10.14.1. For about the last three or four weeks I get a random delay at startup.

Normal startup shows the progress bar going about half way, pausing, then completing startup - total elapsed time, under 20 seconds.

Once per day the progress bar doesn't pause but goes slowly all the way to the end, taking over one minute to boot. This usually occurs only overnight. Once it occurred at 11 P.M., then didn't occur the next morning. If I let the Mac sit for 6-7 hours during the day, it boots quickly. It's only at night the problem occurs. Once booted, there is no problem. The problem is repeatable each and every night.

I've gone through about everything I can and opened a case with Apple. I've disconnected the Time Machine drive, did a clean OS installation after wiping the drive and reformatting APFS. All third-party software is set to not check for updates. The only Apple settings that check are the time, and auto-download and install security software, but that doesn't occur every night. I'm using Ethernet, and Wi-Fi is turned off.

Any thoughts?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Once per day the progress bar doesn't pause but goes slowly all the way to the end, taking over one minute to boot.
I wouldn't be surprised if macOS were searching for malware at these points, but I'm not sure how to determine that, exactly. (It may not be included in system logs - I haven't found anything when looking there.)
 



Here's a strange one. I have a 2015 iMac 5K with 1TB SSD and 16GB RAM running macOS 10.14.1. For about the last three or four weeks I get a random delay at startup.

Normal startup shows the progress bar going about half way, pausing, then completing startup - total elapsed time, under 20 seconds.

Once per day the progress bar doesn't pause but goes slowly all the way to the end, taking over one minute to boot. This usually occurs only overnight. Once it occurred at 11 P.M., then didn't occur the next morning. If I let the Mac sit for 6-7 hours during the day, it boots quickly. It's only at night the problem occurs. Once booted, there is no problem. The problem is repeatable each and every night.

I've gone through about everything I can and opened a case with Apple. I've disconnected the Time Machine drive, did a clean OS installation after wiping the drive and reformatting APFS. All third-party software is set to not check for updates. The only Apple settings that check are the time, and auto-download and install security software, but that doesn't occur every night. I'm using Ethernet, and Wi-Fi is turned off.

Any thoughts?
Have you tried booting in Safe mode to see if problem occurs? Also, disconnect external devices to see if that helps.
 


Time Machine backup? Periodically it will do a "cleanup" and I find that my browser doesn't respond to the mouse and shows the spinning rainbow while this is going on.
 


Have you tried booting in Safe mode to see if problem occurs? Also, disconnect external devices to see if that helps.
It wouldn't help to boot in Safe Mode. Since Safe Mode always takes a long time to boot, there would be no way to tell if the slow boot was due to Safe Mode or the problem.
 


It wouldn't help to boot in Safe Mode. Since Safe Mode always takes a long time to boot, there would be no way to tell if the slow boot was due to Safe Mode or the problem.
The baseline reason for "Safe Mode" being a long boot is very likely different from the normal mode. If booting takes approximately the same time into Safe Mode as normal mode, the stuff that is not being loaded in the 'Safe Mode' boot is a high candidate for being one of the root causes of the problem. (Safe Mode is going to include a file system check: fsck. If your boot in "normal" mode takes as long as a fsck, then something - likely 3rd-party or external - is defective.)

If 'Safe Mode' is even longer then older OS boot, then the baseline file system (and/or utilities bundled with file system) are more likely root causes.

It is not a high-precision diagnostic, but it is an easy way to disable non-core extensions and 3rd-party stuff without going through substantive reconfigurations.
 


In our office of nine iMacs — ranging in vintage from late 2012 through mid 2017 — two of our computers simply refused to boot up earlier this week. We could see the backlight in the screen go on, but there was no start-up chime, no Apple logo, nothing. Both machines are running the current Mojave installation (10.14.1). One machine is about five years old, the other is brand new (Retina 5K, 2017).

Since we never got to boot up, the usual tricks — Boot in Safe Mode, Boot in Recovery Mode — were useless. We had to resort to pulling out the RAM chips and trying to start up to “shock” the system back to consciousness. It worked, too. But yesterday, I needed to restart one of the computers and had the same issue.

Just wondering if others are having this issue, and what to do to fix it.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
In our office of nine iMacs — ranging in vintage from late 2012 through mid 2017 — two of our computers simply refused to boot up earlier this week. ... Since we never got to boot up, the usual tricks — Boot in Safe Mode, Boot in Recovery Mode — were useless. We had to resort to pulling out the RAM chips and trying to start up to “shock” the system back to consciousness. It worked, too. But yesterday, I needed to restart one of the computers and had the same issue. Just wondering if others are having this issue, and what to do to fix it.
I'd want to try starting up in FireWire/Thunderbolt Target Disk Mode to see if that works at all.

