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I've been there and tried that - it doesn't work! It works for PC Windows environments but it doesn't work for macOS.
You'll be pleased to know there is a fix coming for vmware-vdiskmanager (and thus Joe Chilcote's vfuse) throwing a "Received signal 11" error.
mikeroySoft said:
Error: Received Signal 11
Just FYI, but we are planning to ship a fix for this in the next few weeks. We wanted to get it in 11.0.3 but that release was specifically to address security vulnerabilities disclosed to us. I regret that we weren't able to bundle this fix with the .0.3 release, but please be assured it's coming =)
 


Does VMware Workstation Pro do a better job with hardware acceleration when run on Linux or Windows? Are these restrictions put in place by Apple based on the hardware or OS?
VMware Workstation does not support macOS as a guest (due to Apple's licensing restrictions).

The graphics acceleration issue with macOS guests is due to restrictions or lack of functionality in macOS by Apple (can't find the exact citation right now). No macOS guest on any virtualization platform will provide graphics acceleration. They can only do an emulated basic display driver.
So, on a Mac with a VM, is Final Cut Pro X completely unusable?
Final Cut Pro X will not launch.
Has anyone tried Logic X in a VM? I wonder how that would do.
I don't use Logic Pro X, but from what I've read, it does work.
 


BTW, Parallels has a tool to expand the Windows C [virtual] drive without erasing the drive.
VMware Fusion can also do this. I just did it the other day.
Probably the worst issue using a virtual machine is that backups on the OSX side see opening Windows in the vm as a huge file that got changed. Hence, backups can take a while after visiting Windows. (Note that Carbon Copy Cloner just replaces the old 'C' drive file with a new one, even if the 'C is 100 gig or larger.)
VMWare can use split virtual disks, where it's made up of a number of slices or fragments (kind of like DMG sparse bundles). Then, your backup program only has to backup slices that have had changes within them, so the amount you have to backup may be much less than the full disk size.
 


You'll be pleased to know there is a fix coming for vmware-vdiskmanager (and thus Joe Chilcote's vfuse) throwing a "Received signal 11" error.
Thanks for that. If and when they fix it, I will retest trying to directly bring a macOS disk image into a VM and post back here (and update my articles on MacStrategy).
 


VMware Workstation does not support macOS as a guest (due to Apple's licensing restrictions).

The graphics acceleration issue with macOS guests is due to restrictions or lack of functionality in macOS by Apple (can't find the exact citation right now). No macOS guest on any virtualization platform will provide graphics acceleration. They can only do an emulated basic display driver.

Final Cut Pro X will not launch.

I don't use Logic Pro X, but from what I've read, it does work.
Thanks Todd, very useful. Good to hear about Logic Pro X.

Which host OS are you referring to that "VMware Workstation does not support macOS as a guest"? I ask because in a different thread talking about VMware Workstation within Linux, it sounded like DFG and JohnW had some success running Sierra, El Cap and Snow Leopard VMs in Workstation.
 


Which host OS are you referring to that "VMware Workstation does not support macOS as a guest"? I ask because in a different thread talking about VMware Workstation within Linux, it sounded like DFG and JohnW had some success running Sierra, El Cap and Snow Leopard VMs in Workstation.
Officially "Workstation" doesn't support macOS as a guest. "Fusion" does. You can check the VMware product vs guest OS compatibility here:
 


Officially "Workstation" doesn't support macOS as a guest. "Fusion" does. You can check the VMware product vs guest OS compatibility here:
Thanks to Ric, I found out that the last paragraph of my original linked post had the answer:
As a FYI... Workstation can't install the macOS out of the box. You'll have to 'unlock' Apple-compatible VMs. Further information can be found by searching for "Unlocker for VMware Workstation." And finally there are a few tweaks that need to be added to the vmx file before you power on the VM for the first time.
So, with a workaround, it's doable.
 




Probably no different than what Steve_M mentioned doing here.
Aside from not having to emulate a PowerPC chip to run Mac OS 9, I suspect the use of the CPU/GPU passthrough tricks are a little different, though I haven't done anything with QEMU in years, and when I did, it was on a MIPS CPU. :)

Maybe Steve_M can comment.
 


While not for the faint of hackintosh heart or the timid in technical spirit, and some may find the host to be annoying, here is a video that describes an intriguing approach to creating a macOS virtual machine with potentially very high performance that should run on a very wide range of PC hardware
Aside from not having to emulate a PowerPC chip to run Mac OS 9, I suspect the use of the CPU/GPU passthrough tricks are a little different, though I haven't done anything with QEMU in years, and when I did, it was on a MIPS CPU. :)
Maybe Steve_M can comment.
I looked at the YouTube video, and it is seems fairly 'hard-core' from my perspective. Its appeal seems to be for users who want macOS on powerful/expandable/up-to-date hardware.
  • My Linux Mint machine is a MacBook Pro 6,2, and I am using Intel graphics, not the nVidia GPU
  • I am only running Mac OS 9.2 for occasional use and a bit of fun. I am happy with the performance, except for some problems with cursor synching.
  • I am not using KVM, but I might look into it now. I presently work with my QEMU PowerPC emulator via a VNC client on Linux. (The iMac/macOS Sierra QEMU binary I use provides a built-in GUI.)
  • I am not interested in running High Sierra or later - that is why I have taken up Linux. Sad, after starting with a Mac Plus in 1988.
So, in summary it is quite different from what I am doing!
 