And definitely reset the SMC, if you haven't tried that a few times already. (And I'd be sure to keep the computers connected to power - not turned off with, for example, an outlet strip power button, when not in use.)
 


[Here's] an oddball problem I'm experiencing, and it's not really debilitating:
  • I'm working with a "mid-2011" iMac, 27". It's one of the machines Apple recently blocked from installing Mojave, so it's running High Sierra (most recent version).
  • I've installed a 1TB non-Apple SSD inside that iMac, and am using that drive as the system startup drive, and it hosts all my applications. It's installed with APFS from High Sierra. And it seems to run really well, for perhaps 6 months now. Really speeded up this old iMac's performance!
  • Most of my other "user" files are hosted either on clouds and/or (for less-used files) on external spinning drives, including multiple separate backups created/maintained by Carbon Copy Cloner, ChronoSync and Apple's Time Machine.
Here's the problem I'm trying to figure out:
  • When I "Log Out" of my (admin) account on the iMac, the machine logs out to the standard "login screen" for High Sierra: It shows the icons and usernames for accounts on the machine, and the standard "blurry" vision of my desktop image. Exactly as it should be.
  • When I "Restart" or "Shut Down and Restart," the computer boots from High Sierra running on the SSD in the iMac. But the screen opens to the all-gray startup screen, showing the user accounts and the password slot in gray. I'm able to log in just fine, and when the computer boots, my regular desktop picture appears on the screen, as normal.
  • This suggests to me that the High Sierra system booting up is, somehow, different from the "resting state" system it displays when I merely "log out." I'm thinking, maybe, my SSD is booting from some version of a "recovery" drive?
  • One more symptom to note: When my computer is running, everything normal, and I access the "Startup Disk" System Preference pane, I see only the SSD High Sierra startup disk. I don't see any other systems, no recovery drive. Nothing else to boot from.
  • I have run both Apple Disk Utility and TechTool Pro on this SSD, and neither reports any problems with the disk or the System installation.
Anyone have any ideas? As I say, this doesn't interfere with my work or operation of the computer at all. It just seems, somehow, "wrong."
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
[Here's] an oddball problem I'm experiencing, and it's not really debilitating...
I think you may just be missing the distinction between pre-boot and post-boot states of the Mac. When you power up the Mac, or "restart" it, you initiate the "boot" sequence, which is a very weird and specialized part of the system with many constraints and whose job it is to load the operating system into memory. That is, it loads the "brains" and "personality" that are macOS and gets them going. ("Boot" originates from "pulling oneself up by their bootstraps.")

When you simply log out and log back in, macOS is already loaded and remains loaded, and you don't have to boot or (re)load it into memory - it's already there. So that's a radically different system environment vs. the state when you first power the computer on and macOS has yet to be loaded.

What can be very confusing is different Apple authentication dialogs that look very similar for very different tasks. At boot, you may get a username/password dialog that authenticates you for FileVault disk access. That's different from login (even though it looks so similar), which authenticates you for macOS access. (There is now additional complexity involving the T2 system and secure boot, but the T2 wouldn't apply to your older iMac.)
 


  • When I "Log Out" of my (admin) account on the iMac, the machine logs out to the standard "login screen" for High Sierra: It shows the icons and usernames for accounts on the machine, and the standard "blurry" vision of my desktop image. Exactly as it should be.
  • When I "Restart" or "Shut Down and Restart," the computer boots from High Sierra running on the SSD in the iMac. But the screen opens to the all-gray startup screen, showing the user accounts and the password slot in gray. I'm able to log in just fine, and when the computer boots, my regular desktop picture appears on the screen, as normal.
Is your storage encrypted (via FileVault)?

When FileVault is used, the system "boots" to a stub OS that has just enough software to accept your login credentials, but nothing more. Once you provide credentials to log in (as an account that can unlock the drive), then the rest of the OS loads. When you log out, the full OS remains loaded.

The stub OS doesn't have the ability to read your desktop image or anything else from the encrypted file system, which is why you get a gray screen. Once the file system is unlocked and the rest of the OS is running, it can load the image file, which is why you can then see it.

If you're not running FileVault, then I don't know what the problem could be.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
In our office of nine iMacs — ranging in vintage from late 2012 through mid 2017 — two of our computers simply refused to boot up earlier this week. We could see the backlight in the screen go on, but there was no start-up chime, no Apple logo, nothing. Both machines are running the current Mojave installation (10.14.1). One machine is about five years old, the other is brand new (Retina 5K, 2017).
I heard about a MacBook Air that suddenly failed to start up on Friday. It's probably unrelated, but I'm keeping tabs on that problem, too. The customer is planning to visit an Apple Store tomorrow, as neither my suggestions nor Apple phone support have helped so far. (He tried it with two different power adapters in two different locations.)
 


Is your storage encrypted (via FileVault)? When FileVault is used, the system "boots" to a stub OS that has just enough software to accept your login credentials, but nothing more. Once you provide credentials to log in (as an account that can unlock the drive), then the rest of the OS loads. When you log out, the full OS remains loaded.
I have this same behavior on my company-issued Mac and can confirm that this is what happens when you encrypt the boot drive with FileVault. As a point of reference, I also have an unencrypted boot drive on my personal Mac at home (ran High Sierra, and then Mojave), and this alternate boot screen does not occur there.

And, no, you can not change the behavior of that unlock boot screen to ask for a username/password instead of using icons. Been there, researched extensively. Not possible.

About the original poster's inability to select the macOS Recovery partition in Startup Disk, I believe that's due to changes in macOS.

Yes, you no longer can select the macOS Recovery partition that's on your boot disk in either the Startup Disk preference panel or the Startup Manager (using the Option key at boot time). I went looking for it, too, having noticed this when upgrading to High Sierra and Mojave on my personal Mac.

The macOS Recovery that's installed on your boot disk is started by using Command-R or one of the other startup key combinations at boot time as documented in

Or, if you have an external disk with Time Machine setup, booting from the Time Machine disk from Startup Manager will start macOS Recovery.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
And, no, you can not change the behavior of that unlock boot screen to ask for a username/password instead of using icons. Been there, researched extensively. Not possible.
It was possible in earlier OS X versions but has been made impossible in recent macOS versions, which force at least one user account to have FileVault unlock priviliges and display this username and icon at startup. (The command-line program fdesetup was helpful for managing this in the past.)
 



Is your storage encrypted (via FileVault)? When FileVault is used, the system "boots" to a stub OS that has just enough software to accept your login credentials, but nothing more. Once you provide credentials to log in (as an account that can unlock the drive), then the rest of the OS loads. When you log out, the full OS remains loaded. The stub OS doesn't have the ability to read your desktop image or anything else from the encrypted file system, which is why you get a gray screen. Once the file system is unlocked and the rest of the OS is running, it can load the image file, which is why you can then see it. If you're not running FileVault, then I don't know what the problem could be.
Thanks to Ric, David and PERockwell for reassuring me! Yes, I'm using FileVault. So your explanations now make perfect sense. Ric's right, though: the login screens and process are virtually identical, so I simply hadn't realized FileVault had anything to do with this. (In fact, honestly, I've used FileVault for so long, and it's so transparent, that I forget I'm using it.)
Thanks!
 


As a point of contrast, on a Windows PC running Bitlocker (or other third-party full-disk encryption systems I've used, like Checkpoint), they power-on to a pre-boot screen that looks distinctly different from the Windows login screen. After you provide the drive-unlock credentials and the OS loads, you are then presented with the normal Windows login screen.

I'm not sure whether I prefer this or Apple's approach. On the one hand, it is convenient to be able to type in your login credentials only once. On the other hand, when there are two authentication screens, there is never any confusion about what you're actually doing.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
As a point of contrast, on a Windows PC running Bitlocker (or other third-party full-disk encryption systems I've used, like Checkpoint), they power-on to a pre-boot screen that looks distinctly different from the Windows login screen. After you provide the drive-unlock credentials and the OS loads, you are then presented with the normal Windows login screen. I'm not sure whether I prefer this or Apple's approach.
Apple's approach seems unnecessarily (and perversely) confusing to me, mixing up two different things in a weird way. In the process, Apple also has removed control from the first stage and reduced its security - you can no longer hide the username so that someone is required to know that as well as a password (which was possible in earlier OS X iterations); instead, a valid username is always displayed by Apple to anyone trying to unlock FileVault.
 