I've been there and tried that - it doesn't work!
It works for PC Windows environments but it doesn't work for macOS.
[FYI:]
VMware said:
VMware Fusion 11.1.0 Release Notes
  • Virtual Disk Manager utility (vmware-vdiskmanager) to convert disk fails.
    When you use the Virtual Disk Manager utility (vmware-vdiskmanager) to perform a virtual disk conversion, the command fails and returns the following message: Received signal 11.

    This issue is fixed in this release.

    Note: Fusion needs to be launched in order for vmware-vdiskmanager to work. You can learn more details in the VMware Knowledge Base article https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/65163.
 



Thanks. I saw the new version had been released. I've added new testing to my to-do list but probably won't be able to get to it until next week.
I managed to reschedule and move stuff around, so I did some testing this afternoon. Unfortunately, it still doesn't work, but the problem is different.

The issue around using the Virtual Disk Manager utility (vmware-vdiskmanager) to convert disks on macOS has indeed been fixed - no more error "Signal 11". Virtual disk links can be created to physical drives/partitions, and Virtual Disk Manager now converts those drives/partitions to VM drives. The problem is that they are not bootable within Fusion.

The basic process is:
  1. Use vmware-rawdiskCreator to create a link to the drive/partition where macOS is installed.
  2. Use vmware-vdiskmanager to convert the drive/partition to a Fusion VM disk image.
  3. Attach the Fusion VM disk image to a new macOS VM in Fusion using Fusion's default settings for the relevant version of macOS that was on the original drive/partition.
  4. Adjust the VM settings as required e.g. increase the RAM to 4GB or 8GB.
  5. Boot the VM - this is it where it fails: you get the Apple logo, but during the boot process it fails - non-bootable circle with line through it icon.
I tried multiple different drives, partitions, macOS versions (10.8, 10.10, 10.11, 10.12), conversion processes, VM settings - and they all resulted in the same non-bootable OS error. It would be very nice if it worked, but, personally, I think this is just never going to work - it's not what Apple intended when they allowed virtualisation of macOS.
 


I updated my 2019 MacBook Pro to macOS 10.14.6 (18G87) this morning, and it has crashed twice since. Does anyone know if there's a problem with this release?
 


Parallels 15 has been released:

Interestingly, according to the What's New In Parallels 15 guide [PDF], graphics in Parallels Desktop 15 have been significantly improved, compared to previous product versions.
• With the help of Apple Metal, Parallels introduces support for DirectX 11. Now you can​
run Autodesk 3ds Max 2020, Lumion, ArcGIS Pro 2.3, products from MasterSeries and​
more. You can also play many favorite games, including Madden NFL 19, Age of​
Empires: Definitive Edition, Anno 2205, Railway Empire, Space Engineers, Frostpunk,​
Risk of Rain 2 and many more.​
• DirectX 3D graphics are now accelerated by the Apple Metal engine.​
• Enhanced compatibility with new Linux distributions due to Virtio GPU that supports​
sliding mouse (when Parallels Desktop captures the guest OS mouse cursor), dynamic​
resolution (when the screen resolution changes dynamically if you resize the virtual​
machine window) and multimonitor support—even without Parallels Tools.​
• Support for DRM-based graphics required by recent versions of major Linux​
distributions.​
Although not specifically mentioned, hopefully this might help with running graphics-intensive Apple apps in a virtual machine e.g. Aperture.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Interestingly, according to the What's New In Parallels 15 guide [PDF], graphics in Parallels Desktop 15 have been significantly improved, compared to previous product versions.
Although not specifically mentioned, hopefully this might help with running graphics-intensive Apple apps in a virtual machine e.g. Aperture.
Please let us know what you find if you do some testing of the new version. (Do you have Aperture available for testing?)
 


Please let us know what you find if you do some testing of the new version. (Do you have Aperture available for testing?)
When I get a chance (might not be for a couple of weeks), I will definitely do some basic Creative Suite i.e. Photoshop testing. I can't test Aperture, sorry, as I was never an Aperture user and don't have a licence for it.
 


When I get a chance (might not be for a couple of weeks), I will definitely do some basic Creative Suite i.e. Photoshop testing. I can't test Aperture, sorry, as I was never an Aperture user and don't have a licence for it.
I'll see about installing Aperture in Parallels 15 in the next few days.