Apple's approach seems unnecessarily (and perversely) confusing to me, mixing up two different things in a weird way. In the process, Apple also has removed control from the first stage and reduced its security - you can no longer hide the username so that someone is required to know that as well as a password (which was possible in earlier OS X iterations); instead, a valid username is always displayed by Apple to anyone trying to unlock FileVault.
The Ubiquity installer used by Ubuntu and others offers to encrypt the hard drive as part of the install process. It works very smoothly. Conveniently for one-user systems, the installer provides an option to skip user log-in after the disk is unlocked. For possibly added security, it also provides an option to require logging into a user account with an additional password. The user name is, however, presented on the user log in screen.

It is possible to create separate user accounts on a Linux machine and encrypt them so users can't access each other's data. All the Linux machines I've set up are single-user, so I've had no reason to do that.

The Ubuntu (main) 18.10 distribution I installed last night presents a nicely formatted box to enter the password to unlock the encrypted disk. I've tried other distributions that don't bother to format the request to unlock, presenting it in tiny print at the upper left of the screen at the pause of a string of text displayed as the system boots. That's no fun.

Thinking about how the Mac log-in process has changed and now presents user names, I think of that T2 "security" chip, fingerprint ID, and all those people who've been locked out of their iPhones and iCloud by entering the wrong log-ins too many times. It wouldn't surprise me if Apple starts using the T2 to lock Macs after too many failed log-ins. Presenting a list of user accounts should reduce the number of failed logins.

If you have any interest in a deep dive into Linux encryption, the Arch Linux Wiki is a good place to begin.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I think of... all those people who've been locked out of their iPhones and iCloud by entering the wrong log-ins too many times. ... Presenting a list of user accounts should reduce the number of failed logins.
The huge problem with what Apple's doing now is its failure to identify the security realm you're logging into. When you have to enter username and password credentials for many separate Apple security realms - FileVault, macOS, iCloud, Mac App Store, iTunes Store, Apple ID, iMessage, email, etc. - and they often look the same with no indication of what you're logging into at the prompt, it's extremely confusing, especially when you have to log into multiple realms one after another, all with the same uncommunicative user interface (e.g. when trying to get to Purchased items in an Apple online store or Apple ID parameters/options).

As just one current example, I have an iPhone that keeps telling me I have to enter username and password but doesn't say why or for what, and I have no idea what in the world it's trying to do. This defies the fundamental principles of the original Macintosh human interface, which was designed to communicate clearly with its users.
 


Had a booting problem several years ago on a 2007 white MacBook. I had interrupted an install of Parallels, and after that, all l got was a black screen on restarts. (I think it was the interruption of the install and not Parallels that was the problem.)

After several restart attempts I started trying to boot from the three disk utilities that I had, DiskWarrior, TechTool Pro and Apple-provided TechTool Deluxe (?) to see if I could get the MacBook to start up.

Several attempts later, after no success with DiskWarrior and TechTool Pro, I succeeded on the second attempt running the Apple-provided troubleshooting CD using TechTool Deluxe. Took the MacBook to the Genius Bar and inquired if they had any ideas on what happened. Their comment was that I did a real good job of troubleshooting, but they were as stumped as I was.

I have no idea why Apple's version of TechTool got the job done and not the Pro version. May it was the repeated attempts.

I do a lot of tinkering with the OS's trying to resolve reported problems, and on one particular day managed to totally destroy 3 installed OS's! People I help out are amazed at how easy some of the fixes are, and then I inform them that the particular solution has in the past taken several hours and much hair-pulling to figure out.

Needless to say, I no longer interrupt any installs and will always use Apple's provided troubleshooting utilities first, if needed.
 



... I have an iPhone that keeps telling me I have to enter username and password but doesn't say why or for what, and I have no idea what in the world it's trying to do....
That one annoys me too. However, I just say no. I presume that if I'm really missing something, it will be evident soon enough. Apple seems to think I need a lot of stuff that I really don't.
 


As a point of contrast, on a Windows PC running Bitlocker (or other third-party full-disk encryption systems I've used, like Checkpoint), they power-on to a pre-boot screen that looks distinctly different from the Windows login screen. After you provide the drive-unlock credentials and the OS loads, you are then presented with the normal Windows login screen.
That's not how Bitlocker works on my PC. The startup with Bitlocker on is indistinguishable from the startup without Bitlocker. The first and only login screen is the normal Windows login screen. A single ID unlocks and logins into the domain.
 


That's not how Bitlocker works on my PC. The startup with Bitlocker on is indistinguishable from the startup without Bitlocker. The first and only login screen is the normal Windows login screen. A single ID unlocks and logins into the domain.
Interesting. I've never seen that (my experience is on Windows 10 Professional in a corporate environment).

It would appear that the behavior is configurable. On the BitLocker control panel, there's a "Change how drive is unlocked at startup" link you can use to select "Enter a PIN" (what my system uses), "Insert a USB flash drive" or "Let BitLocker automatically unlock my drive". Despite the fact that the "N" in PIN stands for "number", you can type in any passphrase for your PIN.

After doing a bit more searching, I found an article about setting up BitLocker on Windows 8.1. This article says that computers without active TPM chips give you the option to require a password or USB drive to unlock the drive, but computers with TPM chips are configured to automatically unlock the drive based on data stored in the TPM.

If you want to require a PIN in addition to the TPM, then you can hack around a bit with the group policy editor to enable that support.

It would appear that my employer's IT department enabled that feature before I ever got the computer. I just typed in the "manage-bde -status" command which shows that my drive is protected by "TPM and PIN".

Getting back to the comparison with FileVault, it would appear (based on your comments and what I've been able to find on the web) that when BitLocker is configured to unlock with only the TPM that it unlocks the drive early in the boot sequence, before you get to the login window. In contrast, FileVault does not unlock the drive until after you provide valid login credentials.

I suspect Apple has to do this because Macs do not have a TPM chip and only recently (via the T2) started including hardware capable of providing this service.
 



I wonder if this is the source of some of our startup delay problems with APFS?
I hope so. I was the one who wrote about the once per day slow startup. I've upgraded Little Snitch to 4.2.4, and I’ll see what happens. It will take several days before I'm convinced this is the fix, because the problem only occurs once daily and recently will sometimes do it other than overnight.
 


That one annoys me too. However, I just say no. I presume that if I'm really missing something, it will be evident soon enough. Apple seems to think I need a lot of stuff that I really don't.
It's most likely asking for your Apple ID for automatic downloads, iTunes, iCloud, App Store, etc. Then you will probably asked to expand your iCloud storage to the paid service. I always decline.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
And here's a startup problem with Samsung T5 SSDs (which is what I'm using a lot)...
Bombich Software said:
Help! My clone won't boot!
...
Compatibility issues specific to the Samsung T5 Portable SSD

Some users have reported that the Samsung T5 Portable SSD cannot function at all as a bootable device on the T2-based MacBook Pro 2018. Efforts even to install macOS Mojave onto this device fail to produce a bootable volume. This is a popular enclosure that we've seen great success with, and so far these reports are limited to the 2018 MacBook Pro.

The Samsung T5 Portable SSD also introduces an exceptional delay during startup, whether you're attempting to boot from that device or your Mac's internal hard drive. This appears to be a compatibility problem between the Mac's firmware and this particular SSD when the SSD is formatted as APFS. To avoid this delay, we recommend formatting the Samsung SSD as HFS+ until the compatibility problem is resolved:
There's a lot more interesting information at this web page about problems with various devices.... ("Configurations with which we have seen some problems")
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
At least some of my slow startup issues with APFS, where the boot process pauses for an extended period midway through, are apparently related to a bafflingly complex issue that manifested in weird problems trying to change FileVault and Startup Security Settings (to make a very long story short). Some related links:
These links cover a mix of issues, many obscure but some of which are extremely important/dangerous to the integrity of your data and system with the new T2/BridgeOS system seen in 2018 models. Note this, in particular, which I just stumbled on:
MIT Information Systems & Technology said:
Imaging 2018 Macbooks with the T2 chip

... If a system contains a T2 chip, it will be necessary to follow an updated procedure for installing/reinstalling the operating system, otherwise permanent damage could occur.

If reinstalling the operating system on a T2 mac, it is absolutely necessary to disable the “Secure Boot” feature. If secure boot is enabled when the drive is erased, there will be no way to install a new OS and the system will be entirely unusable until the logic board is replaced.
Meanwhile, the key to the weird problems I encountered (thankfully, I didn't quite manage to disable my T2-based system by accident) was best covered by Mike Bombich:
Carbon Copy Cloner Help said:
After cloning to an APFS Encrypted volume there is a 24-second stall during startup
All of these conditions are caused by the same underlying problem: users on the affected volume do not have access to the volume's Secure Token. There are generally two ways to get to this result:
  • The volume was erased as an encrypted volume, thus no user account was associated with the unlocking of that volume, or
  • The user accounts that are allowed to unlock the disk belonged to some previous installation of macOS on that volume
... APFS volumes that contain an installation of macOS will each have a unique "secure access token". Access to this token allows users to do things like unlock the volume (e.g. if FileVault is enabled) and to change startup security settings. Because this token is volume-specific, it can't be copied to another volume; it has to be regenerated. In addition to this Secure Token, APFS volumes also have a list of users or keys that are "bound" to the volume. These "cryptographic users" are defined within the volume metadata, not within any particular file on the volume. As a result, these bound cryptographic users cannot be modified by CCC nor transferred from one volume to another. This cryptographic user list is proprietary to Apple; only Apple tools can modify the list, and only Apple tools can generate a SecureToken.