Worth mentioning: I use (and like) both Parallels and VMware Fusion. One area of distinction between the two is that the current version of Parallels Desktop runs on a greater range of Apple hardware than does VMware Fusion.
  • VMware Fusion requires a Mac introduced in 2011 or later, with the exception of the 2012 Mac Pro Quad Core with the Xeon W3565, which is incompatible. Fusion also will run on 2010 Mac Pro 6-, 8-, and 12-core models.
  • In contrast, Parallels will run on just about any Mac with a Core 2 Duo processor or better. For example, I installed Parallels 15 on a 2010 Core 2 Duo MacBook Pro, and it is running a Windows 7 virtual machine very nicely.
 


Please let us know what you find if you do some testing of the new version. (Do you have Aperture available for testing?)
I finally got around to installing Aperture 3.6 on Parallels 15 virtual machines running High Sierra and Mojave. I also tried it on a VMware Fusion instance of a Mojave virtual machine.

Unfortunately, while Aperture is able to launch and run in those environments, it runs into the same display issue seen with previous virtualization solutions: image thumbnails are visible, but the main image viewing/editing pane is empty, so you can't actually see your images.

At the moment, it looks like the only real solution for running Aperture 3.6 is running it outside of a virtual machine.
 



I've copied VM files around, and they are big. I've always presumed they're somewhat analogous to applications on Mac that are packages which present as folders. Maybe someone else with real knowledge can clarify.
The specifics are going to vary based on what VM software you're running, but in general they contain a data file describing the VM's configuration (number of CPU cores, memory, networking, peripherals, etc.) and one or more disk images representing storage devices (typically hard drives).

On my Mac, running VirtualBox, the VM's configuration file is 7-9 KB. The disk image size depends on the size you specified when you created it and how it is configured. For instance, if you create a VM with a 60 GB storage device, that file could be up to 60 GB (a "dynamic" image will start small and grow up to its maximum size as you write data to it. A fixed-size image will always be the maximum size)

Other VM systems are probably going to be similar, possibly combining the files into a single "package" folder for easier management.
 


Links dense with information — I skimmed through, then turned to "find on this page", looking for, and not finding, any declaration that VMs are compressed internally. Thanks to Ric's links and subsequent posts by John W and David Charlap, it seems we can conclude with some certainty that WStein's SSD problem wasn't caused the nature of a VM.

While I've copied VMs around to backup disks, I've never tried to mount them back. The VirtualBox links suggested the kind of drag and drop copy I've done probably wouldn't work, because each VM has a unique UUID. (Without getting deep into that again, it's the same problem I had trying to mount a Clonzilla duplicate of a Linux drive on the machine containing the Clonezilla source.)...
 


I've copied VM files around, and they are big. I've always presumed they're somewhat analogous to applications on Mac that are packages which present as folders. Maybe someone else with real knowledge can clarify.
That's basically correct. You can right-click on Parallels and VMware VM files to show the package contents. I haven't done it in a while, but if I recall correctly, you can set the actual drive files within the packages to be single files or segmented files of arbitrary size in VMware and Parallels. If I recall correctly, early virtualization tools created drive files as 2GB segments by default. Some of my older VMs are formatted this way.
 


The VirtualBox links suggested the kind of drag and drop copy I've done probably wouldn't work, because each VM has a unique UUID
Yes. VirtualBox stores a UUID in its disk images. You can backup and restore them. You can even create a new VM on another computer that uses a duplicate. What you can't do is use the original and the copy at the same time (e.g. in two different VMs) on the same computer - VirtualBox's "virtual media manager" will reject the second one you try to use.

If you need to duplicate a virtual disk such that it can be used on a new VM on the same computer, you should duplicate it using the Virtual Media Manager's GUI (or the CLI equivalent.
 


If you restore a backup copy of a VMware Fusion VM and open it, Fusion will ask if you moved it or copied it, with copied being the suggested default. Choosing moved preserves the UUID and Windows activation.

I had a simple backup copy of a VM fail to open one time, so now I compress them with Finder and back up the zip files. It's cumbersome, but I've never had another restored VM fail.
 


Ric Ford

MacInTouch
Here is some seriously fun hacking around, involving a Ryzen CPU, split into two virtual machines via one kind of "KVM" [Kernel VM], with one VM running macOS Catalina beta and each with its own graphics card and one half of a double-wide monitor with its own "KVM" [Keyboard, Video, Mouse switch] for sharing input devices between machines...
Linux Tech Tips said:
Mac? PC? You don’t have to choose.. [YouTube]
Choosing an OS can be hard – There’s only so much desk space! But a super ultrawide display can help with that.. And of course, we had to bring it to its logical conclusion.
 


Here is some seriously fun hacking around, involving a Ryzen CPU, split into two virtual machines via one kind of "KVM", with one VM running macOS Catalina beta and each with its own graphics card and one half of a double-wide monitor with its own "KVM" for switching input devices between machines...
Wow, just wow…
 


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