While the SecureToken-endowed users and the cryptographic users are usually in sync on a particular volume, these lists are decoupled, and it is possible to get them out of sync. If you clone a system to a pre-encrypted APFS volume, for example, the destination has only one "Disk" crypto user. None of the user accounts on the system that you copied will be (nor can be) included in the crypto users list of that volume. Likewise, if you clone an installation of macOS to a volume that already has an installation of macOS, then you will be overwriting the user accounts that are currently in the crypto user list with new, foreign user accounts.
I only finally managed to recover control over FileVault and Startup Security Utility through complicated command-line work with the sysadminctl program, which I hadn't previously known about.

To be fair, I had brought some of this grief on myself with some non-standard security configuration work, but other problems were the result of very natural, normal operations that are excessively confusing and badly/dysfunctionally communicated in the user interface of the new macOS.

#filevault #securetoken #login #boot #encryption #resetFileVaultpassword
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
I finally connected weird APFS/FileVault/Startup Security Utiliity issues with the mid-boot pauses I've been seeing with APFS. I'm posting more details about this in the Apple Security thread.
I just resolved a boot delay with the 2018 MacBook Pro and Mojave 10.14.2 by turning off FIleVault and turning it back on again. Interestingly, the boot delay remains when choosing "Disk" and typing its password at startup, but choosing a user account instead proceeds without the delay. (I've never this problem with HFS+, only with APFS.)
 


I just resolved a boot delay with the 2018 MacBook Pro and Mojave 10.14.2 by turning off FIleVault and turning it back on again. Interestingly, the boot delay remains when choosing "Disk" and typing its password at startup, but choosing a user account instead proceeds without the delay. (I've never this problem with HFS+, only with APFS.)
How long did you wait before turning FileVault back on again? Did you wait until the disk was completely unencrypted?
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
How long did you wait before turning FileVault back on again? Did you wait until the disk was completely unencrypted?
Because the 2018 MacBook Pro has a T2 chip, I simply flipped it on and off - didn't wait for hours and hours for decryption/encryption and didn't erase or reformat anything.
 


JDW

I'm still running High Sierra on my Apple SSDs internal to my Macs, but I have a 2TB SanDisk Extreme USB external SSD with Mojave now on it.

I actually used Carbon Copy Cloner to clone my primary iMac's internal 1TB SSD contents to the external, and then I applied the Mojave update on the external. I wanted to do this to see if there would be problems, so I could decide if I wanted to then install Mojave on my internal SSD.

I have found very long boot times, most disturbingly where minutes go by with nothing but a totally black screen. Unlike what others have reported, though, I am hearing two startup chimes and two progress bars before I finally get to the desktop.

On my late 2015 5K iMac, when I am booted into High Sierra and then choose Mojave on my external SSD as the Startup Disk and restart, the first startup chime is full volume with full bass, and after some time, then I see a progress bar with the white Apple logo, and 60% of the way through it seems to restart again, and I hear a second startup chime, only this time the sound is quieter and almost no bass (almost like a firmware update), and then I see another progress bar and white Apple logo, and finally it boots to the desktop.

Am I alone in experiencing this dual chime boot sequence? ...
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
... I actually used Carbon Copy Cloner to clone my primary iMac's internal 1TB SSD contents to the external, and then I applied the Mojave update on the external. I wanted to do this to see if there would be problems, so I could decide if I wanted to then install Mojave on my internal SSD. I have found very long boot times, most disturbingly where minutes go by with nothing but a totally black screen. Unlike what others have reported, though, I am hearing two startup chimes and two progress bars before I finally get to the desktop....
The two-chime startup sequence, and the 60% mark, are an indication that the computer is failing a boot and starting the boot sequence over again, presumably with a different boot volume.

I'd suggest doing diskutil list (and perhaps also diskutil info -all) to see what you've got for volumes/partitions on your internal and external drives.

I'd also suggest reviewing Mike Bombich's help page here:
Help! My clone won't boot! | Carbon Copy Cloner | Bombich Software​
 


